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The Two-Way
11:21 am
Mon March 11, 2013

International Convention Moves To Limit Shark 'Finning' Trade

Indonesian fishermen unload their catch, including sharks and baby sharks, in Lampulo fish market in Banda Aceh last week.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 1:33 pm

Delegates to an international species conservation conference in Bangkok, Thailand, this week have agreed to limit the trade of shark fins and meat.

NPR's Christopher Joyce reports that government representatives to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, or CITES, have agreed to put the porbeagle, oceanic whitetip, three kinds of hammerhead shark and two kinds of manta ray on its Appendix II list, which places restrictions on fishing but still allows limited trade.

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The Two-Way
11:20 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Harvard Offers 'Partial Apology' For Email Search Of Resident Deans' Accounts

Jessica Rinaldi Reuters /Landov

Saying that the action was required because a confidential email that was leaked to the news media "threatened the privacy and due process afforded students," Harvard University administrators on Monday issued a statement explaining why they last year authorized searches of 16 resident deans' email accounts.

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The Two-Way
11:16 am
Mon March 11, 2013

President Obama's Older Half Brother Loses Election In Kenya

President Barack Obama's Kenyan half brother, Malik Obama (L) talks with some of his supporters on January 16.
Tony Karumba AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 11:28 am

There is one bit of news from last week's Kenyan elections that's just now getting international attention: Malik Obama, President Obama's older half brother, suffered a crushing loss in his bid to become governor of Siaya.

Kenya's Daily Nation reports:

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All Songs Considered
11:15 am
Mon March 11, 2013

SXSW 2013 Music Preview

Clockwise from upper left: Shakey Graves, Skewby, Hannah Georgas, Hiatus Kaiyote, Air Review, K-X-P
Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 4:07 pm

It's that time of year again! All Songs Considered is headed on another musical trek to Austin for this year's South By Southwest festival. Before hitting the road we listened to songs from more than a thousand bands scheduled to play the festival, in search of some great new discoveries. On this edition of the show hosts Bob Boilen and Robin Hilton, NPR Music editor Stephen Thompson and NPR Music critic Ann Powers come together to share some of what they found, and talk about the bands they're most excited to see.

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The Salt
11:15 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Edible Bonsai: East Meets West On These Cookie Canvases

Risa Hirai's bonsai cookies are made from sugar, flour, butter and egg. They're completely edible as long as they haven't been on display for too long.
Courtesy of Galerie Tokyo Humanité

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 4:37 pm

Risa Hirai is a Japanese artist who paints detailed images of bonsai trees and Japanese meals. But instead of using paint on a canvas, she works with icing on a cookie.

The 23-year-old is a senior at Tama Art University in Tokyo whose mouthwatering works will be exhibited at Gallery Tokyo Humanite all this week. Assistant director Maie Tsukuda tells The Salt it's the gallery's first cookie exhibit and notes that it's not an ordinary medium for artists.

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Shots - Health News
11:14 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Hardening Of Human Arteries Turns Out To Be A Very Old Story

A 3-D reconstruction of Mummy 38's CT scans shows calcification in her aorta and iliac arteries.
Courtesy of The Lancet

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 12:23 pm

Going "paleo" may not be the answer to heart disease, after all.

A few years ago, a team of researchers challenged our understanding of heart disease as a modern affliction. They found evidence of hardened arteries in the CT scans of ancient Egyptian mummies.

It was a little surprising since our predecessors didn't have fried chicken or cars.

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The Two-Way
11:13 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Former Detroit Mayor Kilpatrick Convicted On Corruption Charges

Former Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick on his way into court Monday in Detroit.
Regina H. Boone MCT /Landov

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 10:20 am

Former Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick, once a rising star in the Democratic Party, was convicted in a Detroit federal court Monday on a variety of corruption-related charges.

Here's how Michigan Radio sums up the news:

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Author Interviews
11:13 am
Mon March 11, 2013

'Frankenstein's Cat': Bioengineering The Animals Of The Future

Cover of Frankenstein's Cat

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 12:52 pm

In her new book, Frankenstein's Cat: Cuddling up to Biotech's Brave New Beasts, science journalist Emily Anthes talks about how the landscape of bioengineering has expanded since Dolly the Sheep was cloned in 1996. Scientists, she says, are now working to create pigs that can grow organs for human transplant, goats that produce valuable protein-rich milk, and cockroaches that could potentially serve as tiny scouts into danger zones for the military.

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The Picture Show
11:12 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Documenting West Texas And Big Bend National Park

Judy Majers, known as the Burro Lady
Courtesy of James H. Evans

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 10:07 am

Big Bend National Park lies in West Texas, surrounded by mountains and the Chihuahuan Desert. It's one of the least-visited national parks in the country, according to the National Parks Service.

For those simply passing through, it can be hard to capture the spirit of the place — which is why photographer James H. Evans moved there in 1988, and has never left.

"The big difference of living out here is that in the city the stars are on the ground, and here the stars are in the sky," Evans says over the phone.

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Author Interviews
11:12 am
Mon March 11, 2013

'Lean In': Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg Explains What's Holding Women Back

Courtesy Knopf

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 3:37 pm

Of all the posters plastered around Facebook's Silicon Valley headquarters — "Move Fast and Break Things," "Done Is Better Than Perfect" and "Fail Harder" — Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg has a favorite: "What Would You Do If You Weren't Afraid?"

"[It's] something that I think is really important and I think very motivating," Sandberg tells NPR's Renee Montagne. " ... I wrote in my book, what I would do if I wasn't afraid is, I would speak out more on behalf of women."

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