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Music Interviews
1:01 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Michael Bublé On Fishing, Sinatra And Auto-Tune

Michael Bublé's latest studio album, his eighth, is called To Be Loved.
Warwick Saint Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 5:40 pm

In some ways, Michael Bublé is just of a different time. The songs the Canadian crooner sings are the Motown, jazz and swing classics he grew up listening to with his grandfather. Bublé says he misses the pure, unadulterated sound of music made back then — though he is willing to use a little Auto-Tune once in a while.

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Sunday Puzzle
1:01 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

As You Know, Puzzles Are A Pastime

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 5:40 pm

On-air challenge: For each given category, name something in the category where the first letter is also the first letter of the category. For example, given "Military Ranks," you would say "Major."

Last week's challenge: Name a geographical location in two words — nine letters altogether — that, when spoken aloud, sounds roughly like four letters of the alphabet. What is it?

Answer: Aegean Sea; Indian Cay

Winner: Terry Thacker, Greenville, S.C.

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Music
1:01 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Xenia Rubinos: Adventures In Syncopation

Xenia Rubinos' debut album is titled Magic Trix.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 8:16 pm

Brooklyn-based keyboardist and vocalist Xenia Rubinos likes to play with syncopation. Her debut album, Magic Trix, is based around rhythms that sometimes are identifiable as Caribbean, and at other times veer into the experimental.

"It's something I have a lot of fun with — just taking one rhythmic figure and turning it around as many ways as I can," Rubinos says. "That's a huge part of my compositional process, just messing around with something very simple and seeing how far I can take it."

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The Two-Way
1:00 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

As The Car Market Moves East, An Extravaganza In Shanghai

Models abound at this week's Shanghai auto show. This one, in a latex cat suit, was drawing attention to an SUV by Landwind, a Chinese company that sells about 10,000 vehicles a year.
Frank Langfitt NPR

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 9:59 am

If you visited the Shanghai and Detroit auto shows in recent years, you could sense the auto world's center of gravity shifting from West to East.

Around the time of the GM and Chrysler bankruptcies, I covered a show in Detroit where GM was actually shedding brands. Displays for Saturn and Hummer, which GM tried and failed to sell to a Chinese company, were pushed to the side in Detroit's Cobo Center like leftovers at a yard sale.

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Favorite Sessions
12:59 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Phosphorescent: An Understated, Epic 'Song For Zula'

Phosphorescent's Matthew Houck performs "Song for Zula" at WFUV in New York City.
Claire Lorenzo WFUV

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 3:05 pm

As worked into the opening line of the brilliant "Song for Zula" by Phosphorescent's Matthew Houck, the famous words "Love is a burning thing" set the scene for one of the best songs Houck has ever written.

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Monkey See
12:59 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

How 'The Office' Took A Scene From The Heart And Shot It In The Foot

John Krasinski and Jenna Fischer as Jim and Pam Halpert.
Chris Haston NBC

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 7:27 am

This has been a difficult year for The Office. There are only three episodes left after "Paper Airplanes," which aired Thursday night, and where 30 Rock rallied as it headed to the finish, The Office has seemed lost, particularly by devoting substantial time to world-building Dwight's beet farm, a remnant of a failed spin-off effort.

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The Two-Way
12:41 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Obama And O'Brien Take Jabs At Politics And Media (Highlights)

President Obama joked at the White House Correspondents' Dinner that he had experimented with bangs to liven up his second term, stealing a fashion tip from the first lady, Michelle Obama.
CSPAN

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 1:38 pm

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The Two-Way
8:24 am
Sun April 28, 2013

For Afghan Policewomen, Danger Often Comes From Colleagues

Afghan policewomen take part in a training exercise in the western province of Herat in 2011. Policewomen face frequent sexual harassment and assaults, often carried out by policemen, human rights groups say.
Sardar Xinhua/Landov

It seems almost trivial at first: the latest Human Rights Watch report on Afghanistan says female police officers need their own toilets. Sure, who's going to argue with that. But why is it a big deal?

Here's how it unfolds.

Female police officers are experiencing high levels of harassment, sexual assault and rape — often at the hands of their male colleagues. Where is most of this activity taking place? In police station bathrooms and changing rooms.

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The Two-Way
8:04 am
Sun April 28, 2013

Tamerlan Tsarnaev Spoke Of Jihad With Mother, Reports Say

Zubeidat Tsarnaeva, center, mother of Boston Marathon bombing suspects Tamerlan and Dzhokhar, reportedly spoke of radical ideas with her eldest son in 2011. Anzor Tsarnaeva, the boys' father, is on the left. At right is the boys' aunt, Patimat Suleymanova.
Getty Images Getty Images

Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev "vaguely discussed" jihad during a 2011 phone conversation with his mother, according to a U.S. official who described the recording to the Associated Press. The call, taped by a Russian government agency, reportedly did not include any mention of a plot inside the U.S.

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Asia
5:41 am
Sun April 28, 2013

N. Korean Refugees Tell Tales of Ordinary, Desperate Lives

Courtesy of Sokeel Park

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 5:40 pm

Sokeel Park sees the effects of North Korea's repressive government every day. He lives in South Korea, but works for an NGO named Liberty in North Korea. His job is to debrief those who've managed to leave the North and help them start new lives in the South.

Park says that with so much focus on the country's nuclear weapons and leadership, it's easy to forget about the 24 million people going about their everyday lives. Those lives are heavily controlled by the North Korean government, citizens are told where to work, where to live, and are not allowed to leave.

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