State and National News

Pages

Author Interviews
11:42 am
Mon April 15, 2013

A Pilgrimage Through France, Though Not For God

Tourists visit Bugarath, a small village in the foothills of the French Pyrenees, on Dec. 20, 2012.
Patrick Aventurier Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 5:05 pm

For centuries, pilgrims have made their way along the El Camino de Santiago de Compostela, or St. James' Way. It's an ancient route honoring St. James of Compostela and can take a traveler on foot for hundreds of miles to what is believed to be the apostle's burial site in northwestern Spain.

American travel writer David Downie and his wife, Alison, decided to begin their trek from their longtime home in Paris. For Downie, this wasn't necessarily a religious pilgrimage. He stresses he wasn't looking for God, though maybe enlightenment.

Read more
The Sunday Conversation
11:42 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Advice On Passion, Brilliance And Bugs In 'Letters'

Boy with magnifying glass
Pamela Albin Moore iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 10:04 am

Edward O. Wilson has spent a lifetime as a scientist, a teacher and a writer. In his scientific career, he's a preeminent biologist and a global expert on ants; as a teacher, he has been a professor at Harvard for almost six decades; as a writer, he has won two Pulitzer Prizes for his nonfiction, which presents science to a general audience.

Read more
Music Interviews
11:42 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Yeah Yeah Yeahs On Love Songs, New York And Transforming On Stage

Yeah Yeah Yeahs' new album is titled Mosquito.
Dan Martensen Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 10:04 am

Read more
Sunday Puzzle
11:42 am
Mon April 15, 2013

O Say Can You C The Answer?

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 10:04 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a two-word phrase in which the first word starts with O. Drop the O, and you'll get a new word that ends the phrase.

Last week's challenge: Name something in nine letters that is commonly read on Sunday morning. If you have the right thing, you can rearrange all the letters to name a bygone car model that you still see on the road today. What are they?

Answer: Scripture; PT Cruiser

Winner: Pam Smith of Beaverton, Ore.

Read more
Author Interviews
11:41 am
Mon April 15, 2013

After Tragedy, Young Girl Shipped West On 'Orphan Train'

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 10:04 am

Christina Baker Kline's new novel, Orphan Train, is partially set in 1929, mere months before the stock market crash that would trigger the Great Depression. A young Irish girl, Niamh (pronounced "Neeve"), has just lost her entire family after a fire ripped through their tenement building. She is turned over to authorities who put her on a train bound for the Midwest. The train is filled with dozens of other children who have lost their families in one way or another; they are now hoping that their journey will connect them with new parents and a new, better life.

Read more
Poetry
11:41 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Harmony Holiday On Finding Poetry In Her Biracial Roots

Harmony Holiday is a poet who lives in New York.
Courtesy Harmony Holiday

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 10:04 am

In celebration of National Poetry Month, Weekend Edition is hearing from young poets about what poetry means to them. This week, they spoke with Harmony Holiday, a New York poet and dance choreographer who's spending this month archiving audio of overlooked and often misunderstood poetry for The Beautiful Voices Project.


Interview Highlights

On why she first started writing poetry

Read more
You Must Read This
11:41 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Dreaming Of Justice: Hardscrabble Lives In Hallucinatory Prose

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 6:03 am

Alex Espinoza is the author of The Five Acts of Diego León.

Before becoming a novelist and educator, I was a manager at a shop in Santa Monica, Calif., selling sofas and custom-framed art to movie stars and wealthy Angelinos. Eventually I grew frustrated and, determined to reinvent myself as a writer, I quit and went back to school.

Read more
Theater
11:41 am
Mon April 15, 2013

A 'Caesar' With An African Accent

Patterson Joseph plays Brutus, the friend whose betrayal wounds Caesar most — and whose suicide caps off the play's second act.
Richard Termine BAM

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 5:09 pm

The 400-year-old plays of William Shakespeare are constantly being reinterpreted and re-envisioned for new generations. Recently, England's Royal Shakespeare Company produced a Julius Caesar set in contemporary Africa that was a hit at the World Shakespeare Festival, presented in conjunction with the London Olympics. Now the RSC has brought it to America.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:28 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Africans Win At Boston Marathon

The scene at the start of the elite women's division of the Boston Marathon on Monday.
Dominick Reuter Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 3:54 pm

Ethiopian runner Lelisa Desisa won the men's division at this year's Boston Marathon on Monday, finishing the 26.2 miles in 2 hours, 10 minutes and 22 seconds. It's the first win at Boston for the 23-year-old.

Read more
NPR Story
11:25 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Emeli Sande's 'Version Of Events'

Emeli Sande's debut album Our Version of Events
Simon Emmett/ Lauren Dukoff The Fun Star

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 12:27 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on Jan. 17, 2013.

After huge critical and commercial success last year, breakthrough British sensation Emeli Sande has her sights set on America.

It's a long way from her roots. Born to a Zambian father and English mother, the singer-songwriter was raised in Scotland. She tells NPR's Michel Martin that being the only mixed-race family in a small village had a big impact on her.

Read more

Pages