industry

Did you know a piece of paper could kill? Natchitoches Rep. Kenny Cox found that out Wednesday, when the fiscal note for his HB 590 was delivered just a few minutes before its hearing in the House Natural Resources Committee.

Cox’s bill would require industrial plants to install air quality monitors along their fence lines.

“This bill is about safety: safety for the people who live along the fence lines,” Cox said in explanation of the proposed law.

Before too much testimony on the bill was given, Houma Rep. Joe Harrison advised Cox that the estimated state cost for implementing the bill – the fiscal note – was going to be the real issue.

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

Five years ago an off-shore explosion killed 11 workers and created a massive 210 million gallon spill in the Gulf of Mexico. There have been questions ever since about how the accident could have been prevented and how to improve off-shore safety standards.

Carl Moore started working on off-shore supply boats back in the 1980s.

Thousands of oil and gas industry operators are filing through the Shreveport Convention Center for a trade show that is focused on serving the oil patch.

The Ark-La-Tex Oilfield Expo has 364 exhibitors packed into a 95,000 square-foot exhibit hall. The expo relocated from Longview this year due to growing demand.

The expo is put on by Longview-based Texas Classic Productions. Creative director Amy Double says the environment is ripe for business deals, especially at a time when operators are cutting costs.

More than 150 timber landowners are participating in Tuesday’s Central Louisiana Forestry Forum. LSU AgCenter forestry extension agent Robbie Hutchins organized the meeting. He says the state’s timber industry has fully recovered from the 2008 financial crisis, due in large part to an emerging market for woody biomass.

“Forestry has bounced back and is now stronger than ever. That’s a great plus for Louisiana. But the big thing for us as forest landowners is the opportunity for alternate markets, nontraditional markets to market our resource,” Hutchins said.

Jacinta Quesada/FEMA / Wikimedia Commons

This weekend, Louisiana workers joined the largest national oil refinery strike in over 30 years. 1,350 employees from the Motiva refineries in Convent and Norco, Louisiana, joined fellow members of the United Steelworkers union in asking the industry to change the current safety requirements. 

Chet Overall / It's New Orleans

In 1814 it was the British who were "runnin' down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico." Today, ships of almost every nationality are steaming down the river to the Gulf. 54 of them belong to International Shipholding. Their fleet of cargo vessels ply international trade from their current headquarters in Mobile, Alabama but they're set to return soon to their original home in New Orleans.

Port of New Orleans

The Port of New Orleans has completed one of the heaviest cargo lifts in its history.

It moved a 718-ton tower from a ship to a barge.

The absorption tower is bound for a major plant expansion in Donaldsonville.

The 164-foot-long unit arrived at the port January 10 from Shanghai, China. It was moved at the port this week at the Louisiana Avenue wharf.

Port president Gary LaGrange says the operation shows the port’s ability to handle large and complex cargo.

A state judge has ruled that the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources was too quick in granting a permit for a proposed coal export terminal in Plaquemines Parish.

State Judge Kevin D. Conner in Belle Chasse ruled that the state agency should not have granted a permit to RAM Terminals LLC because too little research was done into alternative locations for the terminal. Conner ordered DNR to re-evaluate the permit. His ruling was dated Dec. 23 but the plaintiffs received notice of it on Tuesday.

Cityscapes: When St. Bernard Made Cars

Nov 7, 2014
TheHenryFord.org

In this month's Cityscapes column for NOLA.com and The Times-Picayune, geographer Richard Campanella chooses another industrial subject. The Ford Motor Co. plant in Arabi, along the Mississippi River in St. Bernard Parish, employed hundreds of local workers, starting in the early 1920s.

Hercules Offshore says it will lay off 324 offshore Gulf of Mexico workers because of a decline in business.

The move represents about 15 percent of its workforce.

The Houston-based drilling rig contractor sent a letter to the Texas Workforce Commission last week, saying the company would lay off the employees by the end of the year.

The layoffs involve employees who work out of Port Fourchon, Grand Isle, Berwick, Cameron, Abbeville, Lafitte, Larose and Venice.

The company announced an $88.6 million third quarter loss on October 23.

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