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Book Reviews
10:52 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Dorothea Lange's 'Migrant Mother' Inspires The Story Of 'Mary Coin'

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 12:00 pm

I shied away from Marisa Silver's new novel because of its book jacket: a reproduction of Dorothea Lange's iconic Depression-era photograph called "Migrant Mother." You know it: the woman's strong face is worn and worried; her children lean protectively into her. Lange took the photo at a pea-pickers' camp in California in 1936; the name of the destitute mother of seven, who wasn't identified till the 1970s, is Florence Owens Thompson. The photo on Silver's book jacket is colorized.

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NPR Story
10:52 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Digging Deeper On African American Leaders

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 11:11 am

You might think you know all there is to know about Martin Luther King Jr. But author Andrea Davis Pinkney digs deeper. She talks with host Michel Martin about her award-winning book, Hand in Hand: Ten Black Men Who Changed America.

NPR Story
10:52 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Black Reverend: Guns Are Important To My Church

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 11:11 am

Gun violence devastates many predominantly African-American neighborhoods in places across the country. But some faith leaders feel that legal access to guns is part of the solution, not the problem. Host Michel Martin speaks with Reverend Kenn Blanchard about why he wants his congregation to have wider access to guns.

NPR Story
10:52 am
Thu February 28, 2013

String Theory: Fascinating, Not Science Fiction

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 11:11 am

Tell Me More has been honoring Black History Month by speaking with African-Americans who've excelled in STEM fields — science, technology, engineering and math. Sylvester James Gates Jr. spent his career researching string theory. He explains to host Michel Martin that, while it seems like science fiction, it's really anything but.

It's All Politics
10:35 am
Thu February 28, 2013

How Washington Chose Not To Be Careful With Spending Cuts

Under sequestration, federal agencies don't have the flexibility to choose to spare popular programs or services by making administrative cuts elsewhere.
Tatiana Popova iStockphoto.com

Inconveniencing the public is part of the plan.

It may never have been intended to play out in quite this way, but the automatic spending cuts set to take effect for most federal programs Friday leave little room for preserving the most visible and popular programs.

"The law basically says the cuts have to be across-the-board by 'project, program and activity,' " says Stan Collender, a federal budget expert with the communications firm Qorvis. "That was specifically written to take away flexibility from the administration."

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The Two-Way
10:23 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Mastermind Of Great Train Robbery Dies

The Great Train Robbers (from left): Buster Edwards, Tom Wisbey, Jim White, Bruce Reynolds, Roger Cordrey, Charlie Wilson and Jim Hussey, with copies of their book The Train Robbers in 1979.
Michael Fresco Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 11:26 am

Bruce Reynolds, the brains behind the Great Train Robbery of 1963, has died at the age of 81, nearly five decades after he and his partners in crime made off with 2.6 million pounds at Ledburn, Buckinghamshire, England.

Reynolds was part of the gang that executed an elaborate scheme to swipe the cash from the Glasgow-to-Euston mail train. The clockwork nature of the crime, along with the fact that the bulk of the loot was never recovered and some of the robbers never captured, has made it a favorite subject of television and films, as well as popular music.

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The Salt
10:22 am
Thu February 28, 2013

China's Horses May End Up In Russia's Kabobs

The great horse meat scandal infographic.
via The Australian Institute of Food Safety

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 11:15 am

China isn't a good place to be a horse, if your goal is to avoid ending up as the Russian kabobs known as shashlik.

China exports the most horse meat to the global market, while Russia has the biggest appetite for horseflesh, according to a new infographic on the continuing European scandal over horse meat sold as beef.

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NPR Story
10:16 am
Thu February 28, 2013

FRIDAY: State Treasurer John N. Kennedy

State Treasurer John Kennedy talks with Jim about the Governor's 2013 proposed state budget and state government spending.

Audio should be posted by 11 am on Friday,  March 1

Copyright 2013 WRKF-FM. To see more, visit http://www.wrkf.org.

The Southern Education Desk
9:41 am
Thu February 28, 2013

When And Why School Districts Re-Segregate

Since the 1970s, federal court orders have governed how many Southern communities integrated their public schools. But new research shows, as those orders have been lifted, school districts are gradually re-segregating.


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Red River Radio
9:36 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Shreveport Remembers Native Son Van Cliburn

Shreveport is paying tribute to its native son Van Cliburn, the legendary pianist died Feb. 27 at his Fort Worth home. His early career was nurtured by the Shreveport Symphony community, and he never forgot that, according to Lester Senter Wilson. She’s been executive director of the Wideman International Piano Competition in Shreveport for 30 years. She said Cliburn played five times with the Shreveport Symphony, including a performance in 1972 when he celebrated the orchestra’s 25th anniversary.

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