News

A new survey from the University of New Orleans shows little support for the US Senate campaign of former Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard David Duke. 

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

New Orleans’ streets drew national attention this spring after a giant sinkhole opened up downtown during JazzFest. Since then, several more holes have made it into local news - in Uptown and Mid city.

New Orleanians are used to complaining about persistent potholes in all parts of the city - but, sinkholes are a different animal.

Harry Shearer

This week on Le Show with Harry Shearer: Bill O'Reilly's White House Slave Diet, Clintonsomething, Superbugs, News of the Olympic Movement, Read the Trades, News from Outside the Bubble, News of the Atom, The Apologies of the Week, and more!

This week,  Continuum features The Early Music Ensemble Gilles Binchois, now in its thirtieth year of performing medieval church music. The musicians are named after one of the most important composers of the 15th century Burgundian School. Your'll hear them perform Guillaume de Machaut’s 14th century Mass of Notre Dame, the first medieval polyphonic setting of a mass by a known single composer. The setting of this mass is thought to have been composed specifically for the Cathedral of Rheims.

Jesse Hardman

WWNOs community engagement project the Listening Post is back with a new episode.

While the service industry looms large for locals looking to make some money, those jobs don’t necessary help people make ends meet, or take care of their families.

With some new industries flexing their muscles in town, some new career options are starting to take hold, but will that mean jobs and leverage for young adults in the city?

 

We asked folks around town the following questions.

Vessel is a new restaurant in an old New Orleans church.
Ian McNulty

It seems like any building with enough room for a kitchen hood and a few tables is liable to be drafted into the growing ranks of eateries in New Orleans these days, nevermind its original purpose or design. In Mid-City, however, one of the dining scene’s newest additions has taken up residence in what has long been a distinguished New Orleans hybrid.

Vessel opened recently in the old church on Iberville Street that for nearly 30 years was home to Christian's Restaurant, and which later had a stint as the restaurant Redemption.

Out to Lunch, with Peter Ricchiuti.
Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

The term "Renaissance Man" - not surprisingly - comes from the renaissance. A period of history where the possibilities for self-expression flourished. Today the term has come to refer to a person who is not only capable of doing a number of tasks, but who’s able to excel at all of them.

Peter Ricchiuti's guests on Out to Lunch today are New Orleans business renaissance men, and women.

NOLA Project
Jeremy Blum

As we submerge ourselves into the depths of deep summer, New Orleanians must adapt in certain ways to stay copacetic. For Andrew Larimer, a founding member of the NOLA Project Theatre Company, that means staging his play, Exterior. Pool - Night in -- you guessed it -- a swimming pool.

Tripod New Orleans @300 revisits the UpStairs Lounge Fire in the wake of last month’s Orlando Pulse Night Club shooting.

In 1973, Clayton Delery-Edwards was living just outside New Orleans in Metairie, going to high school and- as he puts it - wrestling with "the G question."

“You know by that point I figured out what it was, and I still wasn't sure how it was done, but I knew what it was.”

Clayton’s talking about being gay.

This week on Inside the Arts, FestiGals, the summer weekend getaway for women kicks off Downtown. We talk with spokeswoman Sandra Dartus.

Then, a heads up for design aficionados. We explore minimalism in the New Orleans Museum of Art's new exhibit, The Essence of Things - Design and the Art of Reduction: An Exhibition of the Vitra Design Museum.

And, we round out with the adventures of Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn as Summer Lyric Theater at Tulane closes its season with the Tony Award winning musical Big River.

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