recovery

In Baton Rouge, La., people are using whatever tools they have to help their community recover from the flood.

That includes cameras.

Four photographers have been creating portraits of those affected. Their project, "Humans of the Water," focuses not on what people lost, but on what they saved.

One of those photographers is Collin Richie. He says documentary photography isn't typically his style. Most of his work involves snapping photos for weddings, magazines and corporate advertisements.

Louisiana's love of gathering around food can be a tool to help people rebuild from disasters
Ian McNulty

When everything is torn apart, we gravitate to what brings us together. In Louisiana for all the hardships we’ve seen on the ragged edge of that equation, we’re fortunate to be so strong on the other side. Our shared food culture is one of those anchors.           
 

A home in the Brownfields neighborhood of Baton Rouge, August 17, 2016.
Jesse Hardman / WWNO

Floodwaters that have swamped at least 40,000 homes throughout south Louisiana have begun to recede, and people are returning to assess the devastation.

But returning to your home can be a dangerous, disgusting, heart-rending experience. Catherine Crowell, Director of Rebuilding Together New Orleans, has these tips on how to prepare for assessing, gutting and repairing your home after a flood disaster.

Officials gathered in the Lower Ninth Ward for a ribbon-cutting ceremony to mark the new CVS store. Festivities featured an unexpected reunion for Mayor Mitch Landrieu.

Bell School.
Eileen Fleming / WWNO

The former Bell School Campus in Treme is being transformed into residential and work space for artists and their families. The project is being led by the nonprofit Artspace. Eileen Fleming met up with Artspace spokesman Joe Butler for a look at the historic property – inside and out.

Jeff Horchoff points out bee boxes
Ryan Kailath / WWNO

Recovery efforts are in full swing on the Northshore, where some areas received record flooding. At Saint Joseph Abbey -- a seminary college just north of Covington -- the campus, which last flooded in 1926, received between 20 and 24 inches of flooding.

 


Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards joined New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu and other officials to announce $234 million of federal money awarded for helping the city and state better handle future water disasters.

It comes 10 years after a post-Katrina visit to the Netherlands for advice.

http://redevelop.nola.gov/opportunities/property-search

The City of New Orleans has revived a popular blight remediation program called the Lot Next Door. The New Orleans Redevelopment Authority starts taking applications for it Monday.

Four state-of-the-art autopsy stations at the new Coroner's Office headquarters replace a converted embalming room in the old office, a former funeral home.
Courtesy George Hero Architects

There is a new three-story, $14.8 million headquarters for the New Orleans Coroner's Office and for Emergency Medical Services, built with funds from FEMA, community development block grants, and a public bond issue. It represents an evolution in services to the community, says Coroner Dr. Jeffrey Rouse.

Ten years after Hurricane Katrina, the Federal Emergency Management Agency is settling up on how much it will pay to repair streets and sewer lines in New Orleans. Officials say much more than roadways can benefit.

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