FOOD & DINING

Jameson

Louisiana Eats: The Count, The Cooper And A Nip Of Courage

Behind every cocktail bar and liquor cabinet is a wealth of history and elaborate effort. On this week’s show, we take a look at some hidden elements of the cocktail industry. First, we meet Master Cooper Ger Buckley of Jameson, o ne of only four master coopers in Ireland, who creates and repairs whiskey barrels using age-old techniques. Ger tells us about his relationship to the craft and how he learned the art of the barrel. Next, we hop over to the Continent and speak with Count Eduardo...

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FOOD & DINING

The fried seafood boat at Morton's Seafood in Madisonville.
Ian McNulty

Where Y'Eat: The Seafood Boat Sails On At Old Fashioned New Orleans Eateries

The seafood boat is not a po-boy , and it’s different from a seafood platter. It belongs to its own niche. It flies brazenly in the face of modern low-carb diets, but survives at a handful of eateries. It can kindle cravings in those with a nostalgic bent, and maybe event those who enjoy a little spectacle with their supper.

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'Open Schools' Made Noise In The '70s; Now They're Just Noisy

It's a perennial debate in American education: Do kids learn best when they're sitting in rows at their desks? Or moving around, exploring on their own? Back in the 1960s and '70s, that debate led to a brand new school design: Small classrooms were out. Wide-open spaces were in. The Open Education movement was born. Across the U.S., schools were designed and built along these new ideas, with a new approach to the learning that would take place inside them. It was a response, historians say,...

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The Neighborhood Gallery celebrates it's 20th anniversary with the retrospective exhibit "Then and Now."

It may be Super Tuesday elsewhere, but in New Orleans, it's Fat Tuesday — Mardi Gras — the third since Hurricane Katrina. And with 12 days of parades and parties, the city is almost as festive as before the storm.

By 8 a.m. Tuesday, hundreds of people were gathering at the corner of Claiborne and Jackson for the start of the Zulu parade.

Larry Roy, resplendent in face paint, red satin coat and headdress, is the Zulu Krewe's Minister of Fun.

And as for any lingering effects of Hurricane Katrina, he said things have gotten better.

Roundtable: Edwards' Bid, Nagin's Complaint

Dec 29, 2006

Transcript

FARAI CHIDEYA, host:

This is NEWS & NOTES. I'm Farai Chideya.

On today's Roundtable, John Edwards aims for the presidency again, and the shrinking city of New Orleans.

Joining us is Joe Davidson, editor for The Washington Post; Mary Frances Berry, professor of history at the University of Pennsylvania, she is in New Orleans today; and Nat Irvin, professor of future studies at Wake Forest University, columnist for the Winston-Salem Journal. He is in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

A Conversation with Mayor Ray Nagin

Aug 29, 2006

Transcript

ED GORDON, host:

From NPR News, this is NEWS AND NOTES. I'm Ed Gordon.

Nagin Blamed for Crescent City's Rising Crime

Jul 25, 2006

Transcript

ED GORDON, host:

Nearly a year after Hurricane Katrina, the city of New Orleans is slowly returning to its old self, at least in one regard.

Crime is on the rise in the Big Easy, and commentator Jimi Izrael, for one, is relieved that things are getting back to normal. He says the return of the cities criminal element is evidence that the underlying problems in New Orleans haven't been addressed; and crime is a reminder that Mayor Ray Nagin and the city's leaders will have to work a lot harder to ensure a better future for low-income residents.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin won reelection over the weekend. Now he's planning to meet with key advisors to develop a 100-day plan. That 100 days will include the start of another hurricane season.

New Orleans residents have their own hopes for the coming months and years, as NPR's Cheryl Corley reports.

CHERYL CORLEY reporting:

New Orleans Politics, Post-Katrina

May 19, 2006

Farai Chideya talks with NPR political editor Ken Rudin for his political analysis of the upcoming mayoral runoff election in New Orleans. The race pits current Mayor Ray Nagin against Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

From NPR News this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

And I'm Michele Norris.

This weekend New Orleans voters will go to the poles to elect the man responsible for rebuilding the battered city. Incumbent Mayor Ray Nagin faces off against Lieutenant Governor Mitch Landrieu, the son of Moon Landrieu, the larger than life mayor who ran New Orleans through much of the 1970s.

It's the kind of thing that makes you wonder if we political types focus on the wrong thing.

New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin, in a tight runoff race with the state's current lieutenant governor to keep his post, vowed the city will be ready for the coming hurricane season and rebuffed claims in a recently published book that he was an ineffective leader as the storm ravaged the city last August.

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CLASSICAL MUSIC

Classical 104.9 FM

Beautiful classical music, from traditional to contemporary, on Classical 104.9

Tell Us Why You Love WWNO!

I Love WWNO! Once Upon a Time there was a listener (you) who lovingly and regularly tuned into their dearest public radio station (us), and it was an immediate “happily ever after” situation from then onward. This Valentine’s Day, New Orleans Public Radio is launching its first ever “I Love WWNO” campaign to help raise awareness about the importance of public radio, and to promote the value it has in our community.

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LE SHOW

Harry Shearer
Harry Shearer / Harry Shearer

Le Show For The Week Of March 26, 2017

This week on Le Show with Harry Shearer: The Appresidentice: Winning Looks Like Losing , News of Bad Banks , News from Outside the Bubble , We're Not #1 , News of the Warm , Read the Trades , News of the Olympic Movement , The Apologies of the Week , and more!

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