transportation

The Historic New Orleans Collection, Gift of Mr. David D. Plater [2003.0083.2.1]

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a two-part series on highways. The first looks at a controversy so intense, it’s called the ‘Second Battle of New Orleans.’

Cityscapes: New Orleans Almost Had A Monorail

Feb 4, 2016
Tulane Special Collections

New Orleans has various ways of transportation to get around the city including ferries, streetcars and buses.  However, in 1958 New Orleans planned to create a new form of getting around: a monorail. The idea of creating the monorail came from the city's urge to remain modern and keep up with Houston, which had recently passed New Orleans as the largest city in the region. 

Trey Fayard.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

There are places in the world nobody wants to be. Jail. Hospital. And stuck in an airport, which can feel like a combination of the previous two.

A Canal Street streetcar.
Nina Feldman / WWNO

Streetcars are an iconic part of New Orleans’ history, but they’re also a very real part of the transportation system. The city is investing more in the system, with a new Rampart Street line under construction.

The Regional Transit Authority says the new line will spur business and job growth, but local riders wonder if a streetcar is really the best way to get them to and from work – or if it’s more for tourists.

Robert Warren

In the past ten years, New Orleans has become known nationwide for education reform through charter schools. It's also earned a reputation as a hub for entrepreneurship. Those two worlds are coming together.

cpex.org

The 10th Annual Louisiana Smart Growth Summit explores best practices for statewide planning. The Center for Planning and Excellence, CPEX, runs the event Tuesday and Wednesday in Baton Rouge.

CPEX CEO Elizabeth Boo Thomas says what Louisiana really needs is transportation and housing.

Detroit Publishing Company photo via Library of Congress website

The Mississippi River ferry terminal downtown will soon be expanding. The city has received a $10 million federal grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation to develop the terminal at the end of Canal Street.

GNO Inc. CEO Michael Hecht stands in front of the Louis Armstrong Airport.
Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

Two transportation amendments are on this Saturday’s ballot. Amendments 1 and 2 would allow existing state revenues to be used for new roads and bridges, and to repair existing ones, without creating new taxes.

No one is against better roads, bridges and other infrastructure. How to fund it is the issue. Amendment 1 would allow oil and gas revenue from the state’s "Rainy Day Fund" to be used for transportation projects.

Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

  In New Orleans when we talk about "going to the airport" we automatically assume we’re talking about Louis Armstrong Airport in Kenner. But there's another airport. In Orleans Parish.

Lakefront Airport is over 80 years old. Not all those years have been great for business. For some of them the airport was boarded up. Today, Lakefront might finally be lining up for take off.

Right after Hurricane Katrina, tens of thousands of people rushed from New Orleans and elsewhere along the Gulf Coast to Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

The influx of evacuees and recovery crews was a recipe for road congestion. Traffic volumes hit 25-year projected growth overnight. There was gridlock in Louisiana’s capital city.

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