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The Two-Way
5:43 am
Fri August 16, 2013

In Egypt: 'Day Of Rage' Adds To Body Count

A man in Cairo who said he had been wounded by a rubber bullet Friday gets help.
Andre Pain EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 9:55 pm

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Peter Kenyon, in Cairo, talks with host David Greene

(We updated the top of this post at 4:50 p.m. ET. For other updates, click here.)

With the Muslim Brotherhood marching in Cairo and other Egyptian cities in a "day of rage" over the deadly crackdown on supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi, this week's alarming body count went higher on Friday.

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Business
4:45 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Ford Lowers Mileage Rating On C-Max Hybrid

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with an EPA crackdown.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: Ford Motor Company will reduce the fuel economy sticker on its new C-Max hybrid to 43 miles per gallon, down from its earlier estimate of 47.

As Michigan Radio's Tracy Samilton reports, the change has generated a new review of fuel economy testing standards.

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Race
4:45 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Chinatown's 'White Devil John' Sentenced To 20 Years

John Willis, also known as "White Devil John" in Cantonese, was sentenced to 20 years in prison for money laundering and drug charges.
Jane Collins for NPR

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 2:29 pm

The conviction this week of mob boss James "Whitey" Bulger put an end to one of Boston's highest-profile crime sagas.

Less well-known, though, is the case of John Willis, a white man from Dorchester, Mass., who was sentenced in federal court on Thursday to 20 years in prison for drug trafficking and money laundering.

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Africa
4:45 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Doctors Without Borders To Pull Out Of Somalia

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 4:52 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Somalia is a country that has long been plagued by horrific violence, where even humanitarian groups are targeted. Just a month ago, two workers from Doctors Without Borders were released after 21 months in captivity. The group has had 16 staff killed in their 22 years operating in Somalia. Well, now Doctors Without Borders says it has had enough. For just the second time in its history, the group is completely pulling out of a country because of safety concerns.

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Food
1:57 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Demystifying Saffron: Mark Bittman Explains The Pricey Spice

Marilyn Barbone iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 3:25 pm

In the latest installment of NPR's Cook Your Cupboard, New York Times columnist and cookbook author Mark Bittman sheds a little light on saffron — a spice that has been stumping Lennet Radke in Wisconsin. Radke, who received a little jar in a contest, says she's never really used it. The stuff isn't cheap. And that knowledge alone can stifle experimentation.

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StoryCorps
1:56 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Riding Choppers And Harleys To Protect Kids In Need

Happy Dodson (left) and Taz Roman are president and treasurer, respectively, of the Connecticut chapter of Bikers Against Child Abuse.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 10:36 am

Happy Dodson and Taz Roman are bikers. Not cyclists, but the leather jacket and chained wallet kind of bikers. They're also members of a group called Bikers Against Child Abuse.

The nonprofit, with chapters across the U.S. and in some parts of Europe, accepts referrals from parents, guardians, police, social workers and other agencies. Whenever those kids don't feel safe, they can call Happy, Taz and their other biker friends, who come straight to the child's house.

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All Tech Considered
1:55 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Herzog Plumbs Guilt And Loss Wrought By Texting And Driving

Reggie Shaw killed two men while he was texting on a Utah highway. He now speaks to groups about the dangers of texting and driving.
ShareATT YouTube

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 3:31 pm

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All Tech Considered
1:53 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Tornado Tech: How Drones Can Help With Twister Science

Drones can provide information about temperature, humidity and pressure that current radar systems can't provide. Above, the Talos drone, which has a 15.5-foot wingspan.
Jamey Jacob Oklahoma State University

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 10:15 am

Oklahoma was hit particularly hard by two massive outbreaks this year in what's been another deadly season of tornadoes in the U.S. Despite technology and forecasting improvements, scientists still have plenty to learn about how and why tornadoes form.

Currently, one of the best ways for researchers to understand how tornadoes form is to chase them. So off they go with mobile science laboratories, rushing toward storms armed with research equipment and weather-sensing probes.

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Animals
1:53 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Wild Horses Run Free As Adoption Centers Fill Up

Katrina Boydon and her mustang Spirit. She adopted the horse as an orphaned foal with a rattlesnake bite on his hoof.
Will Stone KUNR

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 5:52 am

Drive about 20 miles north of Reno, Nev., into the barren scrubland and you're sure to see "wild" horses — more than 1,000, in fact. Just not in the wild.

Laura Leigh calls several mares to the edge of the dusty corral. She's a regular at Palomino Valley National Adoption Center. The horses eagerly rub their muzzles against her, their coats hot from the midday sun.

"We got to get you a home, don't we?" she says to one of the horses. "This one will let you scratch her withers and put your hands on her legs. You're adorable, aren't you?"

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The Salt
1:52 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Why This Year's Blueberry Bounty Has Growers Feeling Blue

Picker Erika Nicolas Garcia, 18, fills her pail at a blueberry farm near Hillsboro, Ore.
Anna King Northwest Public Radio

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 9:52 am

The blueberries on your morning cereal are less expensive this year. That's because farmers are harvesting a bumper crop this summer. It's good news for berry lovers, but the bounty might wreck some blueberry growers.

In Richland, Wash., Genoa Blankenship pops open the lid on a box of blueberries. Her three young children struggle to stop wiggling. Blankenship loves the idea of healthy snacks that are easy to take along to soccer practice.

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