News

This week on The Reading Life: Roberta Brandes Gratz, whose new book is We're Still Here, Ya Bastards; How the People of New Orleans Rebuilt Their City. Also, Amy King, who recently received the Bookwoman Award from the Women's National Book Association.

**Lagniappe Audio**

Cheryl Gerber

Covenant House New Orleans is a safe haven for homeless and at-risk youth. 

“Other people been having control of my life all my life. I was a victim of human trafficking and I’m 22 years old,” a young woman at Covenant House tells me.

Using her name might put her safety in jeopardy. Sexually molested and abused as a child, she took to the streets to get away when she was 17 years old.

A federal judge in New Orleans has ordered the release of an inmate held in solitary confinement for more than 40 years. He’s the last prisoner in a case known as the Angola Three.

StoryCorps

Inside soundproof booths across the country, friends and loved ones are interviewing each other about their lives. The booths belong to StoryCorps, a project that collects the stories of everyday people in order to create an oral history of America.

Bring New Orleans Back Commission / Urban Land Institute

The first comprehensive map for rebuilding New Orleans came out in early 2006, about six months after the flood. Saying it was highly anticipated would be an understatement. On it, some symbols that appeared as a death knell for some neighborhoods: green dots.

Louisiana GOHSEP / Wikimedia Commons

Monday, June 8, 2015  marks the deadline to file a claim under the Deepwater Horizon Economic and Property Damages Settlement Program. The four Louisiana claims centers located in Cutoff, Lake Charles, Lafitte and Metairie will be open until midnight tonight.

Herman, Herman & Katz's Steve Herman, co-lead council for the BP trial's plaintiff's steering committee, explained what the deadline means, starting with the difference between this program and the seafood compensation program, for which the deadline to file claims has already passed.

At first, there wasn’t a name for the kind of music that Fats Domino played.

He called it rhythm and blues. But Domino’s songs stretched beyond that category.

In the late 1940s, Domino was working at a mattress factory in New Orleans and playing piano at night. He’d just gotten married… and both his waistline and fan base were expanding. That’s when the bandleader Billy Diamond first called him “Fats” — and predicted he’d have an outsized career.

This week on Le Show: an new episode of Father Knows Best, News of Bad Banks, Let Us Try, News of the Olympic Movement, Follow the Dollar, News from Outside the Bubble, The Revolving Door Waltz, News of the Atom, The Apologies of the Week, and more!

This week, Continuum will feature The Queen’s Delight, a special music program devoted to the 17th century English ballads and dances of the time of Elizabeth I.

You’ll hear music by John Dowland, William Byrd, Thomas Robinson and, of course, the inimitable Anonymous, performed by members of The King’s Noyse early music ensemble.

CD recordings used will be The Queen's Delight (The King's Noyse) - harmonia mundi 907180; and, Songs & Dances from Shakespeare (The Broadside Band) - Saydisc CD-SDL 400

Chris Kehoe

Have you ever noticed how many family business center around food? That’s especially true of the restaurant business! On this week’s Louisiana Eats!, we hear from several multigenerational restaurateurs of note.

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