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Continuum presents a live recording of a recent Musica da Camera concert about Love. The music is of diverse places and times and includes selections by medieval composers Petrus de Cruce, La Comtessa de Dia, Guillaume de Machaut and, of course, the ubiquitous Anonymous. The concert was recorded in St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in New Orleans. The program is from the Musica da Camera's CD, Love Is Where You Find It, Belle Alliance BA007.

Poppy Tooker, chefs from the Dickie Brennan Restaurant Group and Dickie Brennan show off their catch of the day.
Paul Broussard

On this week’s show, we’re traveling from Lafitte bayous to French Quarter kitchens for a look at Louisiana’s Catch and Cook Program. Under Catch and Cook, charter fishing groups can bring their catch to a participating restaurant, where the chef will prepare their fresh-caught fish to order.

We begin by angling on the water with Dickie Brennan, Executive Chef Gus Martin, and Captain Theophile Bourgeouis. Theophile, a lifelong Louisiana fisherman, navigates the waters and leads us to a successful catch. Then, we follow our fish to the kitchen of Tableau, where Dickie Brennan’s team of chefs prepare the evening's dinner.

T-Lou
American Routes

 

Each week, American Routes brings you Shortcuts, a sneak peek at our upcoming show. This week, our program travels to Los Angeles, where host Nick Spitzer spoke with Creole accordionist T-Lou. He moved from his home in Grand Coteau Louisiana, and made a new one South Central LA.

NS:      Hey,

TL:       Hey, how ya’ll doin?

NS:      Alright, T-Lou!

TL:       How you been?

NS:      Ca va?

TL:       Hey Man

NS:      Parle un petit peu en Creole?

TL:       Oui, oui, un petit peu…

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The outlook for the shipping industry under President Donald Trump, so far, has been a bit of a mixed bag. Some policies will be good for business, others might hamper it.

 

Despite that, the CEO of the Port of New Orleans says the future looks good.

 

Since taking office, Trump has pulled out of an international trade agreement and considered tariffs on certain imports. Both of these moves could mean less stuff flows through US ports.

 

The name Creole tomato can turn heads in the market place this time of year.
Ian McNulty

When does summer start? Consult the calendar and you’ll see it’s still a month away. But in New Orleans the seasons aren’t necessarily tied to the conventions of solstice and equinox.

For me, the New Orleans summer always begins immediately after Jazz Fest, and it’s not the changing weather alone that marks the shift.

It’s the feeling that the long New Orleans train of one big celebration after the next has reached the station, and it’s time to hop off for a bit.

Croissants from Dawn 'til Dusk: A Baker's Story

May 18, 2017
The Historic New Orleans Collection

French bakeries have a unique place in the cultural landscape of New Orleans. The Vieux Carré just wouldn't be the same if you couldn't find French sweets there. Maurice Delechelle can take much of the credit for that. Hailing from central France, Maurice brought his traditional French pastries to the Quarter with the opening of La Marquise and Croissant d'Or. From his vantage point at the bakery, the French Quarter shared a distinct resemblance to his memories of bohemian Paris.

The Ryan School of Irish Dance

Near the end of the 1700s, New Orleans became a safe haven for the Irish fleeing English persecution, and since those fateful days, Irish culture has become woven into the city’s own. Started over a decade ago, The Ryan School of Irish Dance continues to build the legacy of Irish dancing in New Orleans, and NolaVie’s Kelley Crawford spoke to students Sarah Taylor and Rachel Martin about what that legacy entails.  

Travis Lux / WWNO

Last August, several days of heavy rain flooded the Baton Rouge area. From Baton Rouge to Denham Springs to Gonzales -- rising waters flooded out around one hundred thousand homes and caused billions of dollars worth of damage. Recovery is ongoing, even nine months later.

 

The Baton Rouge area isn’t the only part of the state still struggling this many months out. The damage rippled out across the state -- all the way down to the tiny town of Leeville, near Grand Isle, along the coast.

 

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

A third confederate monument in New Orleans was removed in the middle of the night. The statue of P.G.T. Beauregard that once stood at the entrance to New Orleans’ City Park is now gone.

It took almost 7 hours for workers to strap the statue of confederate general PGT Beauregard and his horse to a crane and lift it onto a flatbed truck. Karen Murray was there in protest. She wiped away angry tears as she watched workers set up in the dark.

A coalition of community groups is leading a petition drive to recall New Orleans District Attorney Leon Cannizzaro.

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