development

Phyllis Jordan and Wes Palmisano.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

  This edition of Out to Lunch is a fascinating view of New Orleans business that looks at the past, present and future of the city and surrounding economies with unusual insight. Host Peter Ricchiuti is joined by Phyllis Jordan and Wes Palmisano.

Bell School.
Eileen Fleming / WWNO

The former Bell School Campus in Treme is being transformed into residential and work space for artists and their families. The project is being led by the nonprofit Artspace. Eileen Fleming met up with Artspace spokesman Joe Butler for a look at the historic property – inside and out.

The annual meeting of the Greater New Orleans, Incorporated business development group is normally a chance to reflect on success stories and progress. This year’s gathering had a twist, coming by chance on the day after a disappointing budget special session by the state legislature.

Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

It used to be that a single income could support a family — including owning a home. After 35 years of employment you could retire from the same company you’d been at all that time, with a pension.

Times sure have changed. Now most of us need a savvy work and personal strategy just to navigate our way into the middle class. Peter Ricchiuti's guests on Out to Lunch today are all about helping you find ways to achieve the American dream — and hold onto it.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards joined New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu and other officials to announce $234 million of federal money awarded for helping the city and state better handle future water disasters.

It comes 10 years after a post-Katrina visit to the Netherlands for advice.

http://redevelop.nola.gov/opportunities/property-search

The City of New Orleans has revived a popular blight remediation program called the Lot Next Door. The New Orleans Redevelopment Authority starts taking applications for it Monday.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

For the past 50 years, there has been one place you could see, without fail, James Audubon, Marie Laveau, Huey P. Long and Dracula, together in one room.

But time is running out to mingle with Louisiana’s most notable historical figures. The Musée Conti Wax Museum is closing up shop at the end of the month.

Four state-of-the-art autopsy stations at the new Coroner's Office headquarters replace a converted embalming room in the old office, a former funeral home.
Courtesy George Hero Architects

There is a new three-story, $14.8 million headquarters for the New Orleans Coroner's Office and for Emergency Medical Services, built with funds from FEMA, community development block grants, and a public bond issue. It represents an evolution in services to the community, says Coroner Dr. Jeffrey Rouse.

A Canal Street streetcar.
Nina Feldman / WWNO

Streetcars are an iconic part of New Orleans’ history, but they’re also a very real part of the transportation system. The city is investing more in the system, with a new Rampart Street line under construction.

The Regional Transit Authority says the new line will spur business and job growth, but local riders wonder if a streetcar is really the best way to get them to and from work – or if it’s more for tourists.

New Orleans agencies are conducting online auctions to sell off property. Two University of New Orleans experts are saying the whole process should be ramped up.

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