Here & Now

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Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

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NPR Story
1:40 pm
Fri December 12, 2014

On Stage: Comedians Under The Radar

Maria Bamford performs her stand-up comedy on Comedy Central. (YouTube screenshot)

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 3:52 pm

In our series On Stage, we look at what’s happening on the boards across the country. We’ve covered tap dance competitions and marching band smackdowns, but today’s installment is something a little different: who should you look for in the stand-up comedy world?

Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks to Dylan Gadino, founder of the website laughspin.com, about the under-the-radar comedians he recommends.

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NPR Story
1:40 pm
Fri December 12, 2014

Obama: NFL 'Behind The Curve' On Rice Case

President Barack Obama says the Ray Rice domestic violence case showed that the National Football League was “behind the curve” in setting policies about athlete behavior. He says new policies now in effect will send a message that there is no place for such behavior.

He says in an interview Friday with Colin Cowherd on ESPN radio that “an old boys’ network” at the NFL had created “blind spots.”

He says: “You don’t want to be winging it when something like this happens; you want to have clear policies in place.”

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NPR Story
1:40 pm
Fri December 12, 2014

Meeting The Maker Of Moore's Law

What’s in a name? Key chip dimensions, such as the transistor gate length [yellow] and the metal one half pitch [orange]—half the distance spanned by the width of a wire and the space to the next one on the dense, first metal layer of a chip—have decreased but not strictly tracked the node name [red]. These numbers, provided by GlobalFoundries, reflect the company’s plans to accelerate the introduction of 14 nm chips in 2014, a good year early. (Data Source: GlobalFoundries)

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 4:12 pm

It almost feels like a law of nature. You break your two-year-old smartphone. The next day you go the store and find a new one that’s faster and cheaper and just plain better. Computer chips keep getting better — it’s a phenomenon that engineers call Moore’s law. And it’s about to celebrate an anniversary.

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NPR Story
1:40 pm
Fri December 12, 2014

Doctors Consider What They Can Do About Gun Violence

The artwork "Non-Violence" (a.k.a. "The Knotted Gun") by Fredrik Reuterswärd was a gift from the government of Luxembourg to the United Nations in 1988. (jcapaldi/Flickr)

The idea that guns are dangerous to your health is not new. But figuring out what steps, if any, doctors should take to protect people from gun violence is both new and politically explosive.

Recently, more than 100 physicians and crime prevention advocates gathered in Boston for what they say was the first continuing medical education course on how to prevent gun violence. Martha Bebinger from Here & Now contributor station WBUR was there and has this report.

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NPR Story
2:09 pm
Thu December 11, 2014

CIA Chief: Results Of Harsh Interrogation Unknown

Did the CIA’s harsh interrogation of terrorism suspects yield crucial information that could not have been obtained another way? CIA chief John Brennan says the answer cannot be known.

The Senate torture report this week asserted that none of the CIA’s techniques used against captives provided critical, life-saving intelligence. Brennan told a news conference that valuable intelligence did come from the interrogations.

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NPR Story
1:26 pm
Thu December 11, 2014

‘Water Stories’: A Conversation In Paint And Sound

"Spill" by Anne Neely, part of the "Water Stories" exhibit at Boston's Museum of Science. (Courtesy of Ann Neely)

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 12:56 pm

Nationally acclaimed artist Anne Neely has produced an exhibit exploring the phenomena of water — not only how hit relates to nature, but also to memory and imagination.

Her paintings, currently on display at Boston’s Museum of Science, explore the beauty of water, but also raise a cautionary flag about issues that threaten the world’s water, including pollution and climate change.

The exhibit is accompanied by an audio composition by sound artist Halsey Burgund, whose water-themed compositions play throughout the gallery.

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NPR Story
1:26 pm
Thu December 11, 2014

'Birdman' Tops Golden Globes With 7 Nominations

“Birdman” squawked loudest in the Golden Globes nominations, flying away with a leading seven nods including best picture in the comedy or musical category.

In nominations for the 72 annual Golden Globes announced Thursday morning by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, “Boyhood” and “The Imitation Game” trailed with five nods apiece. Those two films led a best drama category that also included “Foxcatcher,” “Selma” and “The Theory of Everything.”

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NPR Story
1:26 pm
Thu December 11, 2014

California's Whooping Cough Epidemic

Pharmacist Kristy Hennessee administers a vaccination against whooping cough (pertussis), at a Walgreen's Pharmacy in Pasadena, California on September 17, 2010. (Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 2:09 pm

Whooping cough has reached epidemic levels in California. Nearly 10,000 people in the state have been diagnosed with the disease this year, as of the end of November, making it the worst whooping cough outbreak in 70 years.

Whooping cough, also known as pertussis, can be treated with antibiotics but can be deadly for young infants.

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NPR Story
3:06 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Training Simulator Leaves Officers Surrounded

Military servicemen use VirTra's training center(Facebook)

A recent rash of police shootings of unarmed black men, and the shooting of a 12-year-old in Cleveland who was holding a BB gun, have raised questions about how police are trained to use their guns.

Today, Here & Now begins an occasional series looking at just that. We start with a look at simulators. A company called VirTra makes this equipment, including a $200,000 firearms training simulator being used by local and national law enforcement agencies.

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NPR Story
2:19 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Kathy Gunst's Holiday Favorites

Be sure to make multiple batches of Andrea's Chocolate-Dipped Buttercrunch. (Kathy Gunst)

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 9:17 am

Just in time for the holidays, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst shares recipes for her favorite holiday ham glaze and her favorite food gift: her sister-in-law’s chocolate-dipped buttercrunch (recipes below). She also shares a few of her picks for the year’s great cookbooks. See her full list of cookbook recommendations here.

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