Here & Now

Weekdays at Noon

Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

The Supreme Court is scheduled to rule on two landmark cases in the next few days – same-sex marriage and the Affordable Care Act. Advocates and critics of the death penalty are also watching for a ruling on the constitutionality of some lethal injection drugs.

But why do all these big cases come at the same time? What goes on behind the scenes of the Supreme Court as a session winds down? Here & Now’s Robin Young asks NPR Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg.

As politicians across the South are stepping in to call for the removal of the Confederate battle flag and other symbols of the Confederacy, big businesses are also joining the fray. Wal-Mart, eBay, Amazon and others have promised to pull merchandise tied to the flag, in some cases adding strong arguments against the products.

Of all the ingredients she uses in her dishes, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst prizes garlic above all. “Garlic is the spine of all my cooking. I cannot imagine cooking without it,” she told host Robin Young.

Kathy gave us this primer on garlic scapes, green garlic and roasted garlic. She also brought us these four recipes:

As NATO defense ministers gather for a meeting in Brussels tomorrow, they face a central question: Just how serious is the threat from Russia? Some say they have much bigger problems than Vladimir Putin, but others fear the Kremlin is growing dangerously hostile.

Any day now, the U.S. Supreme Court is expected to decide whether or not states have the constitutional right to ban same-sex marriage. Whichever way the court goes, this ruling could create a murky legal situation for several states that allow same sex marriage, as well as several states that prohibit it.

It has been six days since nine people were shot and killed at Emanual AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina. The shooting has ignited a debate about the Confederate flag, which still flies at the statehouse in South Carolina, while the state and American flags are at half-mast.

Remembering Composer Gunther Schuller

Jun 22, 2015

Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Gunther Schuller died on Sunday at the age of 89. He was known for his versatility: as a horn player he performed with the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra and recorded with Miles Davis. As the head of the New England Conservatory in Boston, he introduced jazz into the curriculum. His works “Where the Word Ends” and “Dreamscape” were also performed by the Boston Symphony Orchestra.

Golf has a new star – 21-year-old Jordan Spieth. He won the U.S. Open trophy yesterday with a one-stroke victory. He also won the Master’s in April, and is the youngest to win two majors in one year since 1922. Sports reporter Dave Sheinin of The Washington Post joins Here & Now’s Robin Young with details.

The Obama administration is proposing new regulations aimed at cutting carbon pollution from medium and heavy-duty trucks.

Citing climate change concerns, the rule from the Environmental Protection Agency and the Transportation Department would raise fuel efficiency for rigs hauling goods like steel, oil and timber, as well as delivery vehicles and dump trucks.

The proposal will be open for public comment, and the administration is expected to have a final version next year.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has announced that chimpanzees in captivity are now considered endangered and ineligible for certain biomedical research.

Chimps are the closely related to humans and are the preferred animal for testing. Some research will continue, but only if it’s beneficial to the chimps.

Pages