Community

Bring Your Own Presents: Don't Piss In The Wind

Nov 21, 2016
Alejandro Salazar doing recovery work in Baton Rouge after the flooding of summer, 2016.
Alejandro Salazar

Bring Your Own is a nomadic storytelling series that takes place in unconventional spaces within the New Orleans community. Each month, eight storytellers have eight minutes to respond to a theme. BYO airs on All Things New Orleans and is a biweekly podcast on WWNO.org. More at bringyourownstories.com.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

On Sunday, the local youth group BreakOUT! held a day of action in Armstrong Park. It was part of an international day to honor all transgender people who died by violence in the past year.

Diorama of Lunch Counter Sit-Down Protests - National Civil Rights Museum - Downtown Memphis, Tennessee.
Adam Jones, Ph.D. / wikimedia commons

In this edition of TriPod Xtras, Laine Kaplan-Levenson speaks with Rafat Ali, founder and CEO of Skift, a media company that looks at travel trends.  The two discuss a report his company published about civil rights Tourism in the Deep South.

Bring Your Own Presents: "My VHS Hustle"

Oct 26, 2016
Wall of VHS tapes
August Allen / Flickr

Bring Your Own is a nomadic storytelling series that takes place in unconventional spaces within the New Orleans community. 

This story was told on April 21st, 2016 at the Jazz and Heritage Center, and later produced by Natalie Yahr. The theme of the evening was "(Not) For the Money". Here, Michael Arcos tells of his brief bootlegging career.  

https://www.facebook.com/LouisianaGov/

Louisiana residents impacted by the August floods are facing two important relief deadlines this week.

Thursday, October 13th, is the last day to register for FEMA assistance.

 

Bring Your Own Presents: Leroy's Mission

Oct 5, 2016
Claire Bangser / Bring Your Own

Bring Your Own is a nomadic storytelling series that takes place in unconventional spaces within the community. Each month, eight storytellers have eight minutes to respond to a theme. BYO airs on All Things New Orleans and is a biweekly podcast on WWNO.org.

This story was told on March 3rd, 2016 at the Michalopolous Studio at a Bring Your Own event in partnership Unprisoned.  The story was later produced by Natalie Yahr. The theme of the evening was "Born on Parole". Here, Leroy Perry tells of the lengths he went to prove his innocence, and what he learned along the way.  

Jesse Hardman

WWNOs community engagement project the Listening Post is back with a new episode.

While the service industry looms large for locals looking to make some money, those jobs don’t necessary help people make ends meet, or take care of their families.

With some new industries flexing their muscles in town, some new career options are starting to take hold, but will that mean jobs and leverage for young adults in the city?

 

We asked folks around town the following questions.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ELISE HU, HOST:

Now that Marlene Kennedy finally has her own apartment, she doesn't have to worry where she'll sleep each night.
Cheryl Gerber / Unprisoned

Louisiana is the incarceration capital of the world. But most people behind bars aren’t locked up forever. In fact, 90 percent of them will someday be released. So that makes Louisiana also the reentry capital of the world-- a role the state is ill-prepared for.

Before this month's shooting in Orlando, the deadliest attack on gay people in the U.S. happened at the UpStairs Lounge, a gay bar in New Orleans. On this date in 1973, someone set fire to that bar in the French Quarter, killing 32 people.

No one was ever charged with the arson. And though it remains the deadliest fire in the city's history, neither the mayor nor the governor spoke about it then.

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