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All Tech Considered
1:08 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Use This Site To Delete Old Accounts You Don't Use Anymore

Direct links to deleting your old accounts, all on one page.
Screengrab of JustDelete.Me

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 6:51 pm

It's hard to know how many online accounts and services each of us has created by now, but it's probably somewhere in the neighborhood of "too many." This proliferation of online accounts has grown a whole crop of password-remembering services that, of course, also require accounts.

It would be great to cut the clutter by just deleting the ones you don't use. But companies don't make it easy, burying the account deactivation pages from view and requiring a litany of frustrating steps to get there.

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The Two-Way
1:07 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

First Female Member Of New York Stock Exchange Dies

Muriel Siebert stands on the trading floor of her discount brokerage and underwriting firm in New York on May 9,1995. Siebert died Saturday in New York. She was 80.
Wyatt Counts AP

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 11:41 pm

The first woman to buy a seat on the New York Stock Exchange and head one of its member firms has died.

Muriel "Mickie" Siebert died Saturday in New York at age 80, The New York Times reports. The cause was complications of cancer.

Here's more from The Times:

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Books
1:05 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

'Heart' Of Iranian Identity Reimagined For A New Generation

In "The Nightmare of Siavosh," the young exiled Iranian prince dreams of his impending demise. Upon waking, he tells his wife, Farigis, about his fears regarding the tragic events to come.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 6:14 am

A thousand years ago, a Persian poet named Abolqasem Ferdowsi of Tous obtained a royal commission to put the ancient legends and myths of Iran into a book of verse.

He called this epic Shahnameh, or "Epic of the Persian Kings." It took him more than three decades and comprises 60,000 couplets — twice the length of The Iliad and The Odyssey combined.

Author Azar Nafisi, who wrote the memoir Reading Lolita in Tehran, says the importance of this foundational myth epic to Iranians can't really be overstated.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
1:05 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Seeing Music For What It Is

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 2:32 pm

Music is not sound art, even though musical ideas find natural expression in melody and harmony, timbre and rhythm. Music may be carried in sound, but only in the way that our applause at a concert is carried in sound. Applause is clapping; it is stomping and shouting. These are noisy, but they are not noise. They are not sound as a physicist might think of sound. Music is to sound as gesture is to mere movement. Physics is only part of the story.

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Religion
1:04 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Ancient African Religion Finds Roots In America

Priest Ifagbemi has an elaborate shrine to Yoruba's gods in his home near Seattle.
Christopher Johnson NPR

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 12:05 pm

In the suburbs of Seattle, an ancient West-African religion is gaining followers. Yoruba, from the Yoruba people of Nigeria, has been spreading across the U.S. for the last 50 years.

The religion is particularly popular with African-Americans who find it offers a spiritual path and a deep sense of cultural belonging.

Looking For Answers

Wesley Hurt's Yoruba story begins the night he met his wife, Cheri Profit. It was nearly eight years ago, not long after a tour in Iraq. He had just gotten off for weekend release from an Army base in Tacoma, Wash.

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The Sunday Conversation
1:04 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Hospice Doctor Helps Families Navigate The End Of Life

Dr. David Casarett was inspired by his father's death to specialize in end of life care.
Joe Chielli

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 10:22 am

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Dr. David Casarett is the director of hospice care at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. He works with families as they try to navigate end-of-life decisions.

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Author Interviews
1:04 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Haitian Youth Illuminated In 'Sea Light'

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 10:22 am

On her 7th birthday, a little girl named Claire disappears in a seaside Haitian village. Through Claire's fictional journey, award-winning author Edwidge Danticat shares glimmers of her own childhood in Haiti.

In Claire of the Sea Light, the protagonist's mother died during childbirth, and her father is a poor fisherman, struggling to make ends meet. Just moments before his daughter disappears, Claire's father had agreed to let a local woman adopt her in hopes of giving his daughter a better life.

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Music Interviews
1:04 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Black Joe Lewis And His Band Stay The Course, Lose The Name

Black Joe Lewis' new album is Electric Slave.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 10:22 am

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Sunday Puzzle
1:03 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

It's All Greek To Me

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 10:22 am

On-air challenge: You're given some sentences. Each sentence conceals the name of a language in consecutive letters. Name the language. Each answer has five or more letters.

Last week's challenge: The Roman numeral for 38 is XXXVIII. What is special or unusual about this Roman numeral that sets it apart from every other Roman numeral that can be written?

Answer: If every possible Roman numeral were listed in alphabetical order, XXXVIII would be last.

Winner: Joseph Kuperberg of Pittsford, N.Y.

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PG-13: Risky Reads
1:01 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Braving Both Napoleonic France And Teenage Angst With Aplomb

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 9:57 am

Fiona Maazel's latest novel is Woke Up Lonely.

The way my mom likes to tell it, I wasn't much of a reader growing up. My chief complaint of every book she dumped in my lap was that nothing happens. Ten pages in and no one had died.

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