interviews

Dew Drop Inn
Courtesy of the Ralston Crawford Collection of Jazz Photography, Hogan Jazz Archive, Tulane Universtiy

On Lasalle St, just across from the former CJ Peete housing project, you can see the dilapidated sign of a New Orleans landmark: the Dew Drop Inn. From the 40s to 70s, in a time of segregation, the Dew Drop played the role of rooming house, barber shop, post office restaurant and above all the top night club in the African American community.

Ivy Billiot
American Routes

Each week, American Routes brings you Shortcuts, a sneak peek at the upcoming program. This week, we travel down the bayou to talk to Houma Indian wood carver Ivy Billiot. Host Nick Spitzer spoke with him about his connection to both the natural, and supernatural worlds. To hear the full show, listen on WWNO Saturdays at 7 or at at American routes.org.

Doc Hawley first started working on riverboats in 1957 and stayed on board until his retirement a few years ago.
Historic New Orleans Collection / Historic New Orleans Collection

Every day in the French Quarter people are drawn – almost magnetically - to the riverboat calliope. There is an undeniable nostalgic sound to it and it may even remind you of childhood. But romance aside, this icon of Americana has its own history, which Captain Doc Hawley shared with the Historic New Orleans Collection and Nola Life Stories.

Buddy Mils
American Routes

Each week, American Routes Shortcuts gives you a sneak peak into the upcoming American Routes episodes. This week, it's Horsepower, a look at the life of the modern cowboy. Host Nick Spitzer introduces us to two Florida Cowboys.

Sonny Burgess
American Routes

  Each week, American Routes Shortcuts gives a sneak peak of the upcoming American Routes episode. This week, Sonny Burgess. Sonny grew up in Newport Arkansas. He was a part of the first generation of musicians to mix country music with blues to make a new genre: rockabilly.

Guests on this week's show.
Music Inside Out

In case you’re wondering — yes, this is a Best of Music Inside Out program. But the topic is universal. The songs we hear as children — even the ones we don’t like — help shape our feelings about the music we love as adults.

Nearly all of the guests who’ve appeared on Music Inside Out have talked about the songs they heard growing up. And those early songs and artists are partially responsible for the unique and varied musical landscape of Louisiana. What goes into little ears often helps build music careers. And, for that, we are grateful.

Lewis Family Museum
American Routes

This week on American Routes: how do we preserve the power of music in museum and memory? Jerry Lee Lewis was born in 1935 Ferriday, LA. The house he grew up in is now a museum, filled with family memorabilia ranging from religious art work to bodies, buried in the front yard. Host Nick Spitzer spent an afternoon with sister Frankie Jean, the curator of Lewis museum.

A.J. Croce
Shelby Duncan / Music Inside Out

It’s easy to tease out the artists who’ve inspired A.J. Croce’s singing over the years — Ray Charles, Paul McCartney*, Buddy Holly, even Ray Davies of The Kinks. He loves early rock n roll and R&B. So perhaps it’s ironic that A.J. rarely sounds like his father, singer-songwriter Jim Croce, who made his mark on music in the late 1960s and early 70s.

A paper edit of a Music Inside Out interview.
Music Inside Out

Over the years at MIO, we’ve heard from an enormous variety of artists… Vocalists, pianists, guitarists and brass; composers, songwriters and producers; jazzmen, opera singers and artists that defy category. But no matter the background, style or vocation, all of our artists have a lot of stories to tell… so many, in fact, that we can’t always fit them in a single hour!

This week on Music Inside Out, we’re bringing you those all those clips that were just too good to leave on the cutting room floor!

William Widmer / Slate

The New Orleans teaching force changed dramatically after Hurricane Katrina, when all public school teachers were laid off. They were mostly black, veteran educators from the area. Now, teachers are more likely to be young, white and to have grown up outside New Orleans.

Pages