Historic New Orleans Collection

The National WWII Museum

Inspired by the stories of World War II veterans, the late University of New Orleans historian Stephen Ambrose wanted to build a museum that would honor their experience.

courtesy of the Holden Family Collection

Most Americans hear the phrase “slave trade” and picture ships sailing across the Atlantic Ocean, with captured Africans chained inside, terrorized and sick. But twice as many people were sold in the domestic slave trade, which forcibly moved over a million people, primarily from the Upper South to the Lower South, primarily over land and on foot.

After the United States outlawed international slave trading in 1808, New Orleans became home to the nation’s largest domestic slave market.

The Historic New Orleans Collection

For 37 years, John Bullard directed the New Orleans Museum of Art and oversaw many blockbuster shows during his tenure.

Courtesy of The Historic New Orleans Collection

This episode of Louisiana Eats! examines African-American culinary life and culture in slavery times and today. Historic New Orleans Collection curator Erin Greenwald gives us a private tour of Purchased Lives: New Orleans and the Domestic Slave Trade, 1808–1865, an exhibit that examines the domestic slave trade in America. Solomon Northup, the free man of color who wrote the memoir "Twelve Years A Slave," comes to life with some amazing documents that shed light on his true story.

The Historic New Orleans Collection

Thursday marked the 200th anniversary of the Battle of New Orleans, which influenced the course of American history and propelled Andrew Jackson to the Presidency.

The Historic New Orleans Collection currently has an exhibition on view entitled Andrew Jackson: Hero of New Orleans. WWNO’s Paul Maassen talked to HNOC’s Associate Director for the Williams Research Center, Jason Wiese, about the exhibit, Jackson, and the Battle's anniversary.

Historic New Orleans Collection

JoAnn Clevenger had never even heard of Mardi Gras until she moved to New Orleans in the late 1950’s. She dropped out of Tulane to care for her mother and then moved to the French Quarter shortly thereafter. At that point in her life the jazz clubs, restaurants and literary circles she hung around weren’t like anything she’d seen.

    

Historic New Orleans Collection

When Rene Brunet Jr. was a kid, his father owned the Imperial Theater, a single-screen movie house in Mid-City. At the time, movie theaters were neighborhood institutions and played to the vaudeville expectations of the audience. But from the time he was a child, Rene saw the film industry undergo one transformation after another, which put his family’s business under constant pressure to change or get out of the way.   

Historic New Orleans Collection

When the Supreme Court unanimously ruled that separate black and white schools were unconstitutional in Brown v. Board of Education, it seemed desegregation was close at hand. But it took six years before the New Orleans school system was integrated. In the fall of 1960, Leona Tate — then only 6 years old — was one of four young black girls escorted through a crowd of protestors.

The Historic New Orleans Collection

Angus Lind’s column in The Times-Picayune documented things that he described as, “a little offbeat”:  people, places and events that gave New Orleans its local color. But that didn’t come until later in his career. When he got started in the early 1970s as a young man, Angus was a general-assignment reporter who cut his teeth on a series of tragic events within a single calendar year.

Historic New Orleans Collection

As the Director of Public Relations for the 1984 World's Fair, Jeanne Nathan had her work cut out for her.

The fair not only had to compete with the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, but it was challenged by an oil crash, political conflict, and bad publicity. It remains the only World’s Fair to declare bankruptcy during its run. Despite that, Jeanne feels New Orleans learned invaluable lessons in tourism and marketing that are still used today, but will be the first to admit that handling the Fair’s image was a constant uphill battle. 

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