News

Mallory Falk / WWNO

New Orleans might soon become the first city without a single traditional public school. The superintendent and school board decide later this month whether to charter the last five schools, which means they’d be publicly funded but privately run. That has at least one family concerned.

Louisiana homeowners with damage from last year's devastating floods are being asked to take a survey.

Harry Shearer
Harry Shearer / Harry Shearer

This week on Le Show, Harry Shearer plays the "Dead Cat Bounce" and a new The Appresidentice.  Also: News of Inspectors General, News of the Atom, News of the Warm, News of the Olympic Movement, The Apologies of the Week, and more!

Continuum presents music performed by the medieval music Ensemble Altramar, founded in 1991 in Bloomington, Indiana. The ensemble specializes in music of the medieval Era, sharing historical repertory. Altramar, in the Occitan language of the troubadours, was the name given to the Near Eastern lands that lay “over the sea;” the lands where Crusade and trade resulted in the rich cultural interchange of East and West. Recordings by Altramar used are: Nova Stella  - Dorian DIS-80142, Saint Francis and the Minstrels of God - Dorian DIS-80143, and Crossroads of the Celts - Dorian DOR-93177.

On this week’s show, we’re looking at the role economics plays in running a flourishing food and beverage operation.

 

We begin with hospitality tech entrepreneur Damian Mogavero, who explains the importance of raw data in managing a restaurant. Damian has been able to use his dual passions for dining and data to create a system for “new garde restaurateurs,” a story now chronicled in his book, The Underground Culinary Tour.

Patrick Melon / Melon the Scribe

This week on All Things New Orleans we sort through estimates of the city's shift in population with Dr. Allison Plyer, Executive Director of the Data Center. Then, WWNO's Jessica Rosgaard shares a conversation about the formation of Bayou Metairie with Cityscapes columnist, Richard Campanella. 

The legendary Aaron Neville is back in New Orleans for his French Quarter Festival debut; we'll share a quick chat with him about festival season and his latest album, "Apache". 

Alynda Segarra
American Routes

Alynda Segarra grew up in a Puerto Rican family in the Bronx. As a teenager, she hit the road, hopping trains, living a traveler’s life. She wound up in New Orleans in 2007 and felt more at home here than anywhere else. Segarra played acoustic on street corners, and started the band Hurray for the Riff Raff.

The bakery counter at Breads on Oak, a modern New Orleans bakery on Oak Street.
Ian McNulty

From the most basic ingredients, bakers create wonders. It’s that pastry that makes up for getting up early, the cakes that become centerpieces of our celebrations, the anytime indulgences that get us through the day and, it’s even the unadorned loaves that are so tempting we have to tear off a piece before the bread ever makes it home. It all starts with age-old essentials, and the transformative potential of skill and craft.

In New Orleans these days, though, bakers are transforming more than just their ingredients.

Producer Eve Abrams and students at Riverdale High School in Jefferson, La.
Jason Saul

WWNO New Orleans Public Radio is proud to announce the selection of Unprisoned: Stories from the System as a finalist in the 76th annual George Foster Peabody Awards.

New Film Spotlights First Black NBA Player

Apr 6, 2017
Creative Control

When the NBA came to New Orleans for All-Star Weekend earlier this year, it brought more than just players to the court. It also hosted the world premiere of a documentary called The First To Do It: The Life and Times of Earl Lloyd from filmmaking team Coodie & Chike. NolaVie's Brian Friedman spoke with Coodie Simmons and Chike Ozah to hear more about their latest film.

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Brian Friedman.

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