State and National News

Pages

13.7: Cosmos And Culture
12:22 pm
Fri April 19, 2013

What 15,000 Years Of Cooking Fish Tells Us About Humanity

Pots like this 15,000-year-old vessel from Japan are among the world's earliest cookware.
Tokamachi City Museum

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 10:39 am

Research published last week in the journal Nature shows that hunter-gatherer people living in Japan 15,000 ago cooked food in ceramic pots. Chemical analysis of the charred remains in the pots demonstrates that the food items were both marine and freshwater in origin, and almost certainly fish rather than mollusks.

Read more
Planet Money
12:21 pm
Fri April 19, 2013

Former Social Security Commissioners and Others Respond to Our Disability Story

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 9:07 am

Our series on government disability programs continues to provoke debate. A group of former commissioners from the Social Security Administration (Social Security runs the programs) put out this response.

And here's a response from the Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities.

Read more
Monkey See
12:21 pm
Fri April 19, 2013

Entirely Real Photos: Our Creepy Wax Museum Series Continues With One Direction

Fans pose for pictures with waxwork models of English-Irish boy band 'One Direction' at Madame Tussauds in London this week.
Carl Court AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 8:37 am

I can't really explain why I think wax museum pictures are so funny, but clearly, I do. And I do again.

Read more
Book Reviews
12:20 pm
Fri April 19, 2013

With Mullet Or With Monkey, Everyone Knows Superman

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 6:03 am

Whether or not you give a damn for Superman, you know who he is. Even if you've never read a comic book in your life, no one can hear the name "Superman" without a flash of recognition: red-and-yellow S on blue background, red cape, the dark-haired man in flight, jaw set, blue eyes fixed on a distant destination. He's on his way to save the world.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:20 pm
Fri April 19, 2013

Texas Fertilizer Plant Explodes; Unknown Number Killed

A vehicle is seen near the remains of a fertilizer plant burning after an explosion in West, Texas, near Waco. The explosion ripped through the fertilizer plant late Wednesday.
Mike Stone Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 3:26 am

Two-Way coverage of the explosion resumes Thursday morning. For more information, please click on the latest AP report.

A spokesman for the Texas Department of Public Safety says an unknown number of people were killed in a massive explosion at a fertilizer plant near Waco Wednesday night.

KWTX TV reports that the explosion at West Fertilizer plant in West, Texas, was reported around 7:50 p.m. The station reports:

Read more
Code Switch
12:20 pm
Fri April 19, 2013

In A Changing Oakland, Two Generations Learn How To Fit In

The author, Padmananda Rama, and her dad in the mid-'80s.
Padmananda Rama

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 3:16 pm

I'll tell you about the Oakland I know. I'll tell you about the Oakland my father knew growing up in the 1940s and '50s when being multicultural wasn't even a trend.

As the eldest sibling in his half-Filipino and half-Mexican family, he was a pioneer and I learned from his cautionary tales.

In the early 1950s, he attended high school at Oakland Tech where he was shunned by both his Filipino and Mexican classmates.

Read more
Law
12:04 pm
Fri April 19, 2013

Supreme Court Curbs Lawsuits Over Foreign Abuses

Nigerian widow Esther Kiobel, a plaintiff in Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum, cries as she speaks outside the Supreme Court in October 2012.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 7:37 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court dealt a blow to human-rights advocates Wednesday, in a case that was closely watched globally by human-rights groups and foreign governments.

The court limited the reach of a 224-year-old federal law that in recent decades has been used to hold foreign corporations and individuals accountable in U.S. courts for human-rights abuses abroad.

Read more
Author Interviews
12:03 pm
Fri April 19, 2013

A Real-Life Fight For Freedom In 'Nine Days'

Delacorte Press

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 9:10 am

Two high-school sophomores — Ethan Wynkoop and Ti-Anna Chen — sneak away from their homes in suburban Washington, D.C., and fly to Hong Kong. They're searching for Ti-Anna's father, a Chinese emigre and dissident who believes that China is just a spark away from democratic revolution.

Read more
13.7: Cosmos And Culture
12:03 pm
Fri April 19, 2013

Defining Our Place In The Universe

An illustration shows how the planet Kepler-36c might look from the surface of the neighboring Kepler-36b.
David Aguilar/Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics NASA

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 11:19 am

A widespread critique of science is that it tells us that the more we know, the more insignificant we are. It's the famous after-Copernicus blues: everything went downhill ever since Earth was moved from the center of the cosmos. Since then, the Sun was pushed out from the center too, our Milky Way galaxy is but one among hundreds of billions of others in an expanding Universe. Even the atoms we are made of are less that 5 percent of the total stuff out there.

Read more
Political Junkie
12:03 pm
Fri April 19, 2013

Sanford And Weiner: Different Humiliations, Same Remorseful Script

On the 2013 redemption/apology tour.
Ken Rudin collection

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 11:11 am

In the past three decades or so, when writing about political sex scandals became an art form, the tendency has always been to lump everyone together. There are many differences between, say, what Anthony Weiner did and what Mark Sanford did.

Read more

Pages