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This Continuum presents a program featuring the female vocal ensemble known as “Tapestry”. The Boston-based vocal and instrumental group was founded by member Laurie Monahan in the 1980s and combines a repertoire of music from the medieval to the contemporary periods. This program features the recordings “Sapphire Night”, “The Fourth River’, and “Song of Songs Come into my Garden”. The so-named Tapestry recordings used are: Musikproduction MDG 344 1193-2, Telarc CD-80534, and Telarc CD.

Tyler Antrup with the city’s Office of Resilience, Loyola law professor Rob Verchick, architect David Waggonner and assistant inspector general Nadiene Van Dyke. It was moderated by history professor Eric Hardy.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The New Orleans Sewerage and Water Board has been under fire since the city’s pumping system failed and caused major flooding in August.  

Travis Lux / WWNO

Floods this summer revealed that New Orleans’ drainage system hasn’t been working at full capacity. Since then, the city has been scrambling to improve the system in a number of ways — from repairing drainage pumps to clearing catch basins on the street.

 

This weekend, the city will teach citizens how to clean catch basins themselves. They’re calling it Adopt-A-Catch Basin.

 

Catch basins are those grated gutters on the sides of the road. When it rains, water flows through those grates before it’s pumped out of the city.

American Routes Shortcuts: Charles Neville

Sep 29, 2017
Charles Neville with the Jazzmen at Angola Prison
Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities

This week on American Routes Shortcuts, saxophonist Charles Neville shares about his time at Angola Prison in the '60s. He was among many great musicians who were sent to the penitentiary for drug offenses. One of his great contributions as an inmate was helping to racially and musically integrate prison life. Charles helped form the unlikely but prolific bebop group, the Nic Nacs, and found solace in the music he encountered while at Angola.

Over the years at MIO, we’ve heard from an enormous variety of artists… Vocalists, pianists, guitarists and brass; composers, songwriters and producers; jazzmen, opera singers and artists that defy category. But no matter the background, style or vocation, all of our artists have a lot of stories to tell… so many, in fact, that we can’t always fit them in a single hour!

This week on Music Inside Out, we’re bringing you those all those clips that were just too good to leave on the cutting room floor!

Molly Peterson / WWNO

Around the country, hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent to buy back individual homes from people who have flooded repeatedly. But buying out a whole neighborhood is uncommon. Louisiana's 2016 flood seems to be changing that for two communities. In Pointe Coupee and Ascension Parishes, a buyout program first used in neighborhoods after Superstorm Sandy may offer a new option to homeowners who have lived with escalating risk for decades.

On this week's edition of All Things New Orleans, we'll share the latest episode of the Listening Post, which focuses on New Orleanians who are in recovery from a gunshot wound.  

Then we'll discuss the upcoming Ponderosa Stomp Festival, an event that celebrates the music and lives of American music's unsung heroes. And, we'll share another story from Bring Your Own; a live storytelling series. 

The patio at Treo on Tulane Avenue in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

In deepest summer, there is a certain mindset in New Orleans that regards the outdoors as enemy territory. Maybe you’ve succumbed to it once or twice yourself.

When this mindset sinks in, the outdoors is something to be monitored and cordoned. You dash from door to door at your own risk, and air conditioning on an outing for dinner or drinks is as necessary as air tanks for a deep sea dive. When true fall arrives, of course, all is forgiven and an outdoor perch is the place to be.

Candidates Desiree Charbonnet, Latoya Cantrell and Michael Bagneris talked education fixes at WYES studios.
Jess Clark / WWNO

New Orleans mayoral candidates took part in two debates Wednesday night, each candidate attempting to stand out, but often overlapping with one another on answers to the city's education, crime and infrastructure problems.

St. Augustine Church

Despite the lingering summer weather, fall festival season has arrived. And this weekend kicks off with the Treme Fall Festival. Music and art will fill the streets of the Treme for this fundraiser to benefit the restoration of the neighborhood's historic St. Augustine Church. NolaVie's David Benedetto speaks with some of the organizers and sends us this preview.

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