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7:27 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

NPR, Ombudsman Differ On S. Dakota Indian Foster Care Series

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 6:14 am

After an extensive investigation lasting well over a year, NPR's ombudsman has concluded the network's series on South Dakota's efforts to put Native American children in foster care was fundamentally flawed.

The network and the ombudsman, Edward Schumacher-Matos, who is paid to critique NPR's news coverage, have split sharply over his findings.

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Around the Nation
7:27 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Firefighting's First Female General Makes Order Out Of Chaos

Jeanne Pincha-Tulley, a Type 1 incident commander, addresses the media in the then-evacuated town of Idyllwild, as the Mountain Fire grows closer. Pincha-Tulley has a reputation for being frank and direct with the media and public. "For the next two days," she said, "the fire is going to put embers right over this town."
Nate Rott NPR

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:55 pm

A line of dirty fire engines rumbles off of Southern California's Pine to Palms Highway into an open field, trailing a cloud of brown dust. The drivers' faces are smudged with black soot.

Across the road, helicopters land to fill with water and fuel before whacking their way back up through the smoky sky. The scenic San Jacinto Mountains behind them are bare and black, burnt clean of tree and bush. Puffs of gray smoke rise like faint ghosts.

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All Songs Considered
7:27 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Question Of The Week: What Are The Best Apps For Making Music?

Apple's Garage Band for the iPad and iPhone includes virtual instruments, such as piano and drums, you can play like the real thing.
 

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 9:57 am

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Tiny Desk Concerts
7:26 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Alpine: Tiny Desk Concert

Alpine performs at a Tiny Desk Concert in June 2013.
Chloe Coleman Chloe Coleman/NPR

Originally published on Mon December 23, 2013 5:17 pm

Alpine's music doesn't instantly present itself as Tiny Desk material: The Australian sextet crafts busily impeccable pop music with a danceable sway, prominent synths and the charming shared lead vocals of Phoebe Baker and Lou James. That's a lot of ingredients to strip down to a semi-acoustic set in the NPR Music offices; there's virtually no margin for error.

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NPR Story
7:26 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

New Epilepsy Research Could Lead To Targeted Treatments

Tracy Dixon-Salazar, right, with her daughter Savannah, who suffers from Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome, a childhood epilepsy. (Courtesy of the family)

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 5:29 pm

New genetic research could provide life-changing treatments for the approximately 50 million people with epilepsy worldwide.

A study in the journal Nature has identified two genes and 25 mutations associated with the most serious forms of epilepsy.

By identifying these genes, doctors can develop targeted treatments.

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NPR Story
7:25 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Dissing Oprah: How Race And Size Bias Affect Business

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 5:29 pm

Oprah Winfrey’s story of discrimination has sparked much discussion about how racism plays into retail bias.

Oprah told Entertainment Tonight that she was visiting a high-end store in Zurich, Swizerland, and the sales assistant refused to show her a $38,000 handbag.

The Guardian’s economics editor Heidi Moore wrote a piece in response called, “Oprah faced not just fashion retail racism, but size bias too.”

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NPR Story
7:23 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Debating The Future Of Florida's 'Stand Your Ground' Law

Dream Defenders and their supporters protest Friday, July 26, 2013 outside Florida Gov. Rick Scott's office in the Capitol in Tallahassee, Fla. (Phil Sears/AP)

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 5:29 pm

The activist group Dream Defenders has been occupying the Florida capital building for almost a month.

The group, which describes itself as “an organization directed by Black & Brown Youth, who confront systemic inequality by building our collective power,” is demanding that legislators repeal Florida’s “stand your ground” law.

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NPR Story
7:23 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Federal Judge: NYC's Stop-And-Frisk Policy Violates Constitution

People hold signs during a silent march to end the "stop-and-frisk" program in New York, Sunday, June 17, 2012. Thousands of protesters from civil rights groups walked down New York City’s Fifth Avenue in total silence on Sunday as they marched in defiance of “stop-and-frisk” tactics employed by city police. (Seth Wenig/AP)

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 5:29 pm

A federal judge in New York has issued a decision that calls for a federal monitor of the New York City Police Department, to prevent the department from violating the civil rights of residents.

The judge, Shira Scheindlin, says New York City police officers for years have been systematically stopping innocent people on the street.

She says the stop-and-frisk actions, which increased over the last decade — even as crime declined — violate both the 4th and 14th amendments of the Constitution.

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NPR Story
7:23 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Glut Of Lobster Brings Price To A 20-Year Low In Maine

Scott Beede returns an undersized lobster while checking traps in Mount Desert, Maine, May 21, 2012. (Robert F. Bukaty/AP)

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 5:29 pm

Global warming and other factors are causing an oversupply of lobsters in Maine.

Canada, which is the largest importer of Maine lobster meat, experienced an early season and its own glut of lobsters due to warming waters.

Maine lobstermen have seen an 80 percent increase in their own bounty over the past few years.

The result is that prices have dropped to about half since 2007, says eighth generation lobsterman Jason Joyce of Swan’s Island Maine.

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NPR Story
7:22 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Ethiopian Women And Girls Find Work In Construction

Mekedes Getachew, 19, has been working at construction sites in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, since she was 15 years old. Except for the heaviest lifting, she says, the laborers "all do the same work and we don't really say this is a man's job, but when it comes to salary there's a difference." She earns $1.50 a day. Men earn $2. (Gregory Warner/NPR)

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 5:29 pm

Ethiopia is one of the fastest growing economies in the world. But behind the statistics and the figures is a cultural shift in a traditional society.

The vast demand for construction labor is drawing women into an industry dominated by men.

NPR’s Gregory Warner profiles one young worker and her quest to find a space of her own in the new Ethiopia.

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