arts & culture

Credit: Community Visions Unlimited

This week on Inside the Arts… the New Orleans Street Gallery Project is decreasing blight across the city, one utility box at a time.  We talk with Jeannie Tidy, vice-president of Community Visions Unlimited.

Then, a prolific but elusive 19th century architect’s works come to light in a new exhibit at the Historic New Orleans Collection. We explore An Architect and His City: Henry Howard’s New Orleans with the HNOC’s John Lawrence.

And, we journey down the bayou with artist Aron Belka as he explores the wetlands in a new exhibit opening at LeMieux Galleries. 

The Reading Life celebrates its fifth anniversary with photographer Judi Bottoni and writer Peggy Scott Laborde, whose new book is "New Orleans Mardi Gras Moments."

We'll also hear from performance artist Tim Youd, whose new project is retyping 100 Novels in 10 Years. He'll be in New Orleans to celebrate five of the novels on his list, retyping them at various locations and headquartered at the New Orleans Museum of Art.

This week on Inside the Arts... conversation with world renowned violinist Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg. 

Then, Southern Rep Theatre gears up for the world premiere of Song of a Man Coming Through.  The stage drama is based on the true story of a Louisiana convicted murderer and the legal team that reluctantly became his greatest advocates. We talk with nationally acclaimed actor and Louisiana native Lance Nichols and Southern Rep's artistic director Aimee Hayes.

The Tulane Environmental Studies Program joins with WWNO and the Tulane Environmental Law Clinic for the fourth event in its series on “The Katrina Disaster Now”: a conversation about rising seas, sinking land, climate change, Louisiana, justice, and community – featuring leaders from diverse communities across the Louisiana coast in an event moderated by NPR National Correspondent Debbie Elliott.

Thomas Walsh

People’s expectations about “entertainment” aren’t what they used to be. What passed for fun as little as 10 years ago can’t compete with the stimulating, instant gratification of our iWorld.

The owners of the Musee Conti Wax Museum know this too well: earlier this year they sold the building, which will close in January and be replaced by a set of condominiums. Sandra Weil gave tours there for nearly 30 years and shares the back story of the museum.

This week on Inside the Arts... a new sculpture garden honoring the works of a local art  icon opens in City Park. The Helis Foundation Enrique Alferez Sculpture Garden will open in the New Orleans Botanical Garden. We talk with City Park's Paul Soniat and Jessie Haynes with the Helis Foundation.

This week on The Reading Life: Rick Bragg, whose new collection of work is My Southern Journey: True Stories from the Heart of the South. We’ll also hear from Richard Campanella about The Photojournalism of Del Hall 1950s-2000s—New Orleans and Beyond.  And Audrey Niffenegger gives us a spooky seasonal anthology—Ghostly: A Collection of Ghost Stories.

Ian McNulty

The banh mi has come a long way in New Orleans from the days when we had to call them “Vietnamese po-boys.”  Always a traditional favorite in Vietnamese communities, for food lovers elsewhere these delicious, multi-textured sandwiches have grown from something exotic, to a comfort food craving, to the launch pad for new ideas. 

1. Pelicans preview with Jason Saul and Fletcher Mackel.

2. Jack interviews local breast cancer researcher and physicians.

3.  Jack interviews Henry Griffin about N. O. Film Festival.

JustUs Repertory from India

    Coming up on Inside the Arts, conversation with Dr. Gowri Ramnarayan, artistic director with JustUs Repertory from India. The company's U.S tour lands in New Orleans this week with Fire and Ash, a dramatic theater production that questions our relationship to Mother Earth.

Inspired by ancient scriptures and Indian poems, Fire and Ash blends dance, music, theater and paintings in this performance. It is presented by the Indian Arts Circle of New Orleans.