News

Cityscapes: New Orleans Almost Had A Monorail

Feb 4, 2016
Tulane Special Collections

New Orleans has various ways of transportation to get around the city including ferries, streetcars and buses.  However, in 1958 New Orleans planned to create a new form of getting around: a monorail. The idea of creating the monorail came from the city's urge to remain modern and keep up with Houston, which had recently passed New Orleans as the largest city in the region. 

Zoe Hughes / University of New Orleans

A professor at the University of New Orleans has received a grant to study marshes. The research will compare wetlands in Louisiana with those on the east coast.

Peter Ricchiuti.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

Did you know that more people are scared of public speaking than are scared of heights or spiders? And that, when asked, people rank fear of public speaking as even greater than fear of commitment? Think about that. Many of us are more scared of standing up in front of strangers for 5 minutes than committing to a relationship for a lifetime.

Tulane doctors are conducting health screenings today and tomorrow for former NFL players during Super Bowl week festivities. Many players don’t keep up with medical care after leaving the league.

New Orleans in 1958 is the setting for starting an intricate series featuring organized crime, the CIA, Cuba, Kennedy and rock 'n roll.
Crescent City Films LLC

A look at New Orleans through turbulent years starting in the late 1950s is about to debut this weekend at the Prytania Theater. It’s the first glimpse of an intricate project that ends with the assassination of President Kennedy.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Most of the fish we eat in the U.S. comes from other countries. Fishermen in Louisiana have long sought to displace some of those imports but the industry has faced challenges like hurricanes and the 2010 BP oil spill.

Now, a new source of fish in the gulf offers promise -- but also raises questions.

Miette Art Boutique

This week on Inside the Arts, playwright Jim Fitzmorris ponders what it truly means to be a New Orleanian in his latest one man show, Be A New Orleanian: A Swearing In Ceremony.

Then, we talk with the creator of the 1970's Saturday Night Live character Mr. Bill.  New Orleans native Walter Williams debuts a sneak peek at Crescent City, a TV series set in town with a focus on events leading up to JFK's assassination.

And, we round out with a look at Mardi Gras float art available for public collection. 

Waiting for traffic court at the New Orleans Mission.
Cheryl Gerber / Unprisoned

Our ongoing series Unprisoned has been bringing you stories of how mass incarceration affects New Orleans.

Last time, we learned about New Orleans Municipal Court, the largest criminal court in Louisiana. Today, we follow Municipal Court to the New Orleans Mission — where a large number of homeless people who are facing municipal charges are being served directly.

Lally Brennan and Poppy Tooker holding up a 2016 Pete Fountain Bobblehead at Commander's Palace.
Joe Shriner

It's Carnival time on Louisiana Eats! On this week's show, we learn about Carnival traditions both public and private, and celebrations both large and small. We begin with a lively discussion about New Orleans' Mardi Gras traditions with Errol Laborde, author of Mardi Gras: Chronicles of the New Orleans Carnival.

Then, we make our way over to Commander's Palace, where Lally Brennan explains the part her family's restaurant plays in fueling Pete Fountain's Half Fast Walking Club on Mardi Gras morning.

This week on the Reading Life: Arthur Hardy, celebrating 40 years of publishing Arthur Hardy’s Mardi Gras Guide, and Yvonne Perret, author of the children's book,  The Little Float that Could.

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