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It's All Politics
2:13 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Why Pols Like Eliot Spitzer Can't Quit Politics

Eliot Spitzer is surrounded by media Monday as he tries to collect signatures for his run for New York City comptroller. The former governor, who stepped down in 2008 amid a prostitution scandal, says he is planning a political comeback.
Seth Wenig AP

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 2:15 pm

It's a political ticket only Jon Stewart could dream up.

With Anthony Weiner leading the race for New York mayor in some polls, fellow Democrat Eliot Spitzer now hopes to appear on the same ballot in the city comptroller slot.

This latest news comes in a season that has already seen the return of South Carolina Republican Mark Sanford to the House.

"Sanford's success led to Weiner's reassessment, and Weiner's positive polls have led to Spitzer's thinking, 'Why not me?' " says Lara Brown, a political scientist who wrote a dissertation on congressional scandals.

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The Salt
2:03 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Sandwich Monday: The (Knockoff) Cronut

New York gave Chicago "the cronut," just as Chicago gave New York "Kanye West."
NPR

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 3:13 pm

By now, you've probably heard of cronuts, the half-doughnut, half-croissant pastry equivalent of a liger. They're so coveted, people line up for hours at the Dominique Ansel bakery in New York, where they're made, or they pay exorbitant sums on the cronut black market.

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NPR Story
1:45 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Politics This Week: Immigration, Student Loan Rates

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 2:27 pm

Congress is back from it’s Fourth of July recess. With only 15 laws passed so far this year, lawmakers will again take up immigration reform and the farm bill.

Senate Democrats are expected to hold a vote this week on a plan to extend the fixed 3.4 percent student loan rate for another year. The rate rose to 6.8 percent on July 1.

NPR’s senior Washington editor Ron Elving joins us for a preview of what to expect this week in politics.

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All Tech Considered
1:45 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Arrest Caught On Google Glass Reignites Privacy Debate

Filmmaker Chris Barrett wearing his Google Glass. He is among the first 1,000 nondeveloper testers of the product.
Jennifer Rubinovitz Courtesy of Chris Barrett

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:36 am

The Fourth of July holiday brought about another first for Google Glass, the computing device that you can wear on your face.

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The Two-Way
1:29 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Gov. Rick Perry Says He Won't Seek Re-Election In Texas

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 6:01 pm

Texas Gov. Rick Perry says he will not run for re-election in 2014, feeding speculation that he might again pursue the presidency as a Republican candidate in the 2016 race.

The governor made his announcement at a news conference Monday in San Antonio, which was carried live online by The Texas Tribune.

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NPR Story
1:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

A Pilot's Perspective On San Francisco Crash

A fire truck sprays water on Asiana Flight 214 after it crashed at San Francisco International Airport on Saturday, July 6, 2013, in San Francisco. (Noah Berger/AP)

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 11:15 am

Investigators are trying to determine whether pilot error was to blame in the deadly crash at San Francisco’s airport over the weekend.

The crash killed two people and sent more than 180 to hospitals.

Asiana Airlines has said that Lee Gang-guk, who was at the controls, had nearly 10,000 hours flying other planes but only 43 hours flying the Boeing 777. It was his first time landing that type of plane at that airport.

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NPR Story
1:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Crash Investigators: Did Jet Stall And Hit Sea Wall?

This aerial photo shows the wreckage of the Asiana Flight 214 airplane after it crashed at the San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco, Saturday, July 6, 2013. (Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP)

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 4:21 pm

Investigators say the Asiana Airlines jet that crashed at the San Francisco International Airport on Saturday, killing two passengers and sending more than 180 to hospitals, may have been on the verge of stalling because it was flying too slowly.

The plane clipped the sea wall as it came in for a landing, crashing onto the runway and breaking apart.

The airline said today that the pilot of the plane was experienced but was landing a Boeing 777 for the first time at San Francisco airport.

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The Two-Way
1:20 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Snowden: Americans Are Good; But Their Leaders Lie

Edward Snowden, seen during a video interview with The Guardian.
Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras EPA /LANDOV

When he went to work for the nation's spy agencies, "I believed in the goodness of what we were doing" and in the "nobility of our intentions to free oppressed people overseas," says the so-called NSA leaker, Edward Snowden, in a month-old video posted online Monday by The Guardian.

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Parallels
12:59 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Reversing Direction, Some Syrian Refugees Now Head Home

Refugees at the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan try to squeeze on one of the buses heading back to Syria. Syrian refugees have been coming to Jordan for two years, but some are now starting to head home.
Peter Breslow NPR

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:36 am

In the Jordanian desert, the chaos begins at sundown, when the wind whips up the desert sand and the buses arrive. For the past two years, Syrian refugees have been streaming into Jordan, and they now number an estimated half million.

But for the past month, more refugees have returned to Syria than entered Jordan, and hundreds are leaving daily from Zaatari, the U.N.'s largest refugee camp in Jordan.

"Four buses are going every day," says Kilian Kleinschmidt, who runs Zaatari. "Depending on how many people manage to storm the buses, it's probably 300 to 400 people."

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The Two-Way
12:53 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

A 'Mea Culpa'

Nina Totenberg
Steve Barrett NPR

I have always believed in correcting mistakes, especially bad ones. In my wrap-up piece at the end of the Supreme Court term, I quoted Northwestern University law professor John McGinnis as one of several conservative scholars highly critical of the court's decision on the Voting Rights Act.

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