News

Flood Recovery: Not-So-Rapid Rehousing

Aug 15, 2017
Molly Peterson

Federal aid helped pay for hotels for thousands of Louisianans after last year's flood. Until May, the short-term program help people find shelter, especially low-income renters. Now a state-managed program is still filling in the gaps, trying to give more permanent homes to families washed out last year — including a single mother in Baton Rouge.

Wallis Watkins

Denham Springs saw some of the worst damage in the August 2016 flood. As the rebuilding continues, the city is developing a long-term recovery plan — one designed by the people who live there. Denham Strong, the city's recovery planning group, gives residents an opportunity to advocate for what they want Denham Springs to look like years from now.

Harry Shearer
Harry Shearer / Harry Shearer

This week on Le Show: Jersey Working Man, News of Inspectors General, Our Freedom-Loving Friends, News of the Warm, The Apologies of the Week, News of the Atom, and more!

French composer, Jean-Philippe Rameau (1683-1764) was one of the most important composers and music theorists of the Baroque era. He was a dominant composer of French opera and is also considered the leading French composer for the harpsichord. This Continuum presents music composed for his funeral by another recognized French composer of the same period, Jean Gilles (1668-1705). Recording used: Rameau’s Funeral (Capriccio Stravagante et al directed by New Orleans born Skip Sempe) - Paradizo PA0013.

Some designs never go out of style and mid-century modern furniture, architecture, prints and homewares still put the “fun” in functional. The idea behind such 20th century thinking was to make the world look more like the future than the past — less George Washington and more George Jetson.

Host Poppy Tooker with NPR's Kitchen Sisters Davia Nelson, left, and Nikki Silva, right.
Joe Shriner / Louisiana Eats

To tell a truly engaging story, you have to dig deep beneath the surface. When it comes to radio storytelling, Davia Nelson and Nikki Silva, also known as the Kitchen Sisters, are masters. Through projects like Lost and Found Sound and Hidden World of Girls, the independent producers tell stories for NPR and online "from the flip side of history."

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, we're talking about the recent floods.

Heavy rains flooded portions of New Orleans last weekend. In the days since, we've learned that there are mechanical problems with the city’s drainage equipment — not only with the pumps, but also with the generators that power them.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The Sewerage and Water Board generator that caught fire this week is back up and running.

 

There are five generators that power the city’s pumping system on the East Bank — all areas west of the Industrial Canal. Only two were working prior to Saturday’s floods.

 

Wednesday night, one of them caught fire and was rendered inoperable for more than 24 hours. That left the city even more vulnerable to flooding, and prompted two days of school closures. On Thursday both Governor John Bel Edwards and Mayor Mitch Landrieu signed emergency declarations as precautionary measures.

American Routes Shortcuts: Jimmy Duck Holmes

Aug 11, 2017
Jimmy "Duck" Holmes
American Routes

Each week, American Routes brings you Shortcuts, a sneak peek at our upcoming show. This week, we speak with bluesman Jimmy “Duck” Holmes about his time running a juke joint in Bentonia, Mississippi called the Blue Front Café. It was at the Blue Front where he learned the Bentonia style of blues guitar from the revered Jack Owens.

The NOPSI Hotel opened in downtown New Orleans in the long-dormant former home of New Orleans Public Service Inc.
Ian McNulty

All through the spring, as the renovations of the new NOPSI Hotel neared completion, I saw how New Orleans people were watching.

They stopped to cast long looks from across Baronne Street and, once the construction barricades were gone, they stepped right up, cupping hands to the glass to peer inside. They were getting a glimpse of what was to come, and also sizing up something historic but long hidden in the middle of downtown New Orleans.

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