News

Founder of the McKenna Museum
Kim Coleman

This week on All Things New Orleans we explore The George and Leah McKenna Museum of African-American Art. The McKenna Museum is committed to the preservation of distinct culture found within the African American community and dedicated to the accessibility of fine art through innovative programs and exhibits.

James Michalopoulos

This week on Inside the Arts, conversation with painter James Michalopoulos.  A new exhibit at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, Waltzing the Muse, celebrates his career with a 30-year retrospective. 

Then, the Musical Arts Society of New Orleans presents Great Scott! Joplin in the Quarter, featuring pianist Richard Dowling performing a selection of Joplin's best known masterpieces in commemoration of the 100th Anniversary of the Ragtime King's death.

This week on The Reading Life:  Jami Attenberg, whose wonderful new novel is All Grown Up. We’ll also hear from novelist Colson Whitehead, author of the National Book Award winner, The Underground Railroad.

This week on All Things New Orleans, we spoke with representatives of the Global Livingston Institute about their annual iKnow Concert Series in Uganda. Dr. Andrew Ward and Tom Larson, Chairman and Musical Director, both urge New Orleans artists to apply to perform in the 4th annual iKnow Concert Series happening in September 2017. For more information and to apply, visit http://www.iknowconcertseries.org/

Harry Shearer
Harry Shearer / Harry Shearer

This week on Le Show with Harry Shearer: The Appresidentice, Our Freedom-Loving Friends, News of Bad Banks, Read the Trades, News of the Olympic Movement, The Apologies of the Week, News of the Atom, News of the Warm, and more!

The earliest music was composed for the human voice or ensembles of voices. It was not until medieval times that instruments were used to accompany the voices and then as solo instruments without voices. This Continuum presents music devoted to the rise of instrumental music with examples of a variety of the early instruments. The recording use is: Early Music (Various performers) - Vol. 10 of Century Harmonia HMX 2918163-72.

Chef John Besh holding a freshly caught redfish
Randy Schmidt

On this week’s show, we’re looking at the role fishing plays in the lives of some of the greatest chefs in the South.

 

We begin with Susan Schadt, author of Reel Masters. Susan went fishing and caught portraits of eight renowned chefs who treasure the sport.

 

Next, we send you a postcard from Susan’s book launch event, where chefs and guests gathered together to enjoy incredible seafood dishes. We speak to several of the chefs at the book launch, including John Besh, John Currence, and Kelly English.

Rhiannon Giddens
American Routes

Each week, American Routes brings you Shortcuts, a sneak peek at our upcoming show. The Carolina Chocolate Drop began as a seminal African American group that revived the old time string band tradition of the Piedmont where black performers were formative from the 19th century onward. The Chocolate Drops started out as the Sankofa Strings, after meeting at the black banjo gathering in Boone, North Carolina, 2005. They evolved over the next decade. Rhiannon Giddens, trained formally in opera, played banjo and fiddle and sang with her band mates to growing audiences.

Chris Thile

Mar 2, 2017
“Great Music is More Alike Than Un-Alike”
Music Inside Out

For the first ever live recording of Music Inside Out, Gwen caught up with the prodigious and prolific Chris Thile at the George and Joyce Wein Jazz and Heritage Center. He’s barely 36 years-old, but already boasts a lifetime’s worth of achievements. He started learning mandolin as a kindergartener. Three years later, he co-founded the platinum-selling Nickel Creek with his friends Sara and Sean Watkins. The band would become a groundbreaking force in acoustic music.

Louisiana soft shell crabs are a prized find at local markets.
Ian McNulty

People in Louisiana are accustomed to finding delicious local crab everywhere – from fine dining restaurants to neighborhood joints to family affair seafood boils. But right now, Louisiana is finding its crab somewhere unexpected – and that’s off limits.

The state is in the midst of a first-of-its-kind closure of its blue crab fishery. It started just before Mardi Gras and continues through late March.

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