All Things New Orleans

Thursdays at 1:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.

WWNO’s radio magazine: a weekly half-hour of timely news, cultural features, and commentary from all corners of our city. Hosted by Jack Hopke.

courtesy of the Holden Family Collection

Most Americans hear the phrase “slave trade” and picture ships sailing across the Atlantic Ocean, with captured Africans chained inside, terrorized and sick. But twice as many people were sold in the domestic slave trade, which forcibly moved over a million people, primarily from the Upper South to the Lower South, primarily over land and on foot.

After the United States outlawed international slave trading in 1808, New Orleans became home to the nation’s largest domestic slave market.

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

Making a home in Southeastern Louisiana has always meant risk of flooding. While some families in low lying coastal parishes elevated their homes in the 1990s, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita kicked off a boom of raising homes.

Now, more than 150 elevation companies operate in Orleans Parish alone, and have spent the past decade competing for billions of dollars in federal subsidies to help local homeowners elevate.   

Mallory Falk / WWNO

Rowan Shafer is a third grade teacher at Morris Jeff Community School. She's committed to teaching a social justice curriculum... which she knows can sound abstract.

"Yeah, those are easy words to say that mean a lot of things," she says.

In this month's Voices of Educators segment, Shafer describes one of her favorite social justice units and explains why, after years of teaching fourth grade, she switched to third.

Do you know a great teacher to include in our series? Send us an email: comments@wwno.org

Mallory Falk / WWNO

When a school shuts down, families have to figure out where to go next.

Anthony Parker faced that decision this year. His son AJ was a kindergartner at Lagniappe Academies, which closed on May 8.

Parker spoke with WWNO Education Reporter Mallory Falk about finding a new school for AJ and shared his advice for other families.

Support for education reporting comes from Bapist Community Ministries and Entergy Corporation

Jesse Hardman

As part of a Hurricane Katrina 10th anniversary initiative, Habitat for Humanity is putting up 10 new homes in New Orleans East. A few hundred volunteers are spending the next 10 days along America Street, putting up new single-family homes in lots that have sat vacant since Hurricanes Katrina and Rita flooded this neighborhood. 

Ian McNulty

Tracing the roots of a widespread network of New Orleans restaurateurs back to one Greek island and one shared American story.

“Opa!” that’s the universal Greek exclamation of joy, and you’ll be hearing it a lot this weekend as the Greek Festival returns to the Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Lakeview. But for some of those sharing in the opa spirit, the toast is about more than just the revelry of the moment.

The Historic New Orleans Collection

For 37 years, John Bullard directed the New Orleans Museum of Art and oversaw many blockbuster shows during his tenure.

French Impressionists always drew large crowds, and subjects like The Gold of El Dorado and Alexander the Great were well received, but none compared to the Treasures of Tutankhamun. The ancient boy king had become a cultural sensation by the late 1970s, when New Orleans became ground zero for "Tut-Mania."

wikicommons

Since the debate over the noise ordinance came to a standstill last April, live music advocates and neighborhood groups are stuck with an unlikely piece of legislation to deal with sound in the city:  zoning.

It’s early evening on Frenchmen Street, and the doors of this bar are wide open. Tourists are drifting in and out, and the music is free. It’s also illegal.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

The school year is winding down, and for three New Orleans charters, the last day will bring dramatic changes. Two of those schools are closing for good. The third – kindergarten through 8th grade school Andrew H. Wilson Charter – is getting a new operator.

The story of Wilson's future is the first in WWNO's series Closing Costs.

Wilson's contract was up for review this year. The school had to earn a D to get renewed. It missed the grade by less than one point.

Louisiana Research Collection

A century before New Orleans was dubbed “Hollywood South,” the Crescent City was poised to become a major center for silent film studios. Producer Eve Abrams spoke with Tulane professor of communications Vicki Mayer about her Summer 2015 article for Louisiana Cultural Vistas Magazine, “Film Follies,” and about how the movie industry, culture, and the political economy intersect in Louisiana.

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