News

The Jewish festival of Passover celebrates of the freedom of the Israelites from slavery and exodus from Egypt.
Eczebulun / Wikimedia Commons

Every year, households across Louisiana celebrate the eight-day festival of Passover. On this week's show, we’re bringing in the experts to help us explore Jewish food traditions old and new. 

 

We speak with Joyce Goldstein, author of The New Mediterranean Jewish Table, about sephardic recipes of the Jewish diaspora. In compiling her book, Joyce set out to demystify the diverse traditions of Jewish cooking in the Mediterranean region.

Justice advocates are recommending changes at New Orleans Criminal Court. One suggestion is not locking up victims who refuse to testify. The annual report from CourtWatch NOLA says prosecutors should consider that victims can be afraid of retaliation if they appear in court.

Photo Credit: Elsa Hahne

This week on Inside the Arts, "Orfeo" returns to the Marigny Opera House. The original full length ballet, is inspired by an Italian opera and based on the Greek legend of Orpheus and Eurydice. We talk with choreographer Maya Taylor and producer Dave Hurlbert.

This week on The Reading Life: Mary Louise Mossy Christovich, co-author, with Roulhac Bunkley Toledano, of "Garden Legacy," the latest beautiful book from the Historic New Orleans Collection. We’ll also hear from Tom McDermott, whose new book of limericks is "Five Lines, No Waiting." And Abram Himelstein previews the New Orleans Write-A Thon.

**Langiappe Audio**

Mallory Falk / WWNO

New Orleans might soon become the first city without a single traditional public school. The superintendent and school board decide later this month whether to charter the last five schools, which means they’d be publicly funded but privately run. That has at least one family concerned.

Louisiana homeowners with damage from last year's devastating floods are being asked to take a survey.

Harry Shearer
Harry Shearer / Harry Shearer

This week on Le Show, Harry Shearer plays the "Dead Cat Bounce" and a new The Appresidentice.  Also: News of Inspectors General, News of the Atom, News of the Warm, News of the Olympic Movement, The Apologies of the Week, and more!

Continuum presents music performed by the medieval music Ensemble Altramar, founded in 1991 in Bloomington, Indiana. The ensemble specializes in music of the medieval Era, sharing historical repertory. Altramar, in the Occitan language of the troubadours, was the name given to the Near Eastern lands that lay “over the sea;” the lands where Crusade and trade resulted in the rich cultural interchange of East and West. Recordings by Altramar used are: Nova Stella  - Dorian DIS-80142, Saint Francis and the Minstrels of God - Dorian DIS-80143, and Crossroads of the Celts - Dorian DOR-93177.

On this week’s show, we’re looking at the role economics plays in running a flourishing food and beverage operation.

 

We begin with hospitality tech entrepreneur Damian Mogavero, who explains the importance of raw data in managing a restaurant. Damian has been able to use his dual passions for dining and data to create a system for “new garde restaurateurs,” a story now chronicled in his book, The Underground Culinary Tour.

Patrick Melon / Melon the Scribe

This week on All Things New Orleans we sort through estimates of the city's shift in population with Dr. Allison Plyer, Executive Director of the Data Center. Then, WWNO's Jessica Rosgaard shares a conversation about the formation of Bayou Metairie with Cityscapes columnist, Richard Campanella. 

The legendary Aaron Neville is back in New Orleans for his French Quarter Festival debut; we'll share a quick chat with him about festival season and his latest album, "Apache". 

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