Where Y'Eat

New Orleans writer Ian McNulty hosts Where Y'Eat, a weekly exploration and celebration of food culture in the Crescent City and south Louisiana.

Ian gives listeners the low-down on the hottest new restaurants, old local favorites, and hidden hole-in-the-wall joints alike, and he profiles the new trends, the cherished traditions, and the people and personalities keeping America's most distinctive food scene cooking.

 

Subscribe to Where Y'Eat as a podcast:

1. Open Itunes

2. Go to the File Menu, click on Subscribe to Podcast…

3. Enter this URL: itpc://wwno.org/podcasts/6095/rss.xml

And that’s it! New episodes download automatically.

Ian McNulty

There are lots of ways to prepare crawfish, but it’s the boil that brings out their best qualities, and these are not limited to flavor. Served in massive quantities, dumped upon a table where friends and strangers feast alongside each other, crawfish are the ultimate social food. And as it happens, the annual crawfish mania across this state hits its stride just when Louisiana itself is at its most social.

SoFAB Institute

Some museums offer a chance to connect with the highest achievements of art and ingenuity, to gaze over priceless wonders or to better understand pivotal moments of human history.

At the Southern Food & Beverage Museum, some of what resonates most richly may be artifacts you once had in your pantry or old brand names whose jingles are still stuck in your head.

You’re less likely to swoon over some rarified treasure as to delight in the recognition of something tied up with your own traditions and ties to the region’s food culture.  

Ian McNulty

Think New Orleans needs more street food? This weekend's French Quarter Festival is teeming with inspiration for new ideas.

Street food is a term that has a lot of cachet in the dining world these days. I just wish we could get our hands on it a little more.

Ian McNulty

Mention Mexican food and many people think they already know the score. They start picturing tacos and burritos, chips and salsa, gobs of sour cream and rivers of melted cheddar. These are the touchstones of Tex-Mex cooking. That’s what many of us were raised on when it came to Mexican food. And, for the record, I love that stuff still.

But consider how the differences stacked up during a meal at Del Fuego Taqueria, a Uptown eatery that is part of a wave of new Mexican restaurants arriving in New Orleans.

Paul Cheney

A spirit of competition and creative excess is helping a local charity cook-off grow bigger and better, and in ways beyond the food offerings.

Ian McNulty

Food writer Ian McNulty on a new trend coming ashore in New Orleans with drinks, food and ambiance all set to the tone of tiki.

Ian McNulty

At the intersection of St. Patrick's Day and St. Joseph's Day in New Orleans, food-centric celebrations abound, but so do some unique hazards for the unwary.


Ian McNulty

Ian McNulty

Ian McNulty

We here in Louisiana have never been bashful when expressing our feeling for oysters. We devour them fried, grilled, broiled and baked, and we ravish them raw. But look around the New Orleans restaurant scene these days and it feels like the relationship has reached a new level of affection, and even infatuation.

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