Arts & Culture

Oreos, Heaven, and America's Most Wanted

Aug 26, 2015
Dare Kumolu-Johnson

Bethany Van Delft is devastated to learn her newborn daughter has Down’s Syndrome.
Bill Bernat goes into an “Oreo blackout.” 
Breeda Miller prints her mother a “ticket to heaven”. 
Josh Bond discovers that he has been living next door to James “Whitey” Bulger.

NOTE: When offensive or FCC-prohibited words appear, they are bleeped and listed in the Content Advisory.  Sensitive content will be given an on-air caution and will be noted here in the description. 

Wayne Amadee

    Coming up on Inside the Arts, three words are on our collective minds this week as we prepare to mark the 10th Anniversary of Hurricane Katrina: Strength, Resilience and Rebirth. Our show this week is dedicated to that spirit of renewal embraced by the power of art to affect change.

We'll visit an exhibit that explores the role architects played in the city's recovery over the past decade.

Then a stage performance at the Joy Theater -- Katrina: Mother Of 'Em All -- uses the power of humor to bring to life unforgettable stories.

Moth Fundraising Hour Fall 2015

Aug 25, 2015

Christian McBride - A young musician gets a once in a lifetime shot at the big time.
Karen Gearon - With her fellow shopworkers at the Dunnes Stores, Karen goes on strike and sparks international interest in the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa. 
Dr. Mary Claire King - Discovers the inherited breast cancer gene after enduring personal heartbreak. 

Ideas for scripting are included below to segue between stories, adapt for your station's approach. NPR news compatible. 

StoryCorps

In the immediate days after Hurricane Katrina, Ben Rongey’s father gave him a special pass which gave him full access to Jefferson Parish. At the time he was a high school senior and acted accordingly: he called his friend Wyatt Higgins so they could explore the city together.

They smooth-talked a National Guardsman, crossed into Orleans Parish, and headed for Wyatt’s house. Flood waters prevented them from driving into the Gentilly neighborhood, so they parked the car and walked the final trek.

This week on Inside the Arts, the Joan Mitchell Center celebrates its Grand Opening and Artist-in-Residence Program.

Then, a love gift to the Crescent City from the land down under. Multi-award winning Australian music photographer Leon Morris releases his new book Homage: New Orleans. The coffee table book in honor of the 10th Anniversary of Hurricane Katrina is the photographer's journey of 20 years photographing the city's musical culture.

And, we round out with conversation with award-winning local artist Jax Frey.

Lisa Richardson, left, is the Director of Research & Evaluation at the Institute of Women & Ethnic Studies. Denese Shervington, right, is its President & CEO.
StoryCorps

For a couple of years after Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans’ narrative belonged to the people who endured the storm and those who helped rebuild after it. But as time went on and the city recovered, things changed. New demographics emerged and people started talking about “the new New Orleans.”

These changes left many people, including psychiatrist Denese Shervington and urban anthropologist Lisa Richardson, wondering about the city’s new identity and their place in it.

Skylar Fein had only lived in New Orleans for a week before Hurricane Katrina nearly tore it apart. He'd moved there to go to medical school, and found himself wandering around a wrecked city. "It's really hard to describe to someone who hadn't seen it what the streets looked like after the storm," he recalls.

Fein is among other New Orleans artists exhibiting work in shows commemorating the 10th anniversary of the 2005 storm. One thing he has in common with some of the other artists: They weren't artists before the hurricane hit.

Richard Campanella

Each month we talk with Richard Campanella about his Cityscapes column for Nola.com/The Times-Picayune. This month the Professor of Geography at the Tulane School of Architecture reflects on the idea of natural disasters and their historic impact on New Orleans.

While Katrina’s 10th Anniversary is taking center stage right now, WWNOs Jesse Hardman sat down with Campanella to talk about another famous hurricane, in 1722, that allowed French city planners to completely redesign the city.

Prison, Princes, and Playgrounds

Aug 12, 2015
Jillian Lauren

Jillian Lauren boards a plane for Brunei in search of a modern day fairy tale. Micaela Blei is an elementary school teacher trying to control a group of third-grade warmongers on the playground. Suzanne Vega's life is threatened hours before taking the stage at the Glastonbury Music Festival. Damien Echols, one of the West Memphis Three, talks about serving 18 years on death row for a crime he did not commit.

Lillie Cotlon, left, encouraged her son, Burnell, to quit his job at Family Dollar and start his own business in their neighborhood.
StoryCorps

New Orleanians encountered one obstacle after another as they rebuilt their city after Katrina. Urban food access became a problem for many neighborhoods, especially those with low income.

Lower 9th Ward resident Burnell Cotlan saw this problem troubling his community, so he built The Lower 9th Ward Market. His mother, Lillie, helped him along the way. 

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