Environment

Environment
3:36 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

For The First Time In 70 Years, Wild Whooping Cranes Have Laid Eggs In Louisiana

A pair of wild Whooping Cranes has produced eggs in Louisiana for the first time in seven decades.
Credit Michael Seymour / LDWF

A mated pair of Whooping Cranes has produced eggs in the Louisiana wild for the first time in 70 years, the state Department of Wildlife and Fisheries announced Tuesday.

The announcement, made by LDWF Secretary Robert Barham at the 13th North American Crane Workshop in Lafayette, is a watershed moment in the reintroduction of the endangered birds to the wild. Once widespread, the Whooping Crane population had plummeted to just 21 total birds by the 1940s, mostly due to hunting and the conversion of wetland habitat into agricultural fields.

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NolaVie
4:50 am
Mon March 31, 2014

Managing Menhaden: A New Plan For 'The Most Important Fish In The Sea'

A school of Menhaden fish.
Crabby Taxonomist flickr.com

They’re called bunker up north, and Pogies here in the South, and are sometimes referred to as “The Most Important Fish In the Sea”. These are the Menhaden.

Since it’s not a fish you eat, you’ve probably never heard of it. But the annual Menhaden Advisory Committee meeting was a big deal this year due to a new Menhaden management plan.

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Environment
10:08 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Leeville Arts And Heritage Festival Draws Attention To Disappearing Town

Leeville Arts and Heritage Festival

Leeville, Louisiana is at the southern tip of Bayou Lafourche, along Louisiana state Highway 1. Recent decades have seen the town all but wash away, due to coastal erosion.

This Saturday, March 29, marks the first ever Leeville Arts and Heritage Festival. Janet Rhodus is the executive director of Launch Leeville, a nonprofit founded to promote the town. The Baton Rouge resident described her first trip to Leeville.

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Environment
4:07 am
Mon March 24, 2014

25 Years After Spill, Alaska Town Struggles Back From 'Dead Zone'

Orca Inlet, Cordova's fishing harbor, on a blustery day this month. Commercial fishing is the small Alaskan town's primary industry.
Marisa Peñaloza NPR

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 11:25 am

On March 24, 1989, the tanker Exxon Valdez struck a reef in Prince William Sound, Alaska, spilling 11 million gallons of crude oil into the pristine water. At the time, it was the single biggest spill in U.S. history. In a series of stories, NPR is examining the lasting social and economic impacts of the disaster, as well as the policy, regulation and scientific research that came out of it.

It's a blustery, snowy March day when Michelle Hahn O'Leary offers a tour of Cordova, Alaska, situated on the eastern shore of Prince William Sound.

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Environment
3:08 pm
Sun March 23, 2014

Why The Exxon Valdez Spill Was A Eureka Moment For Science

An oiled murre passes the darkened shoreline near Prince William Sound, Alaska, less than a month after the March 1989 spill.
Erik Hill Anchorage Daily News/MCT/Landov

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 10:36 am

On March 24, 1989, the tanker Exxon Valdez struck a reef in Prince William Sound, Alaska, spilling 11 million gallons of crude oil into the pristine water. At the time, it was the single biggest spill in U.S. history. In a series of stories, NPR is examining the lasting social and economic impacts of the disaster, as well as the policy, regulation and scientific research that came out of it.

Twenty-five years of research following the Exxon Valdez disaster has led to some startling conclusions about the persistent effects of spilled oil.

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Environment
6:41 am
Sun March 23, 2014

The Lingering Legacy Of The Exxon Valdez Oil Spill

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 10:37 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Here in this country, a barge carrying nearly a million gallons of oil has collided with a ship in Galveston Bay, Texas. Cleanup crews are on the scene, but there's no word yet on the extent of the damage.

The spill comes as the country marks a grim milestone. Twenty-five years ago, Captain Joseph Hazelwood made this emergency call.

CAPTAIN JOSEPH HAZELWOOD: Yeah, it's the Valdez back, we've, should be on your radar there, we've fetched up hard aground.

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Environment
3:48 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Environmental Groups Sue Plaquemines Coal Terminal For Violating Clean Water Act

Coal and petroleum waste leak into the Mississippi River from the United Bulk Terminal facility in Plaquemines Parish on Feb. 18. A consortium of environmental groups sued the facility Tuesday morning.
Credit Scott Eustis / Healthygulf.org and SouthWings.org

A lawsuit filed Tuesday morning by a coalition of environmental groups says the United Bulk Terminal, a coal export plant in Plaquemines Parish, is polluting the Mississippi River and threatening communities, and wetlands, nearby.

With a number of new coal plants scheduled to come online in the next few years, the lawsuit seeks to bring the plant into compliance with the law, and up to the standards of other states.

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Green Minute
1:05 pm
Sat March 1, 2014

The Green Minute: NOLA Trash Mob

The NOLA Trash Mob during a recent cleanup at Bayou St. John.
Credit NOLA Trash Mob

We’ve all heard the phrase "One man’s trash is another man’s treasure," but what about "One city’s trash is another man’s mission?"

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Environment
1:16 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

WWNO Coastal Desk And Listening Post: What Do You Think About Flood Insurance?

WWNO is launching its Coastal Desk, a new intiative to cover issues vital to the resilience of Louisiana's waterfront communities. That includes hearing from you, through our Listening Post project.

Take part by texting "Hello" to (985) 200-2433

Sign up and you'll receive text messages with questions about coastal issues in the area. You'll also receive information as we hear about it. It's a way to create conversation on topics like flood insurance, coastal erosion, and how these things impact life in Louisiana.

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Coastal News
2:26 am
Thu February 27, 2014

FEMA Flood Insurance Law Faces Partial Repeal Over Premiums

Levees, like this one in New Orleans, must be certified by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers before appearing on federal flood maps. This change has resulted in higher flood insurance premiums in some areas.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 9:38 am

The House is expected to vote as early as next week to partially repeal a 2012 law that overhauled the National Flood Insurance Program, which is tens of billions of dollars in debt.

The law was meant to make people living in flood-prone areas foot more of the insurance bill. But lawmakers didn't realize how many homeowners would be affected — or how hard they'd be hit.

You can find some of those homeowners in Bayou Gauche, about 30 miles west of New Orleans.

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