News

Dew Drop Inn
Courtesy of the Ralston Crawford Collection of Jazz Photography, Hogan Jazz Archive, Tulane Universtiy

On Lasalle St, just across from the former CJ Peete housing project, you can see the dilapidated sign of a New Orleans landmark: the Dew Drop Inn. From the 40s to 70s, in a time of segregation, the Dew Drop played the role of rooming house, barber shop, post office restaurant and above all the top night club in the African American community.

Music Inside Out

Danny Barker (1909-1994) was born into that generation of musicians whose lives reflected the arc of jazz from men blowing horns atop mule-drawn wagons to the world stage. From New Orleans to New York and back again, he managed to be both a witness and participant in the evolution of the music.

A sign points the way to Second Line Brewery in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

It's not hard to find a drink in New Orleans. But getting a beer direct from the source at one of the local breweries now proliferating around our city often means venturing to back streets, dead ends and once-forgotten corners of town.

Beer making is essentially light industrial work. It calls for an industrial setting. Beer drinking is often a social pursuit. And so, the taprooms where these new small brewers now sell pints of their product direct have created a different sort of social space -- luring beer lovers to niches of New Orleans neighborhoods that had not seen much life until lately.

Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

When you’re starting your own business you often hear two pieces of advice. "Do something you love." And, "use your personal experience to better understand your business."

They're talking about the self generating loop of feeling good and looking good on this edition of Out to Lunch.

Derek Bridges / Flickr

When I woke up and checked the news, I could hardly believe what I was hearing. I stared at my screen in disbelief. This was really happening. This was the new reality. And there was nothing that I could do about it. I had to muster every ounce of inner strength I had just to say the words, to make them real, to accept that this was the truth.

“The New Orleans Zephyrs are now...the New Orleans Baby Cakes.”

Photograph of Mother Catherine and her congregation at the Temple of the Innocent Blood, ca. 1929.
Historic New Orleans Collection, made possible by the Clarisse Claiborne Grima Fund.

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a portrait of Mother Catherine Seals, one of the city’s most prominent 20th century spiritual church leaders.

Mother Catherine Seals is a mysterious figure. There’s not much written about her, and there are only a few photographs of her. So a lot of what we do know about this spiritual mother is hearsay.

Eve Troeh/WWNO

It's been over 100 days since floodwaters rose up to the rooftops in parts of Baton Rouge, La. The so-called 1,000-year flood hit neighborhoods that had never seen such a disaster. But to some flood victims, it was all too familiar - those who moved to Baton Rouge from New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina about a decade ago.

This week on Inside the Arts, jazz vocalist Zardis Nichols makes her hometown concert debut in Zardis: Outta My Mind at the Peoples Health New Orleans Jazz Market.  Nichols is the grand-niece of legendary New Orleans bassist Chester Zardis and is married to acclaimed actor Lance Nichols. 

This week on The Reading Life: John Kemp, author of the gorgeous book, "Expressions of Place: The Contemporary Louisiana Landscape," and poet Andrea Panzeca, whose new collection is "Rusted Bells and Daisy Baskets."

Jessica Rosgaard / WWNO

As this holiday season begins, Louisiana waits on federal disaster relief funding; no word yet on the Governor's request to Congress for an additional four billion dollars. While some flood victims spent Thanksgiving in newly fixed houses, thousands more are still not home. Jessica Rosgaard went to a free holiday meal for flood victims in Baton Rouge.

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