St. Tammany Parish is hosting two meetings this week to help flooded homeowners with paperwork for home elevation funds granted by the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

The first meeting is 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday afternoon in Mandeville, at the St. Tammany Parish Council Chambers, 21490 Koop Drive.


The second meeting is 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Thursday afternoon in Slidell, on the fifth floor of the Towers Administration Building, 520 Old Spanish Trail.


Ten years after Hurricane Katrina, the Federal Emergency Management Agency is settling up on how much it will pay to repair streets and sewer lines in New Orleans. Officials say much more than roadways can benefit.

cmh2315fl / Flickr

The federal government has canceled $5.9 million in disaster loans given to Plaquemines Parish after Hurricane Katrina.

Parish President Billy Nungesser says the action was taken by the Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

Nungesser says the parish now must repay the remaining $3 million of $8.9 million in special community disaster loans it received after the 2005 storm.

Nungesser says he plans to try to get the remaining amount forgiven.

swa182 / Shutterstock.com

Business and political leaders are meeting in New Orleans Friday to discuss ways of providing affordable flood insurance.

FEMA Administrator David Miller will be explaining how it's assembling maps that are used for setting flood insurance premiums.

The meeting was arranged by GNO, Inc. The business development group led a drive to revamp legislation that could have resulted in some premiums rising from less than $1,000 to tens of thousands of dollars.

GNO, Inc. President Michael Hecht says it may be time to review the overall process for getting flood insurance.

Non-Flood Protection Asset Management Agency

Lakefront Airport has been restored to its Art Deco glory days. A $20 million restoration has left the terminal looking as Huey Long once left it.

Office of Senator Mary Landrieu

Louisiana public officials are launching a bipartisan battle to revamp proposed changes to the National Flood Insurance Program. The administrator evaluating the objections was taken on a helicopter tour of coastal regions possibly facing steep premium hikes.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency has issued new preliminary flood maps.

Louisiana’s delegation in Washington, D.C. is griping over FEMA’s disregard of local flood protection measures when it drew them.

Meanwhile, unless Congress succeeds in passing a delay, federal flood insurance rates are set to go up dramatically as soon as October. Many in Louisiana are facing increases of 20 percent or more.

And, as ProPublica reporter Theo Meyer has found, some may end up paying for insurance they don’t need.

Read the ProPublica article: Using Outdated Data, FEMA Is Wrongly Placing Homeowners in Flood Zones

Share your story: Tell ProPublica About Flood Map Problems Where You Live


The Federal Emergency Management Agency has released new preliminary flood maps for Jefferson Parish, and are asking the public to participate in a 90-day comment period.

Flood maps are created by FEMA, in conjunction with the Army Corps of Engineers and local officials, and are used to calculate flood risk and determine flood insurance rates. The public comment period is an opportunity for residents, renters and business owners to review the maps and comment on them file appeals — the agency will accept public comment until September 30.

U.S. Sen. Mary L. Landrieu says $6 million in disaster recovery grants related to Hurricanes Isaac and Katrina are heading to Louisiana.

Landrieu says the funds are provided through the Federal Emergency Management Agency's Public Assistance Program.

Landrieu said Wednesday that $3.7 million will go to the state Department of Agriculture and Forestry for emergency protective measures and fuel distribution as a result of Isaac.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency is providing $19 million for flood mitigation efforts at nine sewerage pump stations in New Orleans.

Sen. Mary Landrieu, a Louisiana Democrat, said in a statement Friday that improving the sewerage infrastructure can help the city prepare for reduce the impact of a natural disaster.

The FEMA grant will pay for elevating and hardening the pump stations to prevent the kind of flood damage that occurred during hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005.