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Eileen Fleming / WWNO

CourtWatch NOLA  has been gathering data on the Orleans Parish criminal justice system. The group found problems that include locking up poor people for failing to pay fines, and widely varying sentences.

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

A New Orleans neighborhood marker honoring World War Two soldiers erected in 1943 is being re-dedicated Sunday – the 15th anniversary of the September 11th attacks.  

The state health department has agreed to provide more bed space for Louisiana inmates found incompetent to stand trial and those found not guilty of crimes by reason of insanity. 

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And the cleanup continues after record floods devastated southern Louisiana. An estimated 3,000 residents are still in shelters waiting to find out where they will go next. Mallory Falk from member station WWNO visited one of those shelters.

The New Orleans Inspector General has released a four-year plan for overseeing several city agencies. 

The flooding that devastated Baton Rouge Louisiana this month is a grim reminder of the havoc that nature can wreak on residents of the state. Today marks 11 years since Hurricane Katrina made landfall on the Gulf Coast, killing more than 1,800 people and displacing a million others.

"It was wonderful to feel like I'd never have to be homeless again."

Myra Engrum is sitting in a McDonald's in Louisiana, steeling herself for another day of mucking out her flooded home. The parking lot is full of construction trucks and cars with a insurance company logos. A lot of meetings are happening here.

"I had over four and a half feet of water in my home, on the inside and outside," she says. "This is my first home that I ever purchased. I got the home right after Katrina."

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

The line formed early and wrapped around the community room at the St. Stephen Missionary Baptist Church in Algiers over the weekend. People were handing in guns to New Orleans police.

In Baton Rouge, La., people are using whatever tools they have to help their community recover from the flood.

That includes cameras.

Four photographers have been creating portraits of those affected. Their project, "Humans of the Water," focuses not on what people lost, but on what they saved.

One of those photographers is Collin Richie. He says documentary photography isn't typically his style. Most of his work involves snapping photos for weddings, magazines and corporate advertisements.

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