Louisiana News

Stories from our partner stations around the state, including WRKF in Baton Rouge, KEDM in Monroe and Red River Radio in Shreveport.

A new  trade days venue is coming to Lincoln Parish. 

Owner Rosie Morris says the project came about after she and her husband discussed developing six sites on their property in Lincoln Parish.  "We're repurposing old farm buildings, so most of our vendors will be indoors.  We hope to accommodate 40 vendors," says Morris.

She says the lock-and-leave facility features vendor areas, a food court, sports viewing area, and an event pavilion.

Louisiana’s first bike share program launches Tuesday at Northwestern State University in Natchitoches. Wesley Campus Ministry and local United Methodist Churches will run the program and loan out bikes to NSU students and BPCC @ NSU students who are 18 and older.

“We got new terms. Now we’ve got like ‘Super-PACs’, right?” NAACP attorney Alfreda Bester told Leaders With Vision during their informational luncheon on campaign finance last week.

But what are Super-PACs? Technically, under Louisiana law, they don’t exist.

“State law just calls everything a ‘political committee’,” Louisiana Board of Ethics administrator Kathleen Allen explained. “If you’ve got two or more persons supporting or opposing candidates, they’re just called a political committee.”

Roux Radio 8/21

Aug 21, 2015

On this week's show, renewal in Gardere, revamping the tax code and a shortage of primary care doctors.

Fighting Invasives

Aug 21, 2015

Invasive plants can be an exhausting problem for landowners.  It is an issue at Black Bayou Lake National Wildlife Refuge, where Chinese Tallow attempts to run wild.

"It is not too horrible at the refuge just yet, which is why we need to catch it early," says Nova Clarke, a ranger at Black Bayou.  "We want to prevent it from becoming a losing battle."

Gardere, a neighborhood synonymous with poverty, blight and crime, is changing for the better. Overall crime has declined in the last four years. A group of residents are working to make the area safer, smarter and friendlier.

I woke even earlier than usual each morning during our visit to Boston, our favorite summer destination. The time difference was the culprit. My body thought it was 6 a.m., my usual time to rise. So I was out the door of the Beacon Hill apartment we rented by 5:30. My wife and daughter never stirred. They slept under portable fans to drown out the street noise. It felt like sleeping in a wind tunnel but worked. Our heads were at curb-level in this basement abode in a five-story brownstone. It was strange to look out the windows and see people’s ankles as they walked by.

As F. King Alexander begins his third year leading the LSU System, he talks with Sue Lincoln about what he really expected when he took the job. He puts higher education funding concerns in perspective, and shares his goals for the years to come.

What do Louisiana’s statewide elected officials do when they’re off the clock?  Agriculture Commissioner Mike Strain invited me out to Covington, to show me.

“The main building here is over 10,500 square feet now,” Strain said, as he looked fondly at Claiborne Hill Veterinary Hospital.

“How big was it when you started?” I asked.

“15-hundred,” he said, as we walked in the front doors.

“These are the original doors. Just think how many times they have open and closed for healing, over the past 31 years,” he said with a smile, as a parakeet in a cage on the front counter began to chatter at him.

A juvenile justice reformer whose tactics to help troubled kids triggered nationwide changes in the justice system died earlier this month. The late Jerome G. Miller’s philosophy touched Caddo Parish, according to Caddo Juvenile Services Director Clay Walker.

“Fundamentally, that’s everything that we’re doing is from his model,” Walker said.

In the 1970s, Miller almost emptied the prison-like reformatories in Massachusetts and found avenues around incarceration as that state’s youth services commissioner.