Here & Now

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Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

The new Netflix original series, “Stranger Things,” features the residents of a small town in Indiana and their search for a middle school boy who mysteriously goes missing. Winona Ryder plays the boy’s frantic mother, but the cast is otherwise a mash of character actors and children.

NPR’s Eric Deggans speaks with Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson about the show’s monumental popularity, Ryder’s performance and a minor character who’s stolen the internet’s heart.

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After 27-year-old Seth Rich was shot to death in Washington, D.C. on July 10, rumors started that his death was linked to his work for the Democratic National Committee.

There was even the suggestion that Rich was the source of the emails given to WikiLeaks that embarrassed the DNC as its convention was starting in Philadelphia. WikiLeaks won’t confirm or deny that, but it is offering a $20,000 reward for information that leads to a conviction in the case.

A fast-moving fire in San Bernardino, California has now engulfed more than 6,000 acres, as two fires in Northern California continue to burn.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with UCLA professor Glen MacDonald about how these fires started and what it means for the rest of 2016.

Donald Trump is planning to roll out a slew of new policy proposals in coming weeks as he continues to try to steady his floundering campaign.

Trump has largely avoided policy specifics in his campaign, focusing instead on broad goals.

Trump says that he will unveil a proposal to reduce the cost of childcare and increase choices for parents.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young recaps Trump’s speech before the Detroit Economics Club with NPR’s Jim Zarroli.

A Hong-Kong bitcoin exchange that was hacked this week may distribute the losses among all of its users, according to a Bloomberg blog post today. Hackers stole about $68 million worth of bitcoin from the exchange, Bitfinex.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Michael Regan of Bloomberg Gadfly about the hack.

A 21-year-old father and his 4-year-old son were shot at in their car in Phoenix and police say its the latest attack by a serial killer who has killed seven people.

The boy and his father were not injured in the attack, which took place last month. Police also say that there was no apparent motive. The attacks have been happening since March, many of them in the low-income neighborhood of Maryvale.

Denis Cuspert, the German-born former rapper known as Deso Dogg and an ISIS recruiter, was declared dead by U.S. officials after an airstrike in October. The claim was disputed and after a profile of Cuspert in The Fader last month, the Pentagon reversed its statement, saying the jihadist survived.

Cuspert’s story offers a window into the work and effect of extremist propaganda, as well as the rise of foreign fighters traveling to Syria.

Although the world’s attention is on the Olympics, there’s plenty going on in the sports world at home.

Baseball’s trading deadline was this week. Some big players got traded, some troublesome ones didn’t. The college football pre-season coaches poll is out. And, Nike is shedding much of its golf gear.

Here & Now‘s Eric Westervelt talks with Here & Now sports analyst Mike Pesca.

The Rolling Stones ended their 1969 U.S. tour with a free concert at the old Altamont Speedway in northern California. It was supposed to be a celebration, but it turned into chaos.

A young fan was stabbed to death, allegedly by a member of the Hells Angels, right in front of the stage as the Stones performed. The killing was captured on film because a documentary crew was making the film called “Gimmie Shelter.”

The highway can be a lonely place for truck drivers, who often travel long distances for days and weeks without seeing family and friends. But an organization called Truckstop Ministries offers a sanctuary for tired drivers to reflect, rest and pray.

Saul Gonzalez of Here & Now contributor KCRW in Los Angeles paid a visit to a truck stop church off Interstate 10 in southern California and has our story.

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