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St. John the Baptist Parish

St. John the Baptist is the latest parish to file a lawsuit against oil and gas companies. Parish officials say the industry is partially to blame for coastal land loss.

 

It’s the latest move in a long saga as the suits make their way through various courts.

Charles Lloyd
American Routes

Each week, American Routes brings you Shortcuts, a sneak peek at our upcoming show. This week, we visit with modern saxophonist Charles Lloyd. He played alongside everyone from Ornette Coleman to the Beach Boys. But before all that, Charles Lloyd discovered his love for the saxophone in the blues, in his hometown of Memphis. To hear the full program, join us Saturdays at 7 or Sundays at 6 on WWNO, or listen at Americanroutes.org

Photo by Ian McNulty - The gumbo at Dunbar's Creole Cuisine is loaded with meat and seafood.
Ian McNulty

No two bowls of gumbo should be exactly the same. Heck, even when they’re served from the same pot the precise mixture of seafood and meat and seasoning may differ from bowl to bowl, based on the luck of the ladle.  This is certainly the case with Creole gumbo, a down-home style sometimes described as kitchen sink.

And yet, even for the endless gumbo variations out there, sometimes an overarching house style for a particular gumbo can speak to you in a voice you may recognize even years after your last taste. 

That’s just how food memories are wired, and that was my experience recently over a bowl of gumbo at Dunbar's Creole Cuisine. 

Mike Mozart (flickr) (CC BY 2.0)

Gas prices usually rise in the spring and peak around Memorial Day. That’s because refineries make more expensive blends for summer. Last week, though, prices leveled off early.

 

Though prices have been a little less predictable this year, the cause of that unpredictability could actually be good for the Louisiana oil and gas industry.

D. Sharon Pruitt / Hill Air Force Base

In the counseling field, you often hear that suicide is a permanent solution to a temporary problem. That truism resonates especially with the volunteers of Teen Life Counts, a teen suicide prevention program here in New Orleans. To get the full story, NolaVie’s Brian Friedman sat down with Melissa Stewart, the program’s coordinator.

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Brian Friedman.

Pat Denton Collection, Newcomb Archives Tulane.

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with part II of its series on the battle over the Equal Rights Amendment. Listen to Part I here.

The St. Claude Street Bridge raises as a barge passes beneath it.
Thomas Walsh / WWNO

Southeastern Louisiana relies on federal funds to keep it a viable place to live. That means constant construction; roads, levees, and the latest project, a $951 million dollar plan to widen the Industrial Canal. The Army Corps of Engineers has reached out to the surrounding communities for input and the proposal is wildly unpopular. The Listening Post wanted to hear both sides of the debate. 

The Listening Post asked:

1) What kind of input should communities have on federal projects like these?

This week on Inside the Arts, Jazz Fest 2017 kicks off with a celebration of Cuba! We explore music, food and art in this historic cultural exchange.

Then, something new weekday afternoons between the weekends of Jazz Fest.  Maple Leaf Bar Interviews at Frenchy's will bring audiences closer to legendary New Orleans musicians.  WWNO's Fred Kasten will highlight George Porter, Jr., Johnny Vidacovich and Ellis Marsalis.

And, we round out with a concert of classical music with LPO cellist Jeanne Jaubert and friends in the Marigny.

This week on The Reading Life: Poet Rodney Jones, author of Village Prodigies, and New York Times bestselling novelist Claudia Gray, whose new young adult series begins with Defy the Stars.

**Lagniappe Audio**

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Contractors dressed in flak jackets and helmets took down one of New Orleans’ Confederate monuments early Monday morning. 

It was removed with no notice in the middle of the night, partly because the process has been so controversial. Protestors and supporters of the Liberty Place monument yelled as it was removed. The obelisk was put up in the 1800's by a white supremacy group.

Tucked on a back street near the Aquarium, it was the first of four the city plans to remove.

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