Marketplace

Weekdays at 6 p.m.
Kai Ryssdal

The award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us." The 30-minute program — with an irreverent reporting style all its own — airs weekday evenings on more than 320 public radio stations nationwide and boasts the largest audience for any business program in the United States on radio, cable or network television.

In conjunction with Marketplace Morning Report and Marketplace Money, this trio of financial programming covers listeners from wallet to Wall Street.

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WWNO
1:48 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

WATCH: Marketplace Host Kai Ryssdal's Visit To New Orleans

Credit Fat Happy Media

Kai Ryssdal, the Host and Senior Editor of Marketplace — the national business show airing weekdays at 6 p.m. on WWNO — flew in for just one day for a special event at Le Petit Théâtre on May 29.

After a quick meet-and-greet with some of the station’s major donors, Kai sat down with WWNO News Director Eve Troeh for an interview in front of a packed house, and then answered questions from the audience.

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WWNO Presents
11:36 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

An Evening With Kai Ryssdal, Host Of Marketplace

Kai Ryssdal, host of Marketplace.
Credit Marketplace

Thursday — May 29, 2014
7:30 p.m. at Le Petit Théâtre du Vieux Carré

616 Saint Peter Street

-SOLD OUT-

Or call the box office: (504) 522-2081

$15.00

Join WWNO at Le Petit Théâtre as host Eve Troeh discusses Business, Media and… the meaning of life with Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal.

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Marketplace
3:20 pm
Fri December 6, 2013

As New Orleans Comes Back, Some Neighborhoods Boom, Others Stay Blighted

A shotgun house in the Tremé neighborhood of New Orleans gets new paint.
Credit Eve Troeh / WWNO

About a year ago, Greg Thyssen and Shakti Belway bought an 1800's double shotgun in the Tremé neighborhood.

"I'm tall," Thyssen said, "so I love the high ceilings, a fireplace in every room, beautiful pocket doors."

Beauty, yes, but the house needed work. "The floors were eaten away by termites," Belway said, "and under layers and layers of linoleum."

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Data Visualization
9:00 am
Fri September 27, 2013

How Do You Stack Up? Find Out With Marketplace's Income Upshot

Income Upshot, from Marketplace’s Wealth and Poverty Desk, is a data visualization tool that tracks the relationship between what we make and how we live, work and play. It uses data from sources like the U.S. Census Bureau, marketing firms and academic researchers to explore how much someone’s income says about their lifestyle and consumer behavior.

Environment
6:00 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

Levee Board Takes On Oil Industry Over Damage To Delta

New Orleans' levee board is suing energy companies for damaging the Mississippi River delta by cutting canals through the marshland. The canals let in sea water, which kills marshes, eroding the city's protective buffer against storms. A map of the delta.
Frank Relle

 

Eight years after Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans has a new flood protection system — $14 billion of levees, pumps and flood gates built by the Army Corps of Engineers. Residents, though, don't think that will be enough. The Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority - East, the local levee board, basically, says that as sea levels rise and wetlands down river get washed away, New Orleans will need more help.

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Marketplace Money
8:00 am
Sat April 14, 2012

Bringing fresh food to everyone in New Orleans

Actor Wendell Pierce is working to bring his own chain of grocery stores to food deserts in New Orleans.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

You loved him as Detective William "Bunk" Moreland on "The Wire." You may also know him as the trombone-playing Antoine Batiste from HBO's "Treme."

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Podcasts

  • Friday, March 27, 2015 12:17pm
    Airing on Friday, March 27, 2015: Amazon is reportedly in talks to buy the London-based luxury online fashion retailer Net-A-Porter. This would be a significant acquisition for Amazon both in terms of the size of the deal and its nature — the E-commerce giant is so far not known for its presence in the high-end fashion market. Plus, word came this week that Facebook has been testing drones in the U.K. that can beam Internet access to the ground via laser. The drone industry is growing fast, even as U.S. regulations on unmanned aircraft continue to be worked out. We look at what the U.S. risks losing if it lags on rulemaking.  
  • Thursday, March 26, 2015 12:27pm
    Airing on Thursday, March 26, 2015: The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has a bunch of new rules for payday lenders. But why do payday lenders even exist? The fact is, people need them, and the reason they need them is because there is no alternative. The U.S. has a large gap in its financial infrastructure that other countries have plugged with reputable, often government-sponsored institutions. Why don’t’ we have something similar here? Plus, Congress is close to finally coming up with a long-term solution to how doctors who see Medicare patients are paid. It’s been almost 20 years of patchwork fixes. But in fixing a problem that dates to 1997, the government would force doctors to make some much needed upgrades they haven’t yet had to make, like being able to provide patient outcome data. Also, the airline industry isn’t like other industries. It’s nearly unique in that when a plane goes down — no matter which carrier it’s with — the entire industry is affected. And everyone who’s flying, thinking about flying, working for an airline, etc., feels more vulnerable. We look at how that phenomenon plays out, and the types of plans/approaches the industry puts into motion after a crash.  
  • Wednesday, March 25, 2015 12:38pm
    Airing on Wednesday March 25, 2015: The Republican budget proposal — more a political document than a financial one, to be sure — is up for votes in Congress today and tomorrow. Like the president’s budget before it, this one is expected to find away around some of the spending cuts laid out under sequestration. The wiggling around and out of those across-the-board cuts started pretty much as soon as they were enacted, and is a good lesson in how federal spending works these days. We explore. Plus, the BBC today announced it is not renewing the contract of Jeremy Clarkson, host of the car show “Top Gear,” who is said to have assaulted his producer. The show is massively popular globally and brings in sales worth an estimated $50 million a year. The gruff Clarkson is a big part of its success despite complaints about his past comments on the show, which many viewers see as racist. We take a look at the business calculation of firing a controversial host.  
  • Tuesday, March 24, 2015 12:03pm
    Airing on Tuesday, March 24, 2015: Three banks have had their "living wills" turned down by regulators. Living wills are instructions that you draw up for doctors and lawyers and accountants, to facilitate your demise and the arrangement of your estate, should you become incapacitated. Pretty simple, really. So why is it so hard for banks? Plus, Facebook is quietly holding talks with at least half a dozen media companies about hosting their content. Details on how this will actually work are scarce but why does Facebook want to do this and why would media companies agree? We investigate.  
  • Monday, March 23, 2015 11:13am
    Airing on Monday, March 23, 2015: RadioShack is bankrupt. So bankrupt that it has gone beyond the usual "let’s work it out with our lenders" scenario, and moved directly to a "let’s tear the company to pieces and sell off the bits" approach. Hedge funds are squabbling over the company like vultures fighting over a coyote carcass, and the bones go to the highest bidder. How did it come to this? We explore. Plus, the World Health Organization just announced that the widely-used weed-killer, Roundup, is a likely carcinogen in humans. How much of this stuff are we eating and how much would it cost farmers and us if we stopped using it?