Community

Eve Abrams

Ten years after New Orleans flooded following Hurricane Katrina, the city has regained roughly 79 percent of its population. But that doesn’t mean it has 79 percent of the same people.

Much has changed about where New Orleanians live, but one of the biggest is that 97,000 fewer black people live in Orleans Parish than before the storm. It’s hard to pin down exactly where everyone went, but you can get a glimpse of why on one particular street corner. Eve Abrams investigats how who gets on the Megabus tells the story of New Orleans’ diaspora.

New Orleans witnessed its 100th murder of 2015 a week ago.  A 29 year-old local man was shot in his car in the French Quarter. The city did not see it’s 100th murder last year until late August.  New Orleans had seen a decline in its murder rate the past three years. 

Charles West is the director of the City of New Orleans Innovation Delivery Team. His unit oversees the Nola For Life program, a neighborhood level initiative that targets communities with high murder rates . 

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

St. Tammany Parish has one of the highest rates of suicide in the state. It’s a problem that advocates are trying to solve and officials are trying to understand.

St. Tammany Outreach for the Prevention of Suicide, or STOPS, is determined to get the community talking about this problem, and to help those impacted. The 46 suicides in St Tammany Parish last year was a new record. But it’s an old problem. Parish resident Ricky Bryant is part of a long list that stretches back a few decades.

LACCR

The Louisiana Center for Children’s Rights defends the right of every Louisiana child to fairness, dignity and opportunity. Their holistic defense helps young people achieve their legal and life goals.

Ariel Test is an attorney for the Louisiana Center for Children’s Rights. Her and her team defends the vast majority of kids arrested in Orleans Parish.

Eve Abrams / WWNO

Friends of Lafitte Corridor seeks to revitalize the Lafitte Corridor by working to build, program and promote the Lafitte Greenway as a great public space.

“I brought my family along with me: my husband, my granddaughters. We come to have a good time,” says Ariska Everette, who’s sitting on a folding chair in front of a giant movie screen on the Lafitte Greenway. There’s a tub of popcorn in her lap. She’s waiting for the film Annie to start, but she says just being outside, in this space, feels great.

Cheryl Gerber

Covenant House New Orleans is a safe haven for homeless and at-risk youth. 

“Other people been having control of my life all my life. I was a victim of human trafficking and I’m 22 years old,” a young woman at Covenant House tells me.

Using her name might put her safety in jeopardy. Sexually molested and abused as a child, she took to the streets to get away when she was 17 years old.

VIA LINK

VIA LINK provides information, referrals, training and crisis intervention to people, organizations and communities so they can help themselves and others.

The VIA LINK call center is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to listen, answer questions and provide resources to people who call 211 or the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. If a caller is in crisis, the confidential counselor who answers will start helping them on the spot.

"Global Warming is a Hoax" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0BzItCPk5j4

WWNO's Listening Post project asks questions about local news in New Orleans and the Gulf Coast and reports back on the community's response. This week the Listening Post explores the politics of climate change in Louisiana.

Propeller

Since 2009, Propeller tackles the tough challenges in New Orleans by launching socially-minded ventures.

Propeller helps start up companies that have environmental and social missions. Their accelerator program helps entrepreneurs with solutions in primary sectors including health care, education and water. They’re trying to create a critical mass of entrepreneurs tackling these issues form multiple angles in order to move the needle forward on tough topics like obesity, childhood education, and getting more people in Louisiana insured.

Jesse Hardman

As part of a Hurricane Katrina 10th anniversary initiative, Habitat for Humanity is putting up 10 new homes in New Orleans East. A few hundred volunteers are spending the next 10 days along America Street, putting up new single-family homes in lots that have sat vacant since Hurricanes Katrina and Rita flooded this neighborhood. 

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