Here & Now

Weekdays at Noon

Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

Thousands of protesters have descended on a quiet part of North Dakota, occasionally clashing with security personnel over plans to build an oil pipeline under the Missouri River.

Lawsuits are pitting Native American tribes and environmental activists against the Energy Transfer Partners pipeline company.

Amy Sisk, a reporter with Inside Energy, discusses the latest with Here & Now‘s Robin Young.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are preparing for what’s being billed as the marquee moment of the long campaign season: the first presidential debate, which will take place on September 26 in New York.

Trump spent Saturday visiting a black church in Detroit. The move was aimed less at trying to win over the black vote, but instead at cooling claims that he’s insensitive to minorities.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young discusses the latest news from the campaign trail with NPR’s Ron Elving.

Former Stanford student Brock Turner was released from jail Friday.

Turner served three months of a six month sentence for sexually assaulting an unconscious woman in January 2015. The case set off a national outcry, with many arguing that the six month sentence was too lenient.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young gets an update from KQED’s Beth Willon.

Hurricane Hermine made landfall in Florida overnight, before it was downgraded to tropical storm status.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott said Hermine may be responsible for claiming the life of a man who died after he was hit by a tree. Forecasters say the storm most likely will cause flooding in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic states.

This summer has been tough, with record heat, drought, floods and wildfires across much of the country. But in 1816, it wasn’t hot weather people endured. It was bitter cold.

The year came to be known as the “Year Without a Summer.” There was frost and snow all summer long, and it may have been a first taste of how a changing climate can affect peoples’ lives.

The film “The Light Between Oceans” opens tomorrow. The film is based on the best-selling novel by M.L. Stedman. Derek Cianfrance adapted the novel for screen and directed the movie, in which Michael Fassbender stars.

[Youtube]

When it comes to the future of medicine, few therapies get people as excited as stem cells.

Researchers are looking at them for future treatment for diseases like Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, Type 1 Diabetes and more. But the key word is “future.” Progress with stem cell therapies has been slow and the few clinical trials taking place are in their infancy.

Yet despite the lack of FDA-approved treatments, stem cell clinics — which promise cures for conditions as varied as arthritis, pulmonary disorders and orthopedics — are popping up all over the country.

Mexicans by and large have been excoriating their president for inviting Donald Trump for what looked like a state visit yesterday.

Journalist Esteban Illades of the Mexican news site Nexos called it “the most painful day in the history of the Mexican presidency.” Illades joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young with more about how the country is reacting to Trump’s trip.

The great comic actor Gene Wilder died Monday at age 83 from Alzheimer’s disease.

Known for his roles in such films as “Young Frankenstein,” “Blazing Saddles” and “Willie Wonka And The Chocolate Factory,” Wilder’s performances delighted audiences for decades.

Here & Now pays tribute by revisiting host Robin Young’s 2005 interview with Wilder about his then-new memoir, “Kiss Me Like a Stranger.”

Here’s the raw audio from their interview:

Array

The flooding that devastated Baton Rouge Louisiana this month is a grim reminder of the havoc that nature can wreak on residents of the state. Today marks 11 years since Hurricane Katrina made landfall on the Gulf Coast, killing more than 1,800 people and displacing a million others.

Pages