Features

Northshore Focus
9:16 am
Wed March 25, 2015

St. Tammany Humane Society Helps Animals And Their Owners

A long line snakes around the parking lot at the Castine Center near Mandeville as people wait to get vaccinations for their dogs at the St. Tammany Parish Humane Society's annual low cost vaccination and adoption event.
Credit Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Stray animals are a big problem all over Louisiana, including on the Northshore. Once a year the St. Tammany Parish Humane Society organizes with other local shelters to provide a huge low-cost vaccination clinic and adoption event called Woofstock.

Norman Billiot of Lacombe stood in a long line that stretched far down the block outside a big building at Pelican Park in Mandeville.

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Features
4:59 am
Wed March 18, 2015

Staying Local With Big Freedia At BUKU Fest

WWNO's Laine Kaplan-Levenson talks to Big Freedia at the 2015 BUKU Music + Art Project
Emily Kaplan-Levenson WWNO

Last weekend, Spring Break vibes descended upon the riverfront in the form of neon, midriffs and pounding bass. The BUKU Music and Art Project swarmed Mardi Gras World with big names like STS9, TV On the Radio, and A$AP Rocky, and more underground acts like Run the Jewels and Odesza, for a mostly collegiate (and younger) crowd to rejoice in. 

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Features
4:38 pm
Fri March 13, 2015

Cityscapes: The Origins of New Orleans' Chinatown (And A Tennessee Williams Connection)

Chinese-Americans who had operated small shops in New Orleans' Chinatown for many decades learned on Aug. 20, 1937 that their small enclave was doomed to make way for a parking lot. Pictured in this 1937 photo in front of one of the shops on Tulane Avenue
Nola.com The Times-Picayune Archive

Every month WWNO talks to Richard Campanella about his Cityscapes column for Nola.com. In this edition the Professor of Geography at the Tulane School of Architecture delves into the former Chinatown, and the history of Chinese-Americans in the city.

Chinese immigrants were first brought to Louisiana in hopes that they would work as inexpensive labor for sugar plantations after the Civil War. When that didn't work out, they began to move to the city.

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Bring Your Own
5:37 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Bring Your Own Presents: 'A Big Deal'

James and his dad.

Bring Your Own is a nomadic storytelling series that takes place in living rooms, backyards and other intimate spaces within the community. Each month, eight storytellers have seven minutes to respond to a theme. BYO airs on All Things New Orleans and is a biweekly podcast on WWNO.org.

This story was told at the winners circle edition on February 26, 2015 at the Broad Theater. The theme of the evening was “Can of Worms,” and James Hamilton recalled how the D.A.R.E program kept him off drugs…until it didn’t.

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Louisiana Cultural Vistas
8:05 am
Wed March 11, 2015

The Irish Have Been Part Of New Orleans From The Beginning

Laura D. Kelley in front of St. Alphonsus Church in the heart of the Irish Channel in New Orleans.
Paula Burch

There’s a joke that approximately 40 million Americans descend from Irish Immigrants, but on St. Patrick's Day, that number swells to 100 million.

In our latest collaboration with Louisiana Cultural Vistas, Eve Abrams leads us back to New Orleans’ first St. Patrick’s Day festivity and traces why, over 200 years later, we’re still celebrating come March 17.

New Orleans, we know, is a city made of layers. Historian Laura Kelley decided to peel off the Irish one. Why? She explains:

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Northshore Focus
7:18 am
Wed March 11, 2015

Northshore Shelter Provides Safety For Victims Of Human Trafficking

Beth Salcedo, cofounder of the Free Indeed Home for underage victims of human trafficking, sits in one of the rooms she decorated.
Credit Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Rafael and Beth Salcedo have a mission — to help underage victims of human trafficking. Their newly-licensed shelter is intended to help young girls across the south.

 

Rafael Salcedo used to work as a counselor for the Department of Family and Children’s services. A few years ago he started to see young clients who had been victims of sex trafficking. It was disturbing to him and his wife Beth.

 

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Features
7:36 pm
Mon March 9, 2015

A Playground For Innovators At The New Orleans Mini Maker Faire

VIP badges at the Maker Faire contained a full Arduino, essentially making it a tiny programmable computer.
Janaya Williams WWNO

Tulane University hosted the second annual New Orleans Mini Maker Faire on Saturday.

Maker Faires are growing in popularity around the country. They’re described as part science fair, part county fair, and “the greatest show and tell on earth.”

While they mainly showcase do-it-yourselfers exploring new technologies, the faires also also draw people experimenting in science, engineering, art, and performance.

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Code Switch
10:58 am
Fri March 6, 2015

The Fascinating Story Of New Orleans' Two Lost Chinatowns

Chinese who operated small shops in New Orleans' Chinatown for many decades learned in 1937 that their small city-within-a-city was doomed to make way for a parking lot. Shown in front of one of the shops on Tulane Avenue between Elk Place and Rampart Street are Big Gee, seated, and Lee Sing, standing.
The Times-Picayune/Landov

New Orleans is known for its enormous Vietnamese population, one of the largest in the country. But we recently came across a story about a now-lost Chinatown in New Orleans — two of them, in fact — and how they came to be. To understand how these hubs came about, and why they disappeared, we have to rewind the clock 150 years, to the end of the Civil War.

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Features
3:03 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

'Rock Star Nurse' Fights Ebola

Yanti Turang is an indie rock singer-turned-nurse and founder of Learn to Live. (learntoliveglobal.org)

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 9:31 am

As the threat of Ebola has left the U.S. and the story has left the headlines, people are still heading over to West Africa to fight the virus that has claimed nearly 10,000 lives.

Yanti Turang is one of those going. The indie rock band singer-turned-nurse and founder of the nonprofit LearnToLive is heading to Sierra Leone to help save lives.

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Bring Your Own
8:04 am
Thu February 19, 2015

Bring Your Own Presents: 'The Royal Dukes Of Rhythm At Lincoln Beach'

Drummers at the funeral of jazz legend Danny Barker. They include Louis Cottrell, (great-grandson of New Orleans' innovative drumming pioneer, Louis Cottrell, Sr. and grandson of New Orleans clarinetist Louis Cottrell, Jr.) of the Young Tuxedo Brass Band, far right; Louis "Bicycle Lewie" Lederman of the Down & Dirty Brass band, second from right.
Credit Infrogmation / Wikimedia Commons

Bring Your Own is a nomadic storytelling series that takes place in living rooms, backyards and other intimate spaces within the community. Each month, seven storytellers have eight minutes to respond to a theme. BYO airs on All Things New Orleans and is a biweekly podcast on WWNO.org.

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