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The Two-Way
4:22 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Obama Nominates Caroline Kennedy To Be Ambassador To Japan

Caroline Kennedy in February of 2013.
Slaven Vlasic Getty Images

President Obama has nominated Caroline Kennedy to serve as the United States' ambassador to Japan.

NPR's Mara Liasson filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"The daughter of President John F. Kennedy and an early and significant supporter of President Obama's, Kennedy is also an attorney and the author of several best-selling books. If confirmed she would fit a tradition for the Japan post — where many other prominent Americans have served. But she would be the first female ambassador to Japan.

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Code Switch
4:01 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

How The Death Of A 12-Year-Old Changed The City Of Dallas

Twelve-year-old Santos Rodriguez was shot and killed by a police officer in Dallas on July 24, 1973.
Courtesy of the Dallas Mexican American Historical League

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 6:21 pm

Forty years ago, thousands of Mexican-Americans in Dallas, Texas came together for a protest at city hall. Four days earlier, a white police officer had shot and killed 12-year-old Santos Rodriguez. The death of Rodriguez sparked a riot. Eventually, it later spurred change that led to political representation and more Mexican-Americans on the police force.

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The Two-Way
3:50 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

In First Public Mass In Brazil, Pope Francis Urges Humility, Charity

Pope Francis celebrates Mass at the Basilica of the National Shrine of Our Lady Aparecida on Wednesday in Aparecida, Brazil.
Buda Mendes Getty Images

Pope Francis continued a whirlwind tour of Brazil today, delivering his first public mass in the town of Aparecida.

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Shots - Health News
3:45 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

How A Family Copes With Schizophrenia And Suicide

Homer Bell's family: sister Laura Bell (from left), sister Regina Bell, mother Rosalind Scott and stepfather Jack Wilcox.
Jeff Cohen WNPR

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 6:21 pm

Homer Bell was 54 years old when he killed himself in April in a very public way — he laid down his head in front of a stopped bus in his hometown of Hartford, Conn. It was the last act in a life filled with struggle, as Bell and his family endured his schizophrenia.

At a time when there are calls to strengthen the mental health system, Bell's story shows how hard coping with mental illness can be.

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Education
3:45 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Senate Passes Student Loan Legislation To Lower Interest Rates

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 8:31 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

After a long wait, the Senate has finally passed student loan legislation. It would restore lower interest rates for undergraduates. Many of them saw their rates double on July 1st when the Senate missed its deadline.

As NPR's Ailsa Chang reports, the new measure closely resembles both what the president wanted and what the House has already passed.

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Around the Nation
3:45 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

'Bat Cave' Road In Chicago Accessible To Only A Few

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 6:21 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

In Chicago, there's a two-and-a-half-mile roadway that the mayor calls the Bat Cave. It's been around for more than a decade, but it's not well known. The mini-highway was designed to ferry conventioneers to Chicago's convention hall.

But as NPR's Cheryl Corley reports, some local politicians are arguing that the Bat Cave is being reserved for politicians with special clout.

(SOUNDBITE OF VEHICLES)

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NPR Story
3:04 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Why Is Galesburg So Popular With Presidents?

President Barack Obama visits the Galesburg High School football team, Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2011, in Galesburg, Ill., during his three-day economic bus tour. (Carolyn Kaster/AP)

If you’re wondering why President Obama is in Galesburg, Illinois, he has been there before and it turns out he’s not the only president or future president to visit the small prairie town west of Chicago.

Fifteen men who were either in the nation’s highest office or went on to become president have made stops in Galesburg.

The first future President to visit was Abraham Lincoln in 1858 when he was running for the U.S. Senate.

One of the famous Lincoln-Douglas debates was held on the Knox College campus that President Obama is visiting today.

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NPR Story
3:04 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

President Obama Shifts Focus To The Economy

President Barack Obama waves as he boards Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., Wednesday, July 24, 2013. Obama is traveling to Knox College in Galesburg, Ill., to kick off a series of speeches that will lay out his vision for rebuilding the economy. (Cliff Owen/AP)

NPR’s national political correspondent Mara Liasson joins us to talk about the politics of President Obama’s economic speech at Knox College in Galesburg, Illinois.

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NPR Story
3:04 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Growing Up Royal

0724_Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, then Princess Elizabeth, center, waves as she stands on the balcony of Buckingham Palace, London, with her grandparents King George V and Queen Mary, in this May 6, 1935 photo. Princess Margaret is just visible over the balcony edge. (AP)

The infant prince, third in line to the British throne, is now home with his parents, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.

His life will be one of privilege, of course, but also one of formal duty and protocol.

For some perspective, consider the childhood of his great-grandmother, Queen Elizabeth, who grew up during World War II. The Queen visited her great-grandson for the first time today.

The BBC’s Nicola Stanbridge reports on the life of an heir to the throne.

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Shots - Health News
2:18 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Plan B To Hit Shelves, Protected From Generics

The Plan B One-Step morning-after pill will now be available to women as young as 15 without a prescription, and will have another three years of protection from generic competition.
AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 4:54 pm

As expected, the Food and Drug Administration has granted an additional three years of protection from generic competition to the makers of the most popular form of the emergency contraceptive pill,

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