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Dancing in the Middle ages was one of the most popular pastimes. There are some medieval and Renaissance dances that have come down to us. Unfortunately quite a few of the popular dances were not written down because it was assumed that everybody knew them. On this Continuum you’ll hear some of the 45 or so dances that we do have available from early written sources. Recordings used are: A Dance in the Garden of Mirth (The Dufay Collective) - Chandos CHAN 9320, and Istanpitta II (New York’s Ensemble for Early Music) - Lyrichord LEMS 8022.

At Friday's meeting of the Restore Louisiana Task Force, the members approved a formal request for an additional $2 billion in recovery funds as part of a federal budget proposal being considered by Congress next week.

Each week, American Routes brings you Shortcuts, a sneak peek at our upcoming show. This week, it’s our show, “How many Roads?" Bob Dylan’s Back Pages. Joan Baez sang and recorded many of Bob’s songs of love and loss. She spoke to host Nick Spitzer about her favorite love ballads, Dylan's lyrical writing, and being the subject of songs herself.

NS: I wonder, is there a single love song over the years that most endures for you?

JB: A single love song?

A fried shrimp po-boy from Avery's on Tulane.
Ian McNulty

We talk about it with our best friends and with perfect strangers. We rant about it online and we dream about it at night. It's a natural fixation when we’re hungry, yet we still talk about it when our mouths are full.

    It's the food of New Orleans, compelling, often uniting, frequently divisive and never boring, at least not if you’re doing it right. May it always be at the ends of our forks and on the tips of our tongues.

Chuck Perrodin / CPRA

Governor John Bel Edwards has declared Louisiana’s ongoing coastal land loss a state of emergency. It’s part of the state’s strategy to speed up coastal restoration projects.

Environmental permits can slow down big restoration projects. The Army Corps of Engineers, for example, says it could take up to five years to get federal permits to open up the Mississippi River and use diversions to create new land.

So state officials are looking for ways to fast-track these projects.  

Birth of the Bunch: The Life and Times of Benny Grunch

Apr 20, 2017
Benny Grunch & The Bunch

Musicians and artists often describe how their influences find them. In Benny Grunch’s case, his divine inspiration came from a handheld radio, and took the form of humor, deft storytelling, and a love for his hometown. Benny “Grunch” Antin is the founding member of Benny Grunch & The Bunch, a group that for decades has performed songs of satirical nostalgia for New Orleans. In this edition of NOLA Life Stories, Benny takes us on a highly musical memoir, from childhood to the origins of his band.   

More than 1,400 local, state and federal officials from around the country are in New Orleans this week to focus on hurricane response. Mayor Mitch Landrieu told the group that good communication is vital. Mayor Landrieu said there have been dramatic improvements in disaster response since the days after Hurricane Katrina. “I’m a FEMA fan now. FEMA’s gotten a lot better,” he said. He said people working on hurricane preparedness, response and rebuilding often coordinate with other agencies.

Bastion

Going to war takes courage. Sometimes, coming home takes the same. U.S. combat veterans who have survived life-threatening injuries can find the transition from hot zone to home life a difficult one. In New Orleans, an organization called Bastion is lending a hand. NolaVie’s Renée Peck spoke to founder Dylan Tête about the community he is building in Gentilly for wounded veterans and their families.

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Renée Peck.

Pat Denton Collection / Newcomb Archives, Tulane University

This is the first in a two-part series on the local Second-wave feminist movement and the battle over the Equal Rights Amendment. Listen to Part II here. 

It’s July 3rd, 1982. Feminists are marching through downtown New Orleans in support of the Equal Rights Amendment, the ERA.

This week on Inside the Arts, conversation with violin virtuoso Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg. She performs in concert this week with the Loyola Chamber Orchestra.

 

Then, a new exhibit at the New Orleans Museum of Art  complements traditional Japanese art with the contemporary work of New Orleans painter Regina Scully.  WWNO's Eileen Fleming talks with NOMA's Lisa Rotondo-McCord and the artist herself about the unexpected connection of styles.

 

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