coastal erosion

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Sea level rise and land loss is affecting communities all over the world, not just in Louisiana. But Louisiana has one of the first communities that will be entirely resettled as a result: the Isle de Jean Charles.



The roots of a dead oak tree are all that holds the edge of this ancient Native American mound together.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The loss of Louisiana’s coast due to saltwater intrusion, sea level rise and industry is a big problem for the environment and the economy. But it could also change our understanding of the state’s history. In some places, the water is taking with it ancient Native American sites, posing challenges for archaeologists.

Zoe Hughes / University of New Orleans

A professor at the University of New Orleans has received a grant to study marshes. The research will compare wetlands in Louisiana with those on the east coast.

Nick Janzen

The Gulf Intracoastal Waterway is a shipping canal that runs over 1,000 miles from Texas to Florida. But in Lafourche Parish, it’s become more than an industrial throughway. It's a battle line against coastal erosion, and experts are determined to keep saltwater out of it.

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

As we head into the spring and summer seasons, people around the state will hit Louisiana waters looking for crabs, shrimp and fish. And as locals tune up their boats and head out onto bayous and into the Gulf, they’ll realize it might be time for a new map.

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

Louisiana faces the highest relative rates of sea level rise in the world. As policy and funding debates rage over how to best restore and protect our coastal communities, local leaders also look for allies elsewhere.

Ellis Lucia for The Lens/ProPublica

Bob Marshall has covered Louisiana’s disappearing coast for decades, including his recent series with Fred Kasten, “Last Call” on WWNO. Now he has a new project, Losing Ground, a collaboration between nonprofit newsroom the Lens, where Marshall is Environment Reporter, and the news nonprofit ProPublica.

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

The best way to understand Louisiana’s rapidly changing coastal map may be to look from above. That’s how you see the small highways headed south, slim like bony fingers, disappearing into a blue backdrop. What a map can’t express are the histories, hopes and desires of communities along the bayous of the Gulf Coast.

Vanishing Points / Wetlands Discovery Center

WWNO’s Coastal Desk is heading to Chauvin, Louisiana to visit some sites that are in danger of being washed out by coastal erosion and sea level rise. After visiting the working coast camp in Houma last month, Laine Kaplan-Levenson learned of the Wetlands Discovery Center’s Vanishing Points project. This online mapping tool identifies and tells the stories of various locations that are at risk of disappearing.

pluralzed / Flickr

The oil and gas industry won a significant victory in the Louisiana Legislature Friday with Senate passage of a bill that seeks to kill a lawsuit filed by a New Orleans area levee board against 97 oil and gas companies.

The lawsuit alleges the companies' drilling activities damaged Louisiana's coast.

Senators voted 25-11 for the measure that is aimed at retroactively voiding the lawsuit. The vote sent the bill to Gov. Bobby Jindal, who is likely to sign it.