Hollywood South

Louisiana Research Collection

A century before New Orleans was dubbed “Hollywood South,” the Crescent City was poised to become a major center for silent film studios. Producer Eve Abrams spoke with Tulane professor of communications Vicki Mayer about her Summer 2015 article for Louisiana Cultural Vistas Magazine, “Film Follies,” and about how the movie industry, culture, and the political economy intersect in Louisiana.

Louisiana’s budget problems have many criticizing the tax incentives for the entertainment industry, which cost the state about $250-million last year. A legislative task force has been looking into ways to curb fraud in the film program. They met last week, to discuss the thrust of bills they may file in the upcoming legislative session.

“These are various common-sense measures that we think can be taken to perhaps make it a little bit less easy to steal from these programs,” Louisiana Inspector General Stephen Street said, as he prepared to give the panel suggestions based on his experiences investigating problems with the programs.

Kate Richardson / WWNO

The entertainment industry is synonymous with Hollywood. But in recent years lots of film and TV production has migrated to what’s now become commonly known as “Hollywood South.” Louisiana and Georgia form the core of this new industry hub because both states offer tax incentives to film and TV productions. 

The ape army descends upon the ravaged remains of San Francisco. Their leader addresses the surviving humans:

“APES DO NOT! WANT! WAR!” 

Tommy Hughes

Actress Francine Segal played prison guard Georgia Ann Payne in 2001’s Monster’s Ball, starring Billy Bob Thornton, Halle Berry and the late Heath Ledger. “I had a gun. It was a lot of fun,” said Segal.

There was some trouble on the set, however, as Ledger was not getting along with the dialect coach that had been brought in from L.A. to help him learn the thick Georgia accent his role called for.

Grant Morris / It's New Orleans

The film business continues to grow so quickly that the term "Hollywood South" is becoming less of a quaint marketing moniker and more literally true with every movie that shoots here. Part of the reason for the growth is financial — state tax credits — and the other part is the crew and facilities now available here.

Hollywood South Casting Finds Local Talent, Anywhere

Dec 9, 2013
Allen Murabayashi

Thanks to today’s technology, we can now do many things without leaving the comfort of our homes.  That now includes becoming a movie star. Casting director James Bearb, founder and CEO of Hollywood South Casting discusses this evolving facet of the film industry.  

Take Five: James Franco's 'Sal' Reveals True Sal Mineo

Nov 11, 2013
Tribeca Film

He was nominated for an Academy Award for his role in Rebel Without a Cause. At the height of his fame, he needed bodyguards to help him get through mobs of adoring fans. And, in the prime of his life, he died tragically. Not James Dean — Sal Mineo. James Franco’s recently released biopic follows the last day of Mineo's brief life.

Take Five: For Filmmaker, 'Tradition Is A Temple'

Oct 14, 2013
Image by Darren Hoffman, James Laxton and Ryland Jones

People come from all over the world to experience traditional New Orleans music. But not everyone has that privilege. For those who can't make the trip, a new documentary may be the next best thing.  

When Darren Hoffman heard the song "Discipline Strikes Again" by Jason Marsalis, something clicked in his mind.

“When I heard this, it was one of the first times in many years that I was inspired to create a music video,” says Hoffman.

Take Five: LSU Alumni Present 'King of Herrings'

Sep 8, 2013
Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

Looking towards the upcoming New Orleans Film Festival,  actors David Jensen and Joe Chrest discuss their entry, King of Herrings. These are two of five men that met back when they attended LSU, but never had the chance to collaborate. We find out what it was like for them to finally make a movie together after 25 years.

Zak Moses

This week on Inside the Arts, we talk with playwright Jim Fitzmorris and actor A.J. Allegra about The NOLA Project’s latest productionA Truckload of Ink. It is an original work exploring massive changes at a New Orleans newspaper.

Plus, you’ll find out why a 20-piece brass band from Providence, Rhode Island calls New Orleans their sister city.  And then, we’ll tour what is now the largest recording studio in the state. 

Pages