Here & Now

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Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

Classic Comics Return To Your Doorstep

Nov 13, 2015

It used to be that people bought the Sunday newspaper to read the comics – at least that was one of the reasons. This Sunday, hundreds of papers around the country will include a special 16-page insert of classic comic strips.

The occasion marks the 100th anniversary of King Features, which syndicates older strips such as “Blondie,” and “Beetle Bailey” and newer ones such as “Mutts.”

Comics scholar A. David Lewis joins Here & Now‘s Indira Lakshmanan to talk about the commemoration of classic comics this weekend.

The numbers aren’t as large as the flow into other European countries, but there are some refugees seeking asylum who are making their way into Norway through Russia.

The interesting thing about their story is that they ride bikes across the border to get around the rule that crossing by foot is not allowed. Here & Now’s Indira Lakshmanan checks in with BBC correspondent Tim Whewell, who has seen this occur.

Voodoo, goth, exotica and tiki music are all styles that Darrell Brogdon plays on his show “Retro Cocktail Hour” on Kansas Public Radio. Brogdon describes the music on the show as “shaken not stirred.” He joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson for week’s DJ Session.

Tim Nugent, known as “the father of accessibility” at the University of Illinois in Urbana, died Wednesday. Nugent is credited with fighting for people with disability laws and advocating for accessibility laws.

Here & Now co-host Robin Young is saying farewell for several weeks. She’s getting knee surgery with Dr. Dennis Burke (whom she encourages you to Google). Wednesday, Nov. 11 is her last day on the show before surgery.

Just after midnight this morning, the city of Montreal began dumping raw, untreated sewage into its main waterway, the St. Lawrence River. Over the next six days, the city will dump around 2.1 billion gallons of untreated sewage into the river, which runs from the Great Lakes to the Atlantic Ocean, along part of the U.S.-Canada border.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Tracey Lindeman of the CBC in Montreal, about why the city is dumping so much sewage into the river, and what the environmental implications could be.

Food nerds everywhere love Kenji Lopez-Alt. Though he graduated from MIT with a degree in architecture, he discovered his true life calling when he went to work in a restaurant kitchen.

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Later this month Congress is expected to give final passage to a six-year, $325 billion transportation bill that will be the first major piece of legislation out of the House of Representatives since Paul Ryan became speaker of the House.

It replaces a series of stopgap funding measures just in time to keep the Highway Trust Fund in the black, but many transportation experts say the federal government continues to under-fund public transit, as well as long-term infrastructure projects.

Taking Support For Veterans To New Heights

Nov 10, 2015

Retired Air Force Master Sgt. Jimmy Petrolia will try to set two world records for a wingsuit jump when he leaps from a plane on Veterans Day. He’ll be flying at around 30,000 feet when he jumps. The two world records he’s trying to break are time spent in the air and distance traveled.

British Prime Minister Pushes EU Reform

Nov 10, 2015

With a referendum expected in 2017, Prime Minister David Cameron says his country faces a “huge decision” on its European Union membership. Today he outlined a reform plan he hopes will make that membership more appealing to the U.K.

Among the reforms Cameron wants is one allowing Britain to restrict benefits for migrants from other member states. BBC political correspondent Rob Watson speaks with Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson about the reforms and what these could mean for Britain and the EU.