fracking http://wwno.org en Rising Shale Water Complicates Fracking Debate http://wwno.org/post/rising-shale-water-complicates-fracking-debate The nation's boom in natural gas production has come with a cost: The technique used to get much of the gas out of the ground, called hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, has contaminated drinking water. But how often and where this contamination is taking place is a matter of much debate and litigation.<p>Now, a new study has found natural pathways of contamination — but that doesn't mean the drilling industry is off the hook.<p>When gas drillers frack, they pump millions of gallons of water, mixed with sand and chemicals, down into a layer of rock called the Marcellus Shale of Pennsylvania. Mon, 09 Jul 2012 21:46:00 +0000 Christopher Joyce 15391 at http://wwno.org Pennsylvania Doctors Worry Over Fracking 'Gag Rule' http://wwno.org/post/pennsylvania-doctors-worry-over-fracking-gag-rule <a href="http://www.whyy.org/"><em>From WHYY</em></a><p>A new law in Pennsylvania has doctors nervous.<p>The law grants physicians access to information about trade-secret chemicals used in natural gas drilling. Doctors say they need to know what's in those formulas in order to treat patients who may have been exposed to the chemicals.<p>But the new law also says that doctors can't tell anyone else — not even other doctors — what's in those formulas. Thu, 17 May 2012 22:01:00 +0000 editor 11395 at http://wwno.org Fracking's Methane Trail: A Detective Story http://wwno.org/post/frackings-methane-trail-detective-story Gaby Petron didn't set out to challenge industry and government assumptions about how much pollution comes from natural gas drilling.<p>She was just doing what she always does as an air pollution data sleuth for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.<p>"I look for a story in the data," says Petron. "You give me a data set, I will study it back and forth and left and right for weeks, and I will find something to tell about it."<p>Petron saw high levels of methane in readings from a NOAA observation tower north of Denver. Thu, 17 May 2012 07:24:00 +0000 Elizabeth Shogren 11291 at http://wwno.org Interactive Map: Conventional Natural Gas Drilling Areas And Shale Basins http://wwno.org/post/interactive-map-conventional-natural-gas-drilling-areas-and-shale-basins <p><span style="color: rgb(102, 102, 102); font-family: arial, sans-serif; line-height: normal; ">For many years, natural gas companies have been producing the fuel from &quot;conventional&quot; gas reservoirs, relatively close to the surface and easily accessible. New shale gas&nbsp;</span><span style="color: rgb(102, 102, 102); font-family: arial, sans-serif; line-height: normal; ">production techniques have opened much wider areas for exploration, including the Marcellus area in Pennsylvania and Haynesville area in Texas and Louisiana.</span></p><p>&nbsp;</p> Thu, 17 May 2012 05:53:47 +0000 Tom Gjelten, Alyson Hurt, Andrew Prince and Avie Schneider | NPR 11284 at http://wwno.org Slideshow: Town's Effort To Link Fracking And Illness Falls Short http://wwno.org/post/slideshow-towns-effort-link-fracking-and-illness-falls-short <embed allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" bgcolor="#FFFFFF" flashvars="thexml=http://media.npr.org/assets/multimedia/2012/04/tx_dish/&amp;theswf=http://media.npr.org/design/flash_templates/nprgallery_embed.swf?path=http://media.npr.org/assets/multimedia/2012/04/tx_dish/" height="463" id="soundslider" name="soundslider" quality="high" src="http://www.npr.org/design/flash_templates/preloaderAS3.swf" style="undefined" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="578" wmode="transparent"></embed> Wed, 16 May 2012 18:42:33 +0000 David Gilkey | NPR 11283 at http://wwno.org Town's Effort To Link Fracking And Illness Falls Short http://wwno.org/post/towns-effort-link-fracking-and-illness-falls-short Quite a few of the 225 people who live in Dish, Texas, think the nation's natural gas boom is making them sick.<p>They blame the chemicals used in gas production for health problems ranging from nosebleeds to cancer.<p>And the mayor of Dish, Bill Sciscoe, has a message for people who live in places where gas drilling is about to start: "Run. Run as fast as you can. Grab up your family and your belongings, and get out."<p>But scientists say it's just not clear whether pollutants from gas wells are hurting people in Dish or anywhere else. Wed, 16 May 2012 18:41:00 +0000 Jon Hamilton 11242 at http://wwno.org Medical Records Could Yield Answers On Fracking http://wwno.org/post/medical-records-could-yield-answers-fracking A proposed study of people in northern Pennsylvania could help resolve a national debate about whether the natural gas boom is making people sick.<p>The study would look at detailed health histories on hundreds of thousands of people who live near the Marcellus Shale, a rock formation in which energy companies have already drilled about 5,000 natural gas wells.<p>If the study goes forward, it would be the first large-scale, scientifically rigorous assessment of the health effects of gas production.<p><strong><strong>Secret Weapon: A Very Large Database Wed, 16 May 2012 07:04:00 +0000 Jon Hamilton 11170 at http://wwno.org Slideshow: 'Close Encounters' With Gas Well Pollution http://wwno.org/post/slideshow-close-encounters-gas-well-pollution <embed allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" bgcolor="#FFFFFF" flashvars="thexml=http://media.npr.org/assets/multimedia/2012/04/co_frack/&amp;theswf=http://media.npr.org/design/flash_templates/nprgallery_embed.swf?path=http://media.npr.org/assets/multimedia/2012/04/co_frack/" height="463" id="soundslider" name="soundslider" quality="high" src="http://www.npr.org/design/flash_templates/preloaderAS3.swf" style="undefined" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="578" wmode="transparent"></embed> Tue, 15 May 2012 19:34:00 +0000 David Gilkey | NPR 11285 at http://wwno.org 'Close Encounters' With Gas Well Pollution http://wwno.org/post/close-encounters-gas-well-pollution Living in the middle of a natural gas boom can be pretty unsettling. The area around the town of Silt, Colo., used to be the kind of sleepy rural place where the tweet of birds was the most you would hear. Now it's hard to make out the birds because of the rumbling of natural gas drilling rigs.<p>The land here is steep cliffs and valleys. But bare splotches of earth called well pads are all over the place.<p>"That's the one I'm worried about because it just went in," says Tim Ray.<p>We're on his front porch just after sunset. Tue, 15 May 2012 19:33:00 +0000 Elizabeth Shogren 11144 at http://wwno.org Slideshow: Sick From Fracking? Doctors, Patients Seek Answers http://wwno.org/post/slideshow-sick-fracking-doctors-patients-seek-answers <embed allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" bgcolor="#FFFFFF" flashvars="thexml=http://media.npr.org/assets/multimedia/2012/05/cornerstone/&amp;theswf=http://media.npr.org/design/flash_templates/nprgallery_embed.swf?path=http://media.npr.org/assets/multimedia/2012/05/cornerstone/" height="463" id="soundslider" name="soundslider" quality="high" src="http://www.npr.org/design/flash_templates/preloaderAS3.swf" style="undefined" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="578" wmode="transparent"></embed> Tue, 15 May 2012 19:04:19 +0000 David Gilkey | NPR 11474 at http://wwno.org