features

Music
9:53 am
Tue July 29, 2014

The Root Progression: Teaching In A Uniquely New Orleans Way At The Heritage School Of Music

The Don Jamison Heritage School of Music will soon move into its first permanent home on Rampart Street.
Credit Jazz & Heritage Foundation

This fall, the 25-year-old Don Jamison Heritage School of Music will move into its first permanent home on Rampart Street, across from the French Quarter. The building’s façade is being sanded and painted for a December opening.

“All the classrooms are gonna have recording equipment so we can record each class,” says Derek Douget, the school’s coordinator of music education since 2010. “We have a state-of-the-art stage where we can do performances at the end of the week.”

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Criminal Justice
8:19 pm
Sat July 26, 2014

Business And Community Leaders Working To Reduce Louisiana's Record Incarceration Rate

Credit spirit of america / Shutterstock.com

On a per-capita basis, Louisiana leads the nation in the number of people behind bars. A diverse group of business and religious leaders have come together to support laws that could lower the state’s incarceration rates.

In this latest installment of the continuing WWNO and WYES series on criminal justice reform, Marcia Kavanaugh looks into how the Louisiana Smart on Crime initiative fared in this past legislative session.

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Music Inside Out with Gwen Thompkins
8:21 pm
Fri July 25, 2014

A. J. Croce: Telling Tales

A.J. Croce.
Credit Shelby Duncan

It’s easy to tease out the artists who’ve inspired A.J. Croce’s singing over the years — Ray Charles, Paul McCartney, Buddy Holly, even Ray Davies of The Kinks. He loves early rock n roll and R&B. So perhaps it’s ironic that A.J. rarely sounds like his father, singer-songwriter Jim Croce, who made his mark on music in the late 1960s and early 70s.

With nine albums to his credit and more than 20 years as a touring musician, A.J. Croce is his own man, performing his own music. And a devoted fan base has shown its appreciation for the genre-busting of the younger Croce.

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Coastal Desk
5:17 am
Fri July 25, 2014

Working Coast Camp In Houma Teaches Children About Big Industry

The Working Coast campers set out fishing on their last day.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

South Louisiana’s Terrebonne Parish has low unemployment — there are lots of jobs in offshore services. So many that there could be a shortage of locals with the skills needed. The Working Coast summer camp in Houma teaches kids about the big industries in their area, and aims to get them excited about those career paths.

About 30 kids hang their fishing poles over a small bridge outside the Water Life Museum in Houma, Louisiana. They’re enjoying their last day at the Working Coast Camp.

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Coastal Desk
5:00 am
Fri July 25, 2014

Coastal Rundown: Austin Badon, Marsh Buggies And Golden Meadow

Austin Badon overlooking the wetlands on Paris Road in New Orleans East
Credit Jesse Hardman / WWNO

Welcome to the Coastal Rundown, a new series exploring the people, places, gear, facts and suggested resources across the Gulf Coast.

 

Meet: Austin Badon

City Council Representative, District 100

State Rep. (D), Chairman of the House Education Committee

Motto: “Don’t wait for your ship to come in, swim out to it.”

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Coastal Desk
5:16 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

State Representative In New Orleans East Sounds Call Over Coastal Erosion

Austin Badon has represented New Orleans East’s District 100 in the state legislature for the past decade.
Credit Jesse Hardman / WWNO

The face of coastal erosion in Louisiana is often defined by the most visibly threatened communities. Towns that are literally trying to determine how long they have before they might have to move. And while there’s few people calling on New Orleans residents to start making Plan B’s, some local leaders are trying to get their constituents to be more aware. 

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Features
11:38 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

Richard Campanella Cityscapes: A New Orleans Childhood At Monkey Hill

Playing at Monkey Hill is one of the essentials of a New Orleans childhood.
Credit Mark Gstohl / Flickr

Local geographer Richard Campanella has spent the last 20 years studying the city's topography and says that, unlike other cities, New Orleans' highest and lowest points are man-made creations.

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Music Inside Out with Gwen Thompkins
8:23 am
Fri July 11, 2014

Spend An Hour With John Boutté

John Boutté at the 2008 Voodoo Music Experience.
Jason Saul WWNO

 

When John Boutté commits to a song, he tailors it like a suit from Savile Row, breaking down the lyrics then building them back up again to say exactly what he means. If a Paul Simon song conjures the image of early Americans sailing to the New World on the Mayflower ship, Boutté will sing the same song and mention early Americans who sailed on the slave ship Amistad. If Dave Bartholemew writes that the grass looks greener somewhere else, Boutté will sing that the grass is greener right here at home.

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Notes from New Orleans
2:00 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

New Orleans' First Family Court Judge Says It's A Labor Of Love

Bernadette D'Souza is the first permanent family court judge in Orleans Parish.

Orleans Parish recently created a permanent family court judge position. Legal aid attorney Bernadette D’Souza is the first to hold the post.

On this week’s Notes from New Orleans, Sharon Litwin talks to Judge D’Souza about how she got from a convent in India to a courtroom in Louisiana.

To read more about Bernadette D'Souza, visit NolaVie.com.

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Law
2:58 am
Wed July 9, 2014

States Push For Prison Sentence Overhaul; Prosecutors Push Back

The Lafayette Parish Correctional Center in downtown Lafayette, La. By most counts, Louisiana has the highest incarceration rate in the country, but sentencing reformers have loosened some of the state's mandatory minimum sentences and made parole slightly easier to get.
Denny Culbert for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 7:01 am

Some red states like Louisiana and Texas have emerged as leaders in a new movement: to divert offenders from prisons and into drug treatment, work release and other incarceration alternatives.

By most counts, Louisiana has the highest incarceration rate in the country. In recent years, sentencing reformers in the capital, Baton Rouge, have loosened some mandatory minimum sentences and have made parole slightly easier for offenders to get.

But as reformers in Louisiana push for change, they're also running into stiffening resistance — especially from local prosecutors.

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