Jack Hua is a third year medical school student at Tulane University.  "It's such an enormous feat to get into medical school.  We've been working hard for a really long time.  The specialties make so much more money.  Obviously, someone making $150,000 a year is going to be well-off, it's just that when you compare that to $450,000..." he says.

How can you tell if a city has come back from a tragedy as devastating as Hurricane Katrina?

Ten years after the levees failed in New Orleans, and the waters of Lake Pontchartrain, whipped up by Hurricane Katrina, flooded most of the city, New Orleans residents say there's been much progress since then.

A new NPR/Kaiser Family Foundation poll found that a majority surveyed — 54 percent — says New Orleans has mostly recovered, measured by returning population, new housing, jobs, infrastructure and quality of life.

Ten years after floodwaters from Hurricane Katrina breached the levees, inundating and devastating the city, many residents feel the city is making significant headway, according to a new poll by NPR and the Kaiser Family Foundation, which nonetheless reveals deep racial disparities in the recovery.

NPR's David Greene speaks with Liz Hamel, director of public opinion and survey research at the Kaiser Family Foundation about the survey findings.

Oil and gas jobs in Louisiana have dropped to the lowest level in almost 10 years, according to the Louisiana Workforce Commission.

Eric Smith, Associate Director of the Tulane Energy Institute, says these jobs are some of the best in the state.

"It's a disproportionate effect," says Smith. "When you lose a job offshore, it's like losing two or three jobs onshore in manufacturing."

Some sectors have led the economy to record numbers, but what will it take for the stock market growth to continue?  Certified Financial Planner Byron Moore points to three things to consider when watching the Wall Street ticker.

Copyright 2015 KEDM-FM. To see more, visit

The economic development group Greater New Orleans Incorporated says the region is thriving as it approaches the 10-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. The group says the greatest challenge is becoming complacent with success.

The New Orleans area ranks number 66 among large metro areas when it comes to tech sector hiring. That's one of the findings in a new Brookings Institution study released today about America's "Advanced Industries."

A Loyola University report finds nearly a quarter-million families in Louisiana are struggling to meet basic needs.

The school’s Jesuit Social Research Institute finds low wages, high housing and health-care costs and scarce child care are to blame.

Researcher Ali Bustamante says a Louisiana single parent with one child needs $45,840 a year  to meet a family's basic needs. That bracket needs a $22 hourly wage.

The three metro areas with the highest costs of living in Louisiana are — in order — New Orleans, Baton Rouge and Lafayette.

Copyright 2015 WWNO-FM. To see more, visit

Charleston's TheDigitel / Flickr

A report by the real estate website Zillow says that renters in New Orleans paid about $1.8 billion to landlords last year, an increase of about 5 percent from 2013.

The uptick in rent dollars was linked to a combination of an increase in the number of renters on the market and rising rental costs.

While New Orleans was on par with the national average increase, other cities saw even bigger hikes in the money renters were paying out: San Francisco was up 13 percent, and the money Denver's renters paid was up by more than 10 percent.