We've got a veritable cornucopia of Thanksgiving stories to share on this week's Louisiana Eats!
vxla / Flickr

This week on Louisiana Eats!, we gather around the table to delve into Thanksgiving traditions old and new. We hear about an unlikely culinary partnership between cookbook author Brandon Schultz and his cat, Lucy Schultz-Osenlund, who collaborated on a cookbook called Cooking for Two: Your Cat & You, a collection of recipes that will appeal to both man and man's best feline friend. Brandon tells us how he and Lucy celebrate something we're calling Catsgiving.

Stephanie Ryan Cameron / Save Our Cemeteries

Archdiocese of New Orleans All Saints Day Mass and Blessings of the Graves – November 1, 2015.

The Archdiocese of New Orleans will be performing a special Mass and Blessings of the Graves in honor of the holiday.

Ian McNulty

Father’s Day, food and being there when the stories start percolating around the table.

Dad cooked a lot of the breakfasts when I was growing up. Pancakes were usually the order of the day, but no matter what he was making the meal usually included a little baloney.

Cooking seemed to put dad in the mood for stories, some about his days in the army, some about the dubious adventures he and his brothers got into when they were young. As the syrup and butter went on the pancakes, so the exaggeration and embroidery built these stories up to Paul Bunyan proportions.

Infrogmation of New Orleans / Flickr

This week, we are headed straight to the living room. But we don’t mean the living room in your house; we’re talking about the nearest Irish Pub! In honor of St. Patrick’s Day, Louisiana Eats! is exploring all things Irish.

Tulane History Professor and author of the new book “The Irish in New Orleans,” Laura Kelley gives us a history of Irish immigrants in the Crescent City and how they influenced Louisiana culture in some unexpected ways.

Ian McNulty

At the intersection of St. Patrick's Day and St. Joseph's Day in New Orleans, food-centric celebrations abound, but so do some unique hazards for the unwary.

snowpea&bokchoi / Flickr

Vietnamese New Year was officially Thursday, but the festivities in New Orleans East have just started. The largest of these events is a three-day Tet festival hosted by Mary Queen of Vietnam Church (14001 Dwyer Blvd.) beginning Friday, February 20 at 6:30 p.m.

Drawing in thousands of locals and visitors from across the region, the neighborhood festival features live music, dancing, fireworks and, of course, exceptional Vietnamese cuisine. Food writer Ian McNulty gives Poppy the scoop on what dishes to sample this weekend and why you should arrive with an empty stomach.

Kenny Louie / Flickr

Mardi Gras may be over, but festivities for the Lunar New Year have just begun! On this week's Louisiana Eats!, we celebrate the Year of the Goat the way they do in China, with a baijiu toast, courtesy of baijiu enthusiast Derek Sandhaus. Derek explains to us the story behind the ancient Chinese liquor and its recent emergence in the West.

Then we'll check in with our roving reporter Ian McNulty about this weekend's Tet Festival at Mary Queen of Vietnam in New Orleans East. Gabriella Gershonson of Every Day With Rachel Ray shows us how to host a dim sum brunch. Finally, John Georges, Master Distiller of Angostura Rum, gives us a look at how they ferment, distil and age their famous liquor.

Ian McNulty

It sounds so fundamentally good, so easy, so natural — it’s dinner out on the town with someone special, with your sweetheart. Well, pull your head out of the clouds, lover boy, because this is no time to be getting all mushy. This is Valentine’s Day. And this is serious business.

You know you’ve been there—churning stomach and pounding head the morning after a party. So what do you do to alleviate the self-inflicted misery of a hangover?

It’s a bit of a blue Christmas in New Iberia.

Some people are complaining that the city’s Christmas lights are too subdued this year.

But the blue lights lining trees, store windows and other decorations on Main Street are a memorial to a home-town artist — George Rodrigue. His blue dog paintings became internationally famous.

Rodrigue died a year ago.

Phyllis Mata of the Magic on Main committee tells The Daily Iberian that the change from white lights is temporary.