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NPR Ed
4:03 am
Wed June 3, 2015

Free Online Test-Prep For The SAT

The College Board has announced a partnership with Khan Academy to make prep materials for the SAT college-entrance exam available free online.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 3, 2015 6:59 am

The SAT is undergoing major changes for 2016.

And, as of today, students — for free — can tap into new online study prep tools from Khan Academy, the online education nonprofit.

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It's All Politics
4:03 am
Wed June 3, 2015

Why Jeb Bush Can't Bank On Faith Like His Brother Did

Jeb Bush, seen here bowing his head in prayer as governor of Florida in 2000, is deeply religious. "Twenty years ago I converted to Catholicism," Bush said last month. "It was one of the smartest things I've done in my whole life."
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 3, 2015 7:45 am

Evangelical voters are a major force in Iowa Republican politics. A force that can tip the balance in the state's marquee event: the first-in-the-nation Iowa caucuses.

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Goats and Soda
4:03 am
Wed June 3, 2015

Classes Canceled, 1,300 Quarantined In S. Korea's Scramble To Stop MERS

Since the first case on May 20, confirmed cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, have swelled to at least 30 in South Korea.
Chung Sung-Jun Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 3, 2015 6:59 am

More than 1,300 people in South Korea are under mandatory quarantine as health officials scramble to contain the largest outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, outside the Arabian Peninsula. So far, at least 30 people in South Korea have contracted the virus, which has no known vaccine or cure. Two of them have died since the outbreak began May 20.

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NPR Story
3:03 am
Wed June 3, 2015

Barrel of Monkeys: House Links Tax Bills

Copyright 2015 WRKF-FM. To see more, visit http://www.wrkf.org.

U.S.
2:48 am
Wed June 3, 2015

Most Commuter Rails Won't Meet Deadline For Mandated Safety Systems

Despite Congress mandating all railroads be equipped with a Positive Train Control system by the end of the year, Chicago's Metra system isn't expected to reach that goal until 2019. Most commuter trains won't meet the deadline.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Wed June 3, 2015 6:59 am

Many investigators say Positive Train Control (PTC), an automated safety system, could have prevented last month's Amtrak train derailment. Amtrak officials have said they will have PTC installed throughout the northeast corridor by the end of this year, which is the deadline mandated by Congress.

But the vast majority of other commuter railroad systems, which provided nearly 500 million rides in 2014, won't be able to fully implement positive train control for several more years.

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All Tech Considered
2:47 am
Wed June 3, 2015

A Taxi App Aims To Build Trust Where Crime Is High

Traffic stands still in Nairobi. People in Kenya's capital don't like getting into cabs driven by strangers. They prefer to call drivers they know or who their friends recommend.
Goran Tomasevic Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed June 3, 2015 6:59 am

It's a problem in a taxi economy if people don't like getting into cabs that are driven by strangers. A cab driver is a stranger almost by definition. But in the high-crime city of Nairobi, Kenya, people prefer to call up drivers they know or who their friends recommend.

An American named Jason Eisen spent years in Nairobi as a consultant until he had his big idea. He built an app that doesn't just tell you which taxis are close by, like Uber does. It also assigns the driver a trust score, by scouring riders' contacts and social media.

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Shots - Health News
2:46 am
Wed June 3, 2015

Emergency Rooms Crack Down On Abusers Of Pain Pills

In Cheyenne, Wyo., emergency room patients who show up more than a few times a month requesting pain pills will now be told no, except in dire emergencies. A similar program at a New Mexico hospital cut ER visits by 5 percent annually, and saved $500,000.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed June 3, 2015 6:59 am

Kimberley Enyart was never interested in doing recreational drugs. But then she was in a car accident and her doctor prescribed a powerful opiate for the pain.

"It just would put me off in la-la land, and make me feel better," she says. "I loved it. I loved that high."

When Enyart's prescription ran out she did whatever she could to convince other doctors that she needed more. Eventually, she moved on to dentists.

"I even had two back teeth pulled over it," she says.

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Shots - Health News
2:45 am
Wed June 3, 2015

Are The Vaccine Court's Requirements Too Strict?

Nicholas Wildman and his mom, Mary Wildman, in 2015.
Courtesy of Mary Wildman

Originally published on Wed June 3, 2015 6:59 am

Imagine that you're a judge, and you're asked to decide the case brought by Mary and Dave Wildman.

Back in 1997, Mary took the couple's 1-year-old son, Nicholas, to the doctor for the combination-vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella. Right after the MMR shot, Mary says, Nicholas started crying uncontrollably.

"This was unbelievable screaming," she says.

Mary and her mom started driving Nicholas back to their home in Evans City, Pa.

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Business
1:41 am
Wed June 3, 2015

Marketplace Tech for Wednesday, June 3, 2015

An aerial view of St. Petersburg. On today's show, we'll talk about an internet trolling group called The Agency based out of St. Petersburg in Russia.
Marketplace
Business
12:00 am
Wed June 3, 2015

Marketplace Morning Report for Wednesday, June 3, 2015

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