Marketplace

Weekdays at 6 p.m.
Kai Ryssdal

The award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us." The 30-minute program — with an irreverent reporting style all its own — airs weekday evenings on more than 320 public radio stations nationwide and boasts the largest audience for any business program in the United States on radio, cable or network television.

In conjunction with Marketplace Morning Report and Marketplace Money, this trio of financial programming covers listeners from wallet to Wall Street.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f96de1c817b26f41489e|5187f939e1c817b26f414881

Playlist

March 31, 2015

6:27 PM
The Afterlife
Artist : YACHT
Album : See Mystery Lights
Composer :
Label : DFA Records
WWNO
1:48 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

WATCH: Marketplace Host Kai Ryssdal's Visit To New Orleans

Credit Fat Happy Media

Kai Ryssdal, the Host and Senior Editor of Marketplace — the national business show airing weekdays at 6 p.m. on WWNO — flew in for just one day for a special event at Le Petit Théâtre on May 29.

After a quick meet-and-greet with some of the station’s major donors, Kai sat down with WWNO News Director Eve Troeh for an interview in front of a packed house, and then answered questions from the audience.

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WWNO Presents
11:36 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

An Evening With Kai Ryssdal, Host Of Marketplace

Kai Ryssdal, host of Marketplace.
Credit Marketplace

Thursday — May 29, 2014
7:30 p.m. at Le Petit Théâtre du Vieux Carré

616 Saint Peter Street

-SOLD OUT-

Or call the box office: (504) 522-2081

$15.00

Join WWNO at Le Petit Théâtre as host Eve Troeh discusses Business, Media and… the meaning of life with Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal.

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Marketplace
3:20 pm
Fri December 6, 2013

As New Orleans Comes Back, Some Neighborhoods Boom, Others Stay Blighted

A shotgun house in the Tremé neighborhood of New Orleans gets new paint.
Credit Eve Troeh / WWNO

About a year ago, Greg Thyssen and Shakti Belway bought an 1800's double shotgun in the Tremé neighborhood.

"I'm tall," Thyssen said, "so I love the high ceilings, a fireplace in every room, beautiful pocket doors."

Beauty, yes, but the house needed work. "The floors were eaten away by termites," Belway said, "and under layers and layers of linoleum."

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Data Visualization
9:00 am
Fri September 27, 2013

How Do You Stack Up? Find Out With Marketplace's Income Upshot

Income Upshot, from Marketplace’s Wealth and Poverty Desk, is a data visualization tool that tracks the relationship between what we make and how we live, work and play. It uses data from sources like the U.S. Census Bureau, marketing firms and academic researchers to explore how much someone’s income says about their lifestyle and consumer behavior.

Environment
6:00 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

Levee Board Takes On Oil Industry Over Damage To Delta

New Orleans' levee board is suing energy companies for damaging the Mississippi River delta by cutting canals through the marshland. The canals let in sea water, which kills marshes, eroding the city's protective buffer against storms. A map of the delta.
Frank Relle

 

Eight years after Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans has a new flood protection system — $14 billion of levees, pumps and flood gates built by the Army Corps of Engineers. Residents, though, don't think that will be enough. The Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority - East, the local levee board, basically, says that as sea levels rise and wetlands down river get washed away, New Orleans will need more help.

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Marketplace Money
8:00 am
Sat April 14, 2012

Bringing fresh food to everyone in New Orleans

Actor Wendell Pierce is working to bring his own chain of grocery stores to food deserts in New Orleans.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

You loved him as Detective William "Bunk" Moreland on "The Wire." You may also know him as the trombone-playing Antoine Batiste from HBO's "Treme."

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Podcasts

  • Friday, April 17, 2015 2:00pm
    Airing on Friday, April 17, 2015: German luxury car companies BMW, Mercedes-Benz and Audi have reported record-high global sales for the first quarter of 2015. Though these carmakers started out in the upscale market, they’re now pushing for a more inclusive customer base.  Will entering the mass market hurt their prestige? We explore. Next, an outage at financial-data giant Bloomberg shows how much some traders rely on it. The event led some markets to stop trading and caused the U.K. government to delay certain bond sales. We take a look at why the ripple effect happened. 
  • Thursday, April 16, 2015 4:00pm
    Airing on Thursday, April 16, 2015: A judge rules that General Motor's bankruptcy shields the company from lawsuits over defective cars built before the bankruptcy. We sort out the consequences of the decision if it stands. Next, the Los Angeles Unified School District  wants its money back for iPads loaded with Pearson software that is sub-par. This is yet another expensive chapter in LAUSD’s disastrous $1 billion-plus classroom tech effort. It’s also another stumbling block on the larger road to the digital classroom. Marketplace reporter Nova Safo uses the LAUSD debacle to talk about what’s at stake as schools convert to digital classrooms and  companies vie for their share of the multibillion-dollar ed-tech market.  
  • Wednesday, April 15, 2015 2:00pm
    Airing on Wednesday, April 15, 2015:  Stephen Dubner, the author of "Freakonomics," rejoins the Marketplace team to discuss the value of diamonds and their hard resale value. High jeweler markups and a limited buyer's market for diamonds have created what's called a "thin market" for the good. Next, some tax preparers are charging high fees and making dubious loans to vulnerable clients. We look at some of the controversial practices these businesses are employing during tax season. Also, the European Union has brought antitrust charges against Google, with claims that the company has taken advantage of the European market by using its search engine to boost its shopping service. Are monopolies always necessarily a bad thing? We explore. 
  • Tuesday, April 14, 2015 2:05pm
    Airing on Tuesday, April 14, 2015: We’ve been talking a lot about the drought out here in California and just who should get how much water and for what purpose.  One of the ways the state’s dealt with shortages in the past is through the spot market, where farmers with strong water rights sell their water to thirsty cities and farmers with more junior rights.  But as Sarah Gardner reports from the Marketplace Sustainability Desk, the state's drought is causing that market model to come up short.  Next, IBM has teamed up with Apple, Johnson & Johnson and Medtronic to launch its "Watson Health Cloud," a service that will use data to create health profiles for patients. We look at the profit motive for each. Plus, a recent draft report from the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee suggests that red meat consumption in the U.S. can be bad for one's health and the environment. The suggestion has caused controversy over whether sustainability concerns should have factored into the committee's report. 
  • Monday, April 13, 2015 2:21pm
    Airing on Monday, April 13, 2015: A study finds that nearly three out of four recipients of Medicaid, food stamps and other aid are members of families headed by someone who works –meaning, someone who works but doesn’t earn a wage high enough to keep them out of poverty. The study says this amounts to a $150 billion subsidy of low-paying employers. This comes as several companies have raised their minimum pay to $9 an hour ($18,720 a year), and unions and others advocate for a minimum wage of $15, as median incomes haven’t grown in 20 years or so. Next, a historic handshake this weekend between Presidents Obama and Castro at the Summit of the Americas has helped to fuel optimism over warming relations with Cuba. But – handshakes aside – what obstacles remain to trading with Cuba for businesses both small and large? We explore.