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Poppy's welcoming marquee on the Hotel Cazan in Mamou, Louisiana
Reggie Morris / Louisiana Eats

Louisiana Eats is on the road again, this time to Evangeline Parish, where residents show pride for their French, Cajun, and Creole heritage through their food, music, and traditions. On this week's show, we participate in the annual Le Grand Hoorah celebration, while hitting many iconic spots along the Cajun Prairie.

American Routes Shortcuts: Gershwin's "Summertime"

Aug 4, 2017
George Gershwin
American Routes

Each week, American Routes brings you Shortcuts, a sneak peak at our upcoming show. This week, we bask in the summer heat and listen to our favorite versions of the George Gershwin classic, “Summertime,” from the 1934 opera Porgy and Bess.

More people are dining at the bar, even at high-end restaurants, and that's changing the bartender's job.
Ian McNulty

It sounds simple enough. “Let’s just eat at the bar.” But when someone walks into a restaurant and utters those words they have summed up a dining trend that is changing the way restaurants operate, influencing how they’re designed and transforming the role of the person on the other side of that bar, the restaurant bartender.

Within Buddhist traditions, “samsara” refers to the karmic cycle of rebirth that a being must travel through on their journey towards enlightenment. While in some traditions this can take many lifetimes to complete, others maintain that, for certain exceptional people, the transformative process can happen within a single lifetime.

New Harmony High School

Some innovative educators in New Orleans are rethinking high school. When New Harmony High opens next year, it won’t look – or act -- like a conventional school. That’s because it will most likely be situated on a barge on the Mississippi River. And its curriculum will include some unique lessons about coastal land loss. NolaVie's Renee Peck sits down with Sunny Dawn Summers, New Harmony's Head of School, to hear about this distinctive project.

LSU/LUMCON

The dead zone is an area in the Gulf of Mexico where the oxygen is so low that fish and shrimp can’t live.

 

Scientists say this year’s dead zone is 8,776 square miles now -- about the size of New Jersey. Over the last five years it’s averaged 5,543 square miles.

 

It’s caused largely by agricultural runoff from the Midwest, and brought downstream by the Mississippi River. That runoff is high in nitrates, from fertilizer, which causes algae to bloom. When the algae dies, it sucks oxygen out of the water.

Courtesy of StoryCorps

As part of our StoryCorps series on criminal justice, we bring you a conversation between social workers.

Noelle Deltufo and Ginger Parsons are close friends who worked together as social workers for the OPD - Orleans Public Defenders. They discuss the emotional labor that comes with social work and more broadly about systemic injustice.


Photo Credit: Sandrine Lee

This week on Inside the Arts, Satchmo SummerFest returns to The Mint for a three-day celebration honoring the birthday of New Orleans’ native son, Louis Armstrong.

Then, a conversation with Catherine Russell.  The Grammy winning singer returns for encore performances during Satchmo SummerFest; and thousands of art lovers are expected to flood the Arts District as the CAC kicks off its Whitney White Linen night festivities. Inside the Arts, Tuesdays at 1 pm, Wednesdays at 8:30 pm and Thursdays at 8:45 am.

This week on The Reading Life: Bill Fagaly, former curator at the New Orleans Museum of Art, talks about about his wonderful essay in "Pride of Place: The Making of Contemporary Art in New Orleans," about the Arthur Roer Gift to the New Orleans Museum of Art. Literacy activist Megan Holt previews the citywide reading initiative, One Book One New Orleans, and this year's selection, "Counting Descent," by poet Clint Smith.

Mayor Mitch Landrieu's administration has released its final city budget. Landrieu touted a surplus, announced plans for a rainy day fund and continued an emphasis on beefing up the police department.

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