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A smoked brisket sandwich from the butcher shop Cleaver & Co. in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

Back in the day, neighborhoods had their own butcher, their own baker and, well, maybe not their own candlestick maker, but at least other purveyors who were masters of their trades. You get the point.           

Today, butcher shops are making a comeback in New Orleans. But while the old butcher shop techniques are often the same, the way this next generation courts customers has changed. They’re finding new ways to introduce the prospect of a full butcher’s case to a clientele that may have been raised on supermarket staples and processed products.

Out to Lunch, with Peter Ricchiuti.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

For a long time in New Orleans, if you wanted to eat healthy, you could eat at home. Although that sounds like a joke, it was pretty close to the truth. If you were eating out and wanted a salad, you’d be lucky to find anything other than a pedestrian appetizer.

Today, things are looking brighter for the healthy eater.

Taylor Williams
Mark Reynolds

Between overgrown vines, prickly thorns, and bugs of all kinds, the Louisiana environment presents a formidable challenge for any landscaper. No one knows this better than horticulturist Taylor Williams, who comes armed with pruning shears wherever he goes. On the eve of this year’s harvest, Kelley Crawford spoke with Taylor about his experiences in the weeds and wilds of Louisiana’s backyard.

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Kelley Crawford. 

Thousands of Louisiana students are English Language Learners. Many recently came here from Central America, with or without their families. Schools don't always know what they need or are entitled to receive. Now the Southern Poverty Law Center and Louisiana Department of Education are trying to change that.

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

CourtWatch NOLA  has been gathering data on the Orleans Parish criminal justice system. The group found problems that include locking up poor people for failing to pay fines, and widely varying sentences.

Photo Credit: Kane Hibberd

This week on Inside the Arts, the NOLA Project presents the world premiere of local playwright Gabrielle Reisman's  Flood City. It is a work that chronicles the survivors of the 1889 Johnstown Flood.

 Then, a bluesman from the land down under heads to the Crescent City.  We talk with C. W. Stoneking about his new release, Gon' Boogaloo. And, we round out with a daylong conference celebrating Joan of Arc. Airs Tuesdays at 1:00 p.m. and Thursdays at 8:45 a.m. 

This week on The Reading Life:  Bestselling crime novelist Sara Paretsky, author of the V.I. Warshawski series and this year's winner of the Pinckley Prize for Crime Fiction for a Distinguished Body of Work, who's coming for Bouchercon, the great mystery writers and fans convention taking place next weekend.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

As people in cities and towns across Louisiana continue the ongoing cleanup of flood-damaged buildings and homes, farmers face another set of problems. Many corn, soybean, sugar and rice farmers in the southern part of the state had their fields flooded with several feet of water. Now they are trying to figure out what comes next.

Harry Shearer

This week on Le Show: Larry King - The Presidential Forum, We've Got Dominion, News from Outside the Bubble, This Is You Brain On Drugs, The Apologies of the Week, and more!

Continuum presents a recording by the Norwegian female vocal ensemble, Trio Mediaeval. The title Ladymass refers not to the female singers but to the mass’s association with the Assumption of the blessed Virgin. In fact, it is extremely unlikely that women would have performed this music originally. It was written by and for the 13th century Benedictine monks of the Abbey of St. Mary’s, in Worcester, England. Recordings used are: A Worcester Ladymass (Trio Mediaeval ) - ECM New Series 2166, and, O Greenest Branch (New Orleans Musica da Camera) - Belle Alliance BA002.

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