Bring Your Own Presents: 'In The East'

Sep 24, 2015
Claire Bangser

Bring Your Own is a nomadic storytelling series that takes place in living rooms, backyards and unconventional spaces within the community. Each month, eight storytellers have eight minutes to respond to a theme. BYO airs on All Things New Orleans and is a biweekly podcast on

US Army Corps of Engineers

Labor Day has passed. And while it would be foolish to open your doors expecting any hint of autumn breeze, early September this year does bring a particularly needed respite.

We will not be hearing the K-word, and its accompanying R-word, several times each day. Local outlets did their heavy lifting, looking back and looking forward. The national camera crews have packed up and headed back. The hotels have emptied of the many visiting journalists, charity and nonprofit workers, experts and onlookers.

When Stephen Colbert takes over the Late Show tonight on CBS, he'll have a new partner in crime on stage: pianist Jon Batiste.

On the morning of Aug. 28, 2005, the National Weather Service issued an urgent weather alert.

"Devastating damage expected," the message read. "Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks ... Perhaps longer."

A day later, on the morning of Aug. 29 — 10 years ago Saturday — Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast. By that afternoon, the storm had slowly moved on. It appeared that the worst was over.

  Louisiana Public Broadcasting’s award-winning documentarian Tika Laudun sat down to talk with WRKF’s Sue Lincoln about the making of “Katrina: 10 Years After”. The program premieres statewide on LPB and WYES August 29, 2015.

Terri Coleman, Gentilly resident and teacher at Dillard University
Rush Jagoe

You might have noticed a few cameras around town this week. Yes, the entire media world has descended on New Orleans.


But some reporters began digging around the city much earlier in the summer, in hopes of providing more in depth coverage. Anna Sale is the host of a year-old podcast from WNYC, the public radio station in New York City, called Death Sex & Money. Each episode focuses on one person, and gives them the chance to explore and dissect moments from their lives.

As we mark the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which devastated the Gulf Coast and killed more than 1,800 people in August of 2005, Here & Now listens back to some of the memorable moments from the storm and the news coverage.

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Christian and Grace Wilson Birch began dating in the summer of 2008 and were married in the fall of 2013.
Grace Wilson Birch

After New Orleans flooded in 2005, documentary filmmakers flocked to the city to tell its story. The city was still getting back on its feet when a film crew spoke with Grace Wilson Birch, a communication associate for the New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation.

When the movie was finally released, Grace was depicted as being in the dark about economic disparities in New Orleans. She remembers watching the film reluctantly with Christian Birch, her boyfriend at the time.

The Gulf of Mexico is a factory. That’s according documentary filmmaker Margaret Brown who grew up in Mobile, Alabama.

Brown’s film “The Great Invisible,” explores the lingering impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig disaster five years later. Eleven men died and more than 3 million barrels of crude spewed into the Gulf. Ferreting out the truth was a challenge for Brown whose 83 minute documentary airs today on PBS stations.