Where Y'Eat

New Orleans writer Ian McNulty hosts Where Y'Eat, a weekly exploration and celebration of food culture in the Crescent City and south Louisiana.

Ian gives listeners the low-down on the hottest new restaurants, old local favorites, and hidden hole-in-the-wall joints alike, and he profiles the new trends, the cherished traditions, and the people and personalities keeping America's most distinctive food scene cooking.

 

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Ian McNulty


Ian McNulty

Ask chefs to prepare one of their favorite steak dishes, and they may not go anywhere near the grill or the broiler. Instead, many of them will start chopping up meat for beef tartare, the classic French dish served raw.

This cold dish has had a warm spot in the hearts of many chefs and nostalgic gourmets for a long time, and now beef tartare is starting to gain wider appreciation and get some star treatment across a wide range of New Orleans restaurants.

Ian McNulty

Father’s Day, food and being there when the stories start percolating around the table.

Dad cooked a lot of the breakfasts when I was growing up. Pancakes were usually the order of the day, but no matter what he was making the meal usually included a little baloney.

Cooking seemed to put dad in the mood for stories, some about his days in the army, some about the dubious adventures he and his brothers got into when they were young. As the syrup and butter went on the pancakes, so the exaggeration and embroidery built these stories up to Paul Bunyan proportions.

Ian McNulty

Ian McNulty

Just where is “local?” In the food world these days, the answer is everywhere.

Local is emblazoned on your grocery store ad and woven across your restaurant menu. It’s at the core of the growing network of farmers markets, and local is fueling the explosion of new cottage industry producers and specialty suppliers. Local food is big, and around New Orleans it’s booming.

When it comes to the question what is local, however, the answer is changing, and in some very interesting ways. This month in particular is a good time to catch up on what’s new.

Ian McNulty


Ian McNulty

Tracing the roots of a widespread network of New Orleans restaurateurs back to one Greek island and one shared American story.

“Opa!” that’s the universal Greek exclamation of joy, and you’ll be hearing it a lot this weekend as the Greek Festival returns to the Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Lakeview. But for some of those sharing in the opa spirit, the toast is about more than just the revelry of the moment.

Ian McNulty

You can chalk up the fiery burn of some dishes at Red’s Chinese to potent chiles. And that fleeting tingle across your tongue? That’s the work of Szechuan peppercorns. But what really gets the blood pulsing at this new Bywater restaurant goes beyond individual ingredients, and gets to something on the rise for restaurants around New Orleans.

Ian McNulty


Ian McNulty


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