Food

Bingsu, a traditional shaved ice dessert at Little Korea BBQ in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

Back in the early days for Angelo Brocato Ice Cream, back when it started in the French Quarter more than a century ago, it was common for customers to queue up on hot summer mornings toting their own pitchers.

Host Poppy Tooker and French Truck Coffee owner Geoffrey Meeker
Reggie Morris

 

On this week’s show, we’re taking a look at the coffee and tea scene across Louisiana.

 

We begin with Geoffrey Meeker, owner of French Truck Coffee. It took only one cup of coffee from San Francisco to inspire him to become a New Orleans coffee purveyor. Now, Geoffrey and his team are at the vanguard of what many are calling the third wave coffee movement.

Watermelnon is a symbol of the summer season and relief from it, all under one rind.
Ian McNulty

A nice thick cut of watermelon is a symbol of summer and relief from it, all under one rind. Picture a bowl of watermelon glistening at the end of a picnic buffet or whole melons stacked along a roadside vendor’s dented tailgate, all green like gators and nearly as big. Conjure an image of kids spitting seeds into shaggy summer grass or of paper towels blushing pink with juice. Think about your first bite into the tip of a triangle of watermelon after you’ve worked up a thirst. It’s the look, smell and taste of simple summer pleasure.

There may be no way to improve on it. But that doesn't mean it isn’t fun to try, and this summer New Orleans has presented an abundant melon patch of examples.

Smoot's Grocery owner Dub Rogers
Poppy Tooker

 

On this week's show, we're celebrating the tricentennial of Natchez, Mississippi. We'll visit our neighbors across the river and learn how residents are combining history and innovation to make Natchez a singular destination.

Honduran style ceviche from the Pupusa Lady, a stand at the New Orleans food court Roux Carre.
Ian McNulty

At some point, New Orleans gets so damn hot you’re ready to let someone else do the cooking. Lately one of my top candidates for that job has been citrus.

That’s the alchemy of ceviche, the way citric acid from lime and other fruit transforms raw seafood without going anywhere near the stove. The texture tightens, its surface whitens and the result is a bracingly bright, utterly light seafood dish that feels so in synch with the season.

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The Splendid Table

The Wisconsin supper club is something so unique to its region of the U.S. that someone really needed to make a movie about it. Holly De Ruyter has done just that with her documentary, "Old Fashioned." She tells Shauna Sever about the history of this Badger State institution, the importance of the bar, and what you'll find on a relish tray.

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All photos courtesy Ann Bancroft

Polar explorer and adventurer Ann Bancroft's latest project is "Access Water," a world-spanning journey that looks to document the world's fresh water shortage. She recently returned from a trip down India's Ganges River, and shared her experiences with Lynne Rossetto Kasper.

Lynne Rossetto Kasper: The project is “Access Water.” Explain what this is about.

Sabrina Ghayour's simple shortcuts

Aug 4, 2016
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Haarala Hamilton

Sabrina Ghayour cooks up simple, Middle Eastern-influenced dishes with a modern twist in her second cookbook, Sirocco. She tells Russ Parsons about the shortcuts she's found to traditional Persian methods (despite some skeptical aunts) and the spices she relies on in her kitchen.

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Noah Fecks

Tyler Kord, chef-owner of No. 7 Restaurant and No. 7 Sub, and author of the wonderfully titled A Super Upsetting Cookbook About Sandwiches, argues that vegetables are the equal of roast beef for sandwiches, makes the case for less-than-perfect ingredients, and asks you (yes, you) to reconsider that to-go bag.

Celery goes to war

Aug 2, 2016
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Photopips/Thinkstock

You may not know it, but celery is an herb. "Queen of Herbs" Jekka McVikar knows this, hence her title. She shares its history, and its potential for helping a common ailment, with Lynne Rossetto Kasper.

Lynne Rossetto Kasper: I'd like to talk to you about celery leaves. No one thinks of celery leaves as an herb.

Jekka McVicar: No. The Latin is Apium graveolens. Now, are you sitting comfortably?

LRK: I am very comfortable.

Jekka McVicar

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