restaurants

Baskets of perfectly seasoned deep-fried chicken sizzle during lunch hour at Dooky Chase Restaurant in New Orleans, a city famous for its food. But the real magic happens early in the morning, when Leah Chase, 92, arrives to prepare the day's specials.

"I made meatloaf today. Smothered pork chops. I did oyster and artichoke soup," says Chase.

Dooky Chase is a landmark in the city's historically African-American Treme neighborhood.

Ian McNulty

Of all the facets of local life that have been up for re-evaluation lately, the New Orleans neighborhood restaurant might seem an unlikely candidate for change.

You know the places I’m talking about. They’re long on tradition, beloved and generally successful, sharing a common approach that New Orleans knows by heart. Why would anyone mess with that?

Ian McNulty

Food writer Ian McNulty on a surpiring new restaurant in New Orleans that's giving the notion of fusion a good name.

Ian McNulty

It was called a happy hour, but at this one the talk wasn’t so much about office politics or romantic prospects. Rather, the chatter centered on who had ever tried this and that fish before and, after tentative nibbles or bold gulps, how they all measured up to better-known staples of the Gulf Coast seafood menu.

Ian McNulty

Tracing the roots of a widespread network of New Orleans restaurateurs back to one Greek island and one shared American story.

“Opa!” that’s the universal Greek exclamation of joy, and you’ll be hearing it a lot this weekend as the Greek Festival returns to the Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Lakeview. But for some of those sharing in the opa spirit, the toast is about more than just the revelry of the moment.

Ian McNulty


Ian McNulty

Two restaurants with deep menus of traditional Chinese flavors seem to be hiding in plain sight directly across from each other along one of the area's busiest boulevards.

The sound of broiled oysters sizzling in their shells is a familiar one in southeast Louisiana, and it will always turn heads. But it wasn't just the sound effects or wafting smell of garlic that captured our attention as a waitress crossed the dining room with one particular order.

Ian McNulty

Eating your way through the deli — and falling for impulse-buy ceviche — at a new Latin American market in Mid-City.


Ian McNulty

After building familiarity and followings, one-time pop-up dining concepts are making the leap to become fulltime restaurants around New Orleans.

Food terms like pancit noodles, lumpia eggrolls and the pork and tamarind-based soup called sinigang are not exactly household words in New Orleans. But when the local chef Cristina Quackenbush debuted her new Filipino restaurant Milkfish she found a familiar crowd eager to dine on dishes like these, starting right on opening night.

Ian McNulty

From physical expansions to spin-offs to a high-profile second concept, ambitious chefs are finding different ways to expand while keeping the dining options coming.

Open a burger joint or coffee shop and the path to expansion can be as clear as a roadmap: find a good location and replicate.

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