NolaVie

New Orleans Summer And Other Harsh Truths

Sep 1, 2016


When I left New Orleans as a young adult to pursue an education and later a career in other parts of America, I quickly realized that simply being from the 504 carried with it a certain exotic quality. “Wait,” new acquaintances would say, “you’re actually from New Orleans? I never thought that someone could, you know...grow up there…”

About 200 people gathered at The Pavilion of the Two Sisters in City Park on Sunday for a memorial to cultural activist Sharon Litwin. 

  Leaders of the groups she helped over the years turned out to honor the British native who embraced New Orleans.

Anila Keswani
Anila Keswani / Nolavie

New Orleans’ roots are diverse. This summer, Nolavie is speaking with members of different communities that have woven their unique strands into the local culture. Today, Renee Peck speaks with restaurant owner Anila Keswani about her life in the Crescent City and her relationship to its Indian-American community.

You are about to enter another dimension. Not just one of sight and sound, but of mind. It is a dimension of costumed revelry and sugared cakes with plastic babies, of fanatics dressed in black and gold and sandwiches dressed with “mynez” and Crystal. A dimension of wild celebration of the human condition, a place where everyone is “dawlin” and no one is without a cold drink. 

There is a signpost up ahead. You are about to enter...The New Orleans Zone.

Angel Trumpets release some of the best smells in the city.
Scott Gold / Nolavie

When people fall in love with New Orleans -- a phenomenon that happens on a daily basis around here -- they’re wont to wax poetically about the familiar qualities that make this city such a special and enchanting place.

But all of this gushing tends to leave out a single and singular fact of life in the Crescent City: This town, for lack of a better word, smells.

Sharon Litwin.
NolaVie.com

A driving force behind the arts and cultural communities in New Orleans has passed away. 


Gia Hamilton, left, of The Joan Mitchell Center in New Orleans.
Tauriac Photography / The Joan Mitchell Center

The goal of the Joan Mitchell Center is to support emerging visual artists who live in New Orleans. That space is run by Gia Hamilton, who spoke with Sharon Litwin for the latest Notes from New Orleans.

Drummer Boyanna Trayanova And The Rhythm Of The Balkans

Jun 8, 2016
Just another day at the office for Boyanna Trayanova.
Kelley Crawford / Nolavie

In a city full of musicians, Boyanna Trayanova stands out. Offbeat Magazine has called her the best ska drummer in city, but she's just as likely to play traditional jazz, blues, or music from her Bulgarian homeland. She spoke with Kelley Crawford for NolaVie's series, Artists in Their Own Words

Rafael Saddy
Rafael Saddy / Nicaraguan Association of Louisiana

 The 6th annual Kenner Hispanic Fest is June 11th and 12th.  “You’re going to find Hondurans, you’re going to find folks from the Caribbean, you’re going to find folks from Central America, and from the U.S.” said Rafael Saddy, event coordinator of the Nicaraguan Association of Louisiana (ANDELA).  “This festival’s purpose was to integrate not only the Hispanic community as one community but also share with the entire community to come in for a day of family fun, music, and food.”

Street Economy: Fernando Lima Busks In The French Quarter

May 25, 2016
Fernando Lima, pianist
Daniel Grey / Nolavie

New Orleans has one of the most vibrant and unique street economies - with everything from musicians, dancers,  performance artists, poets and painters to the more hidden economies revolving around sex, drugs, and other hustles.

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