environment

The storms that inundated Louisiana this week did not have names, and they were not hurricanes. Nonetheless, officials are calling the Louisiana rain and floods the biggest U.S. natural disaster since Superstorm Sandy.

In California, wildfires have charred more than 350 square miles so far this year, and fire season hasn’t yet hit its peak.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

New Orleans’ streets drew national attention this spring after a giant sinkhole opened up downtown during JazzFest. Since then, several more holes have made it into local news - in Uptown and Mid city.

New Orleanians are used to complaining about persistent potholes in all parts of the city - but, sinkholes are a different animal.

Kenny Platt
Ryan Kailath / WWNO

Recently, WWNO's Coastal Desk profiled an unemployed oilfield worker named Derrick Hadley. When Hadley mentioned a song called "Please Give Us One More Boom," by Robert L. Platt, we played it on air at the end of the story. A few weeks later, Robert L. Platt's son, Kenny Platt, reached out via email.


Natural Resources Defense Council

The forecast for this year’s dead zone off the Louisiana coast is about the size of Connecticut. The lead scientist tracking the annual formation says that is much too big.

A section of the Big Branch Wildlife Refuge smolders.
Ryan Kailath / WWNO

On a clear spring afternoon recently, a massive column of smoke rose up near Lacombe, on the north shore of Lake Pontchartrain. People reported seeing it from across the water. Down below, a fire was raging.

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

As hurricane season approaches, the Army Corps of Engineers is making sure area pumping stations are operating properly. The system is working as planned.

Bob Marshall / The Lens

The recent outbreak of the Zika virus has New Orleans on edge. The Gulf Coast is considered the most vulnerable part of the U.S. Mayor Mitch Landrieu has asked Congress for money to fight Zika, as the city continues local efforts to understand the mosquito-borne disease.

Copyright 2016 WWNO-FM. To see more, visit WWNO-FM.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Even as the price of oil drops, and offshore drilling slows down, huge amounts of crude oil keep flowing into Louisiana’s oil ports. The biggest is LOOP, the Louisiana Offshore Oil Port. It’s a major pass-through point for a lot of U.S. crude. But instead of heading out to refineries, oil is being stockpiled at LOOP.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The oil and gas downturn has resulted in a loss of about 12,000 jobs across Louisiana over the past year. Many of those jobs are concentrated in smaller metropolitan areas, like the Cajun city of Lafayette, which has lost the most. The city that once boomed as a result of oil and gas activity is now struggling to not go bust.

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