State and National News

Is Houston Prepared For The Next Big Storm?

14 hours ago

It’s been nearly five months since Hurricane Harvey devastated Houston. Rebuilding efforts are far from over and many questions remain about the city’s vulnerability to floods, its preparedness and what could have been done differently. Officials did not issue a widespread mandatory evacuation before or during Harvey, and more than 60,000 people had to be rescued from Houston and surrounding Harris County. Now, some experts fear that many Houstonians won’t know what to do when the next hurricane comes.

Clock Is Ticking Toward Government Shutdown

14 hours ago

The federal government will partially shutdown Friday night unless Congress approves a spending plan. Democrats also want to get a resolution to the DACA program that covers people brought illegally to the U.S. as children.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young get the latest on the negotiations with NPR’s Jessica Taylor (@JessicaTaylor).

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

A tablespoon of soil contains billions of microscopic organisms. Life on Earth, especially the growing of food, depends on these microbes, but scientists don't even have names for most of them, much less a description.

That's changing, slowly, thanks to researchers like Noah Fierer, at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Fierer think microbes have lived in obscurity for too long. "They do a lot of important things for us, directly or indirectly, and I hope they get the respect they deserve," he says.

On Thursday, USA Gymnastics announced they will stop using the Karolyi Ranch — the site of many of the atrocities committed against Olympians by Larry Nassar, the team's former doctor. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks to New York Times reporter, Juliet Macur about what happens next as Nassar faces sentencing hearings this week.

One year later: we check in on the refugee settlement in Erie, Pennsylvania

17 hours ago

In January of 2017, Marketplace traveled to Erie, Pennsylvania to do a live show the day before President Trump's inauguration as part of our series The Big Promise. The particular politics of Erie, voting twice for President Obama and then for Trump, have made it a microcosm of the larger political and socioeconomic climate in America. That includes the way its economy has changed over the past couple of decades -- specifically, the number of immigrants and refugees who joined the workforce.

You may need to get used to the threat of government shutdown

17 hours ago

There is currently no plan to fund the federal government beyond tomorrow. Lawmakers have yet to agree on a continuing resolution to fund the government. The deadline to do so is this Friday at midnight. To get a sense of how budget negotiations used to go—and whether we can expect the current state of affairs to be the new normal—Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal spoke with Stan Collender, professor of public policy at Georgetown. 

The NFL playoffs are down to the final four teams, and the matchup for Super Bowl LII will be set after Sunday’s conference title games.

Here we are again. No federal budget, no government funding beyond the next day or so. There was a time when this state of affairs was brushed off as congressional legislators simply kicking the can down the road, that they'd come to their senses and be, y'know, responsible. But those days seem to be gone, and this economy's getting by on a never-ending series of four-week budget stopgaps. That's how we're starting the show today. Then: a check on the White House's infrastructure plan, which is expected in the next few weeks.

Mick Mulvaney doesn’t think the CFPB needs more money

20 hours ago

Mick Mulvaney, the director of the Office of Management and Budget and the acting director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, sent an unusual letter to Fed Chair Janet Yellen yesterday. The CFPB gets its funding from the Federal Reserve like other government bureaus, so each quarter it requests money to keep the bureau going. However, this time no money was requested for the second quarter of this fiscal year.  

That’s right, Mulvaney requested $0 for the CFPB.

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