Imagine a room full of boys and girls enthralled in playing a game that’s not on video. It’s not even electronic. The game began about a thousand years ago – give or take a century.

Restaurants near the Lafitte Greenway are seeing a different kind of customer since the bike path opened. Po-boy purveyor Parkway Tavern & Bakery is one of them.
Ian McNulty

Look around the streets of New Orleans these days and it's impossible to miss that more people are traversing the city on bicycles.

Some restaurants and bars are noticing too, and nowhere more than a part of Mid-City that's becoming a crossroads of bike paths, a destination for in-town outings and, on nice days, a hub for people making the rounds by pedal power.

Dionne Grayson / It's New Orleans

For the past few years, with all the Hollywood folks in town, it’s not unusual for someone at Whole Foods in New Orleans to whisper, “Do you know who that is?” It’s usually a celebrity who looks quite different in the cereal aisle from how she looks on the screen.

Today on Out to Lunch Peter's playing a business version of "Do you know who that is?"

This week the Charles Koch Institute hosts a national summit in New Orleans on criminal justice reform. Yes, that's Koch as in conservative backers the Koch brothers. Called Advancing Justice, the summit draws a wide range of political perspectives.

Vikrant Reddy is a senior research fellow at the Charles Koch Institute. He says the U.S. is in a hot moment for prison and policing reform.

Ben Jaffe, Gwen Thompkins and Charlie Gabriel.
Amanda Irizarry / Elephant Quilt Productions

Giants of traditional jazz played here; hell, they still play here: tucked behind walls with a patina worthy of the temple Preservation Hall has been through the years.

The doors opened in 1961. This was to be a sanctuary for America’s original music, born on the banks of the Mississippi. Here, the original sound of jazz would echo down St. Peter Street, even as rock ‘n’ roll swallowed radio.

The Historic New Orleans Collection, 1974.25.23.4

This story is part of TriPod: New Orleans at 300. Tripod moves beyond the familiar themes of New Orleans history to focus on forgotten, neglected, or surprising pieces of the city's past to help us better understand present and future challenges. This story visits physical landmarks that bear witness to the city’s role in the national slave trade.

John Richie

The debate over gun safety is often presented as a black and white issue, with people either strongly for or against strict gun laws. But local filmmaker John Richie found that wasn’t the case.

This week on Inside the Arts... conversation with world renowned violinist Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg. 

Then, Southern Rep Theatre gears up for the world premiere of Song of a Man Coming Through.  The stage drama is based on the true story of a Louisiana convicted murderer and the legal team that reluctantly became his greatest advocates. We talk with nationally acclaimed actor and Louisiana native Lance Nichols and Southern Rep's artistic director Aimee Hayes.

The 10th Annual Louisiana Smart Growth Summit explores best practices for statewide planning. The Center for Planning and Excellence, CPEX, runs the event Tuesday and Wednesday in Baton Rouge.

CPEX CEO Elizabeth Boo Thomas says what Louisiana really needs is transportation and housing.

This week on The Reading Life: Cheryl Gerber talks about her carefully selected book of photographs, New Orleans: Life and Death in the Big Easy, and Kristin Hersh remembers the life of a good friend in Don't Suck, Don't Die: Giving Up Vic Chesnutt.

*Note: The New Orleans Book Festival on 11/7 has been canceled due to impending weather.  Also, the Suzanne Rheinstein book even on 11/9 has been canceled.