Orleans Parish is seeing its flood maps updated for the first time since 1984 today. More than half of the city is moving out of the so-called “high risk” zone—this comes with lower flood insurance rates, which many are celebrating. But in June, Tulane historian Andy Horowitz penned a controversial op-ed in the New York Times. He called these maps an “outline for disaster.” WWNO’s Ryan Kailath sat down with Horowitz this week to discuss.



Bright red streetcars will start running Sunday on the new route on North Rampart Street. The $40 million project took almost two years to complete. Advocates for transit riders see it as an improvement to a system that still needs work.

Chris Smither
American Routes

Each week, American Routes Shortcuts offers a sneak peak into the upcoming American Routes episode. This week, New Orleans Bluesman Chris Smither plays a live show in his current home- Western Massachusetts.

One night recently at Commander's Palace the two reigning queens of New Orleans cuisine shared a table and, for a moment, the spotlight. It got me thinking about the long game, one so long we can't even see it amid the hubbub of what's new, who's ranked where, and which spot is getting all the attention. It got me thinking about the future, and who’s next.

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This week on All Things New Orleans, City Council is expected to make its first vote on regulating short-term rentals, we’ll hear from both sides. We’ll take a look at how crowdfunding has changed the nature of disaster relief in light of the floods in south Louisiana.

Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

When you live in a place for a while you get used to things. So much so that you hardly notice them anymore, no matter how outlandish they might be.

For example, you can wander around New Orleans' French Quarter with the sound of the calliope blasting over the whole city and not think anything of it. If you do ever stop to think about that calliope music, one of the things you might wonder is, “Who is playing that?”

The Whole Goal in Half the Time!

Sep 29, 2016

When Does Our Fall Membership Drive Start? It Has! And so far we've reached almost 30% of the goal. We need your gift NOW to make sure we only need to go on the air for half the time beginning on October 20th.

Our mission has been more relevant than ever during these last few months, and you can help ensure that we continue bringing essential news coverage — local, national and global — to you, your neighbors, and the whole region.

Katie Hunter-Lowrey

Since 2011, NOLA to Angola has been uniting people in a 170-mile solidarity bike ride from Municipal Court in the shadow of Orleans Parish Prison to Angola Prison, and that solidarity extends way beyond the miles trekked on the ride. The ride focuses on bringing people together, no matter what barriers separate them. NolaVie's Kelley Crawford speaks with Katie Hunter-Lowrey, one of the ride's organizers.

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Kelley Crawford.

Paul Morigi

This is the first edition of TriPod Xtras- exclusive interviews with guests on topics of New Orleans history. Here, Laine Kaplan-Levenson speaks with journalist and author Cokie Roberts. A native New Orleanian, Roberts talks about her connection to the city, and its politics, starting with her Congressional parents. 

Fewer standardized tests and more arts and foreign language. Those are just some of the changes in a draft education plan the state released this week.

Like many states, Louisiana is changing education priorities because now it can. Last year President Obama signed a new education bill into law, replacing No Child Left Behind with the Every Student Succeeds Act. The new law still requires schools to demonstrate how well - or poorly - they're doing. But now states decide how to evaluate and improve schools, rather than the federal government.