All Things New Orleans

Thursdays at 1:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.

WWNO’s radio magazine: a weekly half-hour of timely news, cultural features, and commentary from all corners of our city. Hosted by Jack Hopke.

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Coastal Desk
1:30 pm
Thu November 20, 2014

WWNO's Jesse Hardman Interviews Nola.com's Mark Schleifstein

Nola.com/The Times-Picayune environmental reporter Mark Schleifstein.
Credit Nola.com

This fall a series of long form news pieces about Louisiana's coast have appeared in various national media.

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Education
7:30 am
Thu November 20, 2014

In New Orleans and Across Nation, No-Excuses Schools Face Pushback

Credit Sebastian Blanco / Creative Commons

In New Orleans and nationally, many schools have adopted a no-excuses model. They enforce strict rules and suspend students at high rates.

In a new article out this week in the Atlantic and Hechinger Report, reporter Sarah Carr looks at the push back against no-excuses discipline. She profiles several local charter schools, including Carver Collegiate, New Orleans College Prep, and KIPP Renaissance.

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Latest News
4:30 pm
Mon November 17, 2014

GradNation Summit Focuses On Youth Services

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The Salt
8:51 am
Mon November 17, 2014

In The Big Easy, Food Vendors Create A Little Honduras

Taqueria La Delicia is a lonchera, or food truck, that parks near a Lowe's Home Improvement store in New Orleans. The owner is Honduran, and so are many of the day laborers who eat there.
Laine Kaplan-Levenson WWNO

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 4:31 pm

Thanks to a quirk of history — and a love of bananas — New Orleans has had a Honduran population for more than a century. But that population exploded after Hurricane Katrina, when the jobs needed to rebuild the city drew waves of Honduran immigrants. Many of them stayed, and nearly a decade later, they've established a thriving — if somewhat underground — culinary community.

Signs of that community abound, if you know where to look.

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Arts & Culture
12:59 pm
Thu November 13, 2014

Designing, Staging And Performing 'Rusalka' At The New Orleans Opera Association

Melissa Citro as the eponymous 'Rusalka' in a full dress rehearsal.
Credit New Orleans Opera Association

The New Orleans Opera Association’s season continues this weekend with Rusalka, a work from 1900 by Antonín Dvořák, one of America’s favorite composers.

Robert Lyall, the opera company’s Executive and Artistic Director, talks about the production.

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Features
10:47 am
Thu November 13, 2014

Easter Seals And Audubon Aquarium Providing Special Opportunity To Kids With Special Needs

Charles Monnot and Ava Jane Irvine meet Sassy the penguin, in a program provided by Easter Seals Louisiana and the Audubon Aquarium of the Americas.
Credit Jason Saul / WWNO

The Audubon Aquarium of the Americas is closed on Mondays.

It’s a day to dust off from the press of thousands — to replace lightbulbs, install equipment and polish off inquisitive little nose prints on both sides of the glass.

And sometimes, thanks to Easter Seals Louisiana and a special program at the Aquarium, the darkened halls are also filled with soft laughter, from throats that haven’t had occasion to laugh as much as most.

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Education
3:30 pm
Mon November 10, 2014

Voices Of Educators: Deborah Richardson

After three decades running the cosmetology program at John McDonogh High School, Deborah Richardson packed up her classroom and teaching salon last spring. Among the supplies: mannequin heads with human hair.
Credit Mallory Falk / WWNO

As New Orleans continues to reshape public education, WWNO seeks to highlight teachers who bring unique talents and perspectives to their work. We feature one such educator each month.

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Community
3:20 pm
Fri November 7, 2014

Cityscapes: When St. Bernard Made Cars

The 1922 Ford Assembly plant in Arabi, St. Bernard Parish
TheHenryFord.org

In this month's Cityscapes column for NOLA.com and The Times-Picayune, geographer Richard Campanella chooses another industrial subject. The Ford Motor Co. plant in Arabi, along the Mississippi River in St. Bernard Parish, employed hundreds of local workers, starting in the early 1920s.

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Music
5:08 pm
Thu November 6, 2014

Drummer And Tuba Player Work To Stay Sharp For Band And College

The Sonic Boom of the South at Jackson State isn't just a band; it's the university's most visible marketing tool.
Keith O'Brien NPR

Originally published on Thu November 6, 2014 5:44 pm

Six months ago, we brought you the story of the Edna Karr High School marching band in New Orleans. Two members of the band in particular, snare drummer Charles Williams and tuba player Nicholas Nooks, or Big Nick as his friends call him, earned scholarships to Jackson State University in Mississippi — their dream.

The marching band at Jackson State is known as the Sonic Boom of the South. Band camp began in August with 164 freshmen. But after weeks of late nights and early mornings, musical training and also push-ups, 24 had quit.

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Coastal Desk
8:50 am
Thu November 6, 2014

WWNO's Coastal Glossary

Aerial view of wetlands
Credit U.S. Fish & Wildlife Services / Wikimedia Commons

As we explore the Gulf Coast more comprehensively than ever before, trying to understand better the complex relationships inherent in the restoration process, there's a lot to learn and keep track of.

In order to both understand and talk about coastal erosion, an expanded vocabulary is needed — one filled with brand-new terms whose definitions are integral to absorbing the problems and solutions Louisiana faces around water and land loss.

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