Robert Warren

In the past ten years, New Orleans has become known nationwide for education reform through charter schools. It's also earned a reputation as a hub for entrepreneurship. Those two worlds are coming together.

The 10th Annual Louisiana Smart Growth Summit explores best practices for statewide planning. The Center for Planning and Excellence, CPEX, runs the event Tuesday and Wednesday in Baton Rouge.

CPEX CEO Elizabeth Boo Thomas says what Louisiana really needs is transportation and housing.

Detroit Publishing Company photo via Library of Congress website

The Mississippi River ferry terminal downtown will soon be expanding. The city has received a $10 million federal grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation to develop the terminal at the end of Canal Street.

GNO Inc. CEO Michael Hecht stands in front of the Louis Armstrong Airport.
Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

Two transportation amendments are on this Saturday’s ballot. Amendments 1 and 2 would allow existing state revenues to be used for new roads and bridges, and to repair existing ones, without creating new taxes.

No one is against better roads, bridges and other infrastructure. How to fund it is the issue. Amendment 1 would allow oil and gas revenue from the state’s "Rainy Day Fund" to be used for transportation projects.

Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

  In New Orleans when we talk about "going to the airport" we automatically assume we’re talking about Louis Armstrong Airport in Kenner. But there's another airport. In Orleans Parish.

Lakefront Airport is over 80 years old. Not all those years have been great for business. For some of them the airport was boarded up. Today, Lakefront might finally be lining up for take off.

Right after Hurricane Katrina, tens of thousands of people rushed from New Orleans and elsewhere along the Gulf Coast to Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

The influx of evacuees and recovery crews was a recipe for road congestion. Traffic volumes hit 25-year projected growth overnight. There was gridlock in Louisiana’s capital city.

Louisiana’s first bike share program launches Tuesday at Northwestern State University in Natchitoches. Wesley Campus Ministry and local United Methodist Churches will run the program and loan out bikes to NSU students and BPCC @ NSU students who are 18 and older.

Eve Abrams

Ten years after New Orleans flooded following Hurricane Katrina, the city has regained roughly 79 percent of its population. But that doesn’t mean it has 79 percent of the same people.

Much has changed about where New Orleanians live, but one of the biggest is that 97,000 fewer black people live in Orleans Parish than before the storm. It’s hard to pin down exactly where everyone went, but you can get a glimpse of why on one particular street corner. Eve Abrams investigats how who gets on the Megabus tells the story of New Orleans’ diaspora.

Jason Saul

You don't realize how much you appreciate traffic lights until you have to drive around a city without any. This week on Katrina: The Debris, getting around New Orleans, during and after the storm.

Public input is sought for an unfinished and litigated expressway extension in south Shreveport that has kept public and private interests at loggerheads for years.

Two public comment meetings were held Thursday by the Louisiana Department of Transportation and local transportation leaders for stage 1 of a seven-step process. It began with a 10-minute slide show that provided a primer on the La. 3132 Inner Loop Expressway Stage 1 Environmental Study.